California Releases Emergency Cannabis Regulations

On November 16, 2017, California’s three cannabis licensing agencies published emergency regulations to govern both the medical and adult-use cannabis industry in California under the Medical and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA) (Bus. & Prof. Code 26000 et seq.). The regulations published by the Bureau of Cannabis Control, the Department of Food and Agriculture and the Department of Public Health cover, among other things, cultivating, manufacturing, testing, growing, packaging and potency requirements.

Below are highlights of the emergency regulations. This post is the first in a series of entries on the Duane Morris Cannabis Industry blog that will provide an analysis of the new regulations. If you have any questions about the regulations, please contact Jennifer Briggs Fisher in our San Francisco office or Justin Santarosa in our Los Angeles office.  Continue reading “California Releases Emergency Cannabis Regulations”

Know the Law: The Legal Side of a Cannabis Business

Join Duane Morris’ Patricia Heer at the October 12 NYC Women Grow event, “Know the Law: The Legal Side of a Cannabis Business,” in Duane Morris’ New York office, starting at 6:30 p.m.

The panel discussion will address the legal issues that current, future or ancillary businesses need to consider when working in the cannabis space.

Speakers

Patricia H. Heer Special Counsel, Duane Morris, LLP

Deanna Clark-Esposito, Managing Attorney, Clark-Esposito Law Firm, P.C.

Lauren Rudick, Partner, Hiller, PC

For more information and to register, visit the event website.

Patricia Heer Presenting at 4th Annual Cannabis World Congress and Business Expo in Boston

Duane Morris’ Patricia Heer will be presenting at the 4th Annual Cannabis World Congress and Business Exposition in Boston on October 4-6, 2017.

Patricia’s presentation, “Cannabis and Social Media with Some Practical and Legal Implications,” will take place on Friday, October 6 at 11:00 a.m.

The Annual Cannabis World Congress and Business Expos are the leading forums for doing business in one of the fastest growing industries in the United States. If you’re employed in the cannabis industry, a current business owner, interested in starting a cannabis business, provide private equity and investment resources, or provide professional or business services, these events provide numerous informative presentations and networking opportunities.

For more information and to register, please visit the event website.

Racial Discrimination in the Legal Cannabis Space: New Industry, Same Old Story???

Seth Goldberg

Attend any of the conferences or trade shows springing up in the emerging legalized recreational and medical marijuana space, and one thing you’ll notice is an absence of racial diversity.  Why?

There are a number of possible explanations for the comparatively low number of minorities participating in the space, including, high start-up costs and restricted access to capital, especially given the reluctance of commercial banks to enter the fray, and limited political ties in a highly politicized system. Those reasons alone could be creating barriers for minorities to enter the market as owners and investors.  Continue reading “Racial Discrimination in the Legal Cannabis Space: New Industry, Same Old Story???”

The Federal Antitrust Laws May Not Protect Competition and Consumers In The Cannabis Industry

Seth Goldberg

To assert a federal antitrust claim, a plaintiff must have standing under Article III of the U.S. Constitution and must also have suffered an injury of the type the antitrust laws were intended to prevent and that flows from that which makes defendants acts unlawful. Brunswick Corp. v. Pueblo Bowl-O-Mat, Inc., 429 U.S. 477, 489 (1977).  The Brunswick standard generally benefits consumers who have paid artificially high prices as a result of a defendant’s anticompetitive conduct, or a competitor of a defendant that abused its market power to compete unfairly.

The federal antitrust laws, including the Brunswick standard, are one of the many protections intended to keep competitors on an even playing field and striving to beat one another by offering the optimal combination of quality and price to consumers, and to protect consumers from overreaching and opportunistic manufacturers that use nefarious means to impose a price they would be otherwise unable to charge.  These laws have been critical in shaping industries.

However, it may be that the federal antitrust laws are among the federal laws unavailable to cannabis industry participants, as the federal antitrust laws are limited to commerce “among the states,” i.e., interstate commerce.  Because cannabis is still prohibited under the Controlled Substances Act, its legal manufacture and distribution is generally limited to intrastate activities.  Thus, competition for legal cannabis is, by and large, necessarily intrastate.   Fortunately, most states have antitrust laws that mirror federal antitrust laws, and borrow from the federal judicial precedent they have generated.  However, as a general matter, the federal courts and federal judges are more experienced than the state courts in the complex economics underlying most antirust matters.

For the burgeoning cannabis industry, this may be yet another problem arising out of the federal prohibition of cannabis.  It means that consumers of cannabis products, such as cannabis, vapes, edibles, and possibly ancillary flower-touching products, may not be protected from inflated prices resulting from anticompetitive conduct, such as price-fixing agreements or agreements to allocate markets, and competitors for those products may not be able to ensure a level playing field with the largest companies, allowing the powerful companies to take advantage of their position by inflating prices.

The bottom line is that as the cannabis industry continues its growth at breakneck speed, manufacturers of cannabis, cannabis-infused, and cannabis-related products, may be tempted to engage in the types of anticompetitive conduct the federal antitrust laws are best able to correct, with the help of experienced federal judges, and consumers of those products may unfortunately be exposed to artificially inflated price increases flowing from such conduct left unchecked.  While not all cannabis manufacturers or cannabis-related products are limited to competing in a single state, the bulk are.

To this point, the role the  federal antitrust laws (or state for that matter) can play in shaping the cannabis industry has not been tested.  That day may be on the horizon, however, as some companies continue to grow into industry giants, while others struggle to compete.  Cannabis space participants, especially the larger players, should be aware of the compliance measures taken in other industries to protect themselves from the possibility of antitrust claims brought by their competitors or consumers.

© 2009- Duane Morris LLP. Duane Morris is a registered service mark of Duane Morris LLP.

The opinions expressed on this blog are those of the author and are not to be construed as legal advice.

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