Tag Archives: Jennifer Briggs Fisher

Courts Confront Clash Between Federal and State Marijuana Laws

The clash between state and federal law regarding the use of medical marijuana continues to present an ongoing dilemma for courts around the country, as illustrated by a recent decision by the Eighth Circuit. In the United States v. Schostag, the Eighth Circuit affirmed a decision by the District Court of Minnesota barring a felon from using state-legal medical marijuana while he is on supervised release. Continue reading Courts Confront Clash Between Federal and State Marijuana Laws

Jennifer Fisher and Justin Santarosa

California Department of Public Health’s Re-Adopted Emergency Regulations

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) is the state agency designated under the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA) as responsible for regulating cannabis manufacturing.

The CDPH issued emergency regulations for manufacturers in November 2017, and has now proposed readopting those regulations for another 180 days. Based on feedback from the public and stakeholders in the industry, the CDPH has proposed some changes to these regulations.

This blog post will highlight the changes to the CDPH emergency regulations and identify key issues for manufacturers. In separate posts, we will be describing the changes made by the California Department of Food and Agriculture and the California Bureau of Cannabis Control.

Changes to Emergency Regulations:

  • The CDPH has removed the distinction of A and M Licenses and now only requires one application and applicants will only have to pay one licensing fee. Previously you had to submit two applications and pay two separate licensing fees if you wanted to operate in the medicinal and adult-use market.
  • The readopted regulations have now incorporated the previously released shared-use facility regulations, which allow a manufacturing premises to be used my multiple businesses that take turns utilizing the space and equipment. This allows for operations similar to a commercial kitchen or agreements in which larger manufacturers offer space and use of equipment to smaller manufacturers.
  • The CDPH has removed tinctures from the definition of a product containing more than 0.5% alcohol by volume. However, tinctures cannot be sold in a package larger than two fluid ounces and shall include a calibrated dropper or other measuring device

The change to only a single application for both medical and adult-use is a welcome change for manufacturing businesses. Overall, the CDPH did not make significant changes to its regulations.

If you have any questions about the regulations, please contact Jennifer Briggs Fisher in our San Francisco office or Justin Santarosa in our Los Angeles office.

 

Jennifer Fisher and Justin Santarosa

Bureau of Cannabis Control’s Re-Adopted Emergency Regulations

The Bureau of Cannabis Control is the state agency designated under the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA) as responsible for issuing licenses to and regulating distributors, retailers, delivery-only retailers, microbusinesses, and testing labs.

The BCC issued emergency regulations in November 2017, and has now proposed readopting those regulations for another 180 days. Based on feedback from the public and stakeholders in the industry, the BCC has proposed some changes to these regulations.

This blog post will highlight the changes to the BCC emergency regulations and identify key issues for distributors, retailers, delivery-only retailers, microbusinesses, and testing labs. In separate posts, we will be describing the changes made by the California Department of Food and Agriculture and the California Department of Public Health. Those posts can be found here and here.

Changes to Emergency Regulations:

  • The BCC has removed the distinction of A and M Licenses and now only requires one application and applicants will only have to pay one licensing fee. Additionally, license fees have been reduced. Previously you had to submit two applications and pay two separate licensing fees if you wanted to operate in the medicinal and adult-use market.
  • A delivery employee may now complete multiple deliveries of cannabis goods if they are prepared by the retailer prior to the delivery employee leaving the licensed premises. The total amount of cannabis goods in the delivery vehicle may be up to $10,000, the previous limit was set at $3,000.
  • The definition of owner has been amended to specify that the chief executive officer and/or the members of the board of directors of any entity that own 20% or more of a commercial cannabis business will be considered “owners.”
  • The definition of financial interests has been amended to include “an agreement to receive a portion of the profits of a commercial cannabis business.” Commercial cannabis business and service providers will have to review their agreements and applications to determine if certain amendments will need to be made to include other people or businesses as having a “financial interest” in a commercial cannabis business. Interestingly, this change was not made in the definition of “financial interest” under the CDFA and CDPH regulations.
  • Retail stores may not sell or deliver cannabis goods through a drive-through or pass-out window and sales cannot be made to people within motor vehicles.
  • License applications must now include:
    • Cannabis waste procedures; and
    • Delivery procedures, if applicable.

These changes show that the BCC and the other regulatory agencies are being responsive to their stakeholders and while not all changes are positive, we believe this is a step in the right direction for cannabis businesses in California.If you have any questions about the regulations, please contact Jennifer Briggs Fisher in our San Francisco office or Justin Santarosa in our Los Angeles office.

Jennifer Fisher and Justin Santarosa

California’s Re-Adopted Emergency Regulations – What Cannabis Cultivators Need to Know

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA), through its CalCannabis Cultivation Licensing division, is the state agency designated under the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA) as responsible for issuing licenses to commercial cannabis cultivators in California.

The CDFA issued emergency regulations for cannabis cultivators in November 2017, and has now proposed readopting those regulations for another 180 days. Based on feedback from the public and stakeholders in the industry, the CDFA has proposed some changes to these regulations.

This blog post will highlight the changes to the CDFA emergency regulations and identify key issues for cannabis cultivators. In separate posts, we will be describing the changes made by the Bureau of Cannabis Control and the California Department of Public Health. Click here for those updates. Continue reading California’s Re-Adopted Emergency Regulations – What Cannabis Cultivators Need to Know

Jennifer Fisher and Justin Santarosa

California Cannabis Licensing Authorities To Readopt Emergency Regulations with Proposed Changes

California’s three cannabis licensing authorities, the Bureau of Cannabis Control, California Department of Public Health and California Department of Food and Agriculture, have proposed readopting their emergency regulations currently in effect for another 180 days.  Since the original regulations were released in November 2017, representatives from the three agencies have been soliciting feedback from stakeholders and the public.  As a result of that process, some changes are being made to the emergency regulations.  Continue reading California Cannabis Licensing Authorities To Readopt Emergency Regulations with Proposed Changes

Duane Morris Hosts Women Grow Networking Event with San Francisco Office of Cannabis Director Nicole Elliott

On Thursday, March 8, 2018, Duane Morris hosted the Bay Area Women Grow Signature Networking Event in our San Francisco office.  Our panel speakers included Duane Morris partner Jennifer Briggs Fisher, who specializes in providing regulatory and compliance advice to cannabis companies, and Nicole Elliott, the Director of the San Francisco Office of Cannabis.  The panel was moderated by Women Grow Co-Founder Jazmin Hupp.

Our panel speakers addressed the cannabis business permitting process in San Francisco, the equity applicant program, requirements for licenses from the State of California, and legal and compliance considerations for cannabis businesses.  It was a fantastic way to celebrate International Women’s Day!

“Cannabis 101” Webinar Replay Available

A video replay of the webinar Cannabis 101: Update on the Federal Enforcement & State Regulatory Environment is available to view.

The webinar covers the topics:

  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ Memo Rescinding the Cole Memo—What Has Changed?
  • How Federal Enforcement Works from the Perspective of a Former Federal Prosecutor
  • Federal Legislative Update—Congressional Attempts to Protect the Cannabis Industry
  • State Regulatory Actions and How Courts Are Interpreting Cannabis Regulations

Watch above in the embedded viewer, or go to the event page to watch the replay.

Jennifer Fisher and Justin Santarosa

What Distributors Need to Know About California’s Emergency Cannabis Regulations

On November 16, 2017, the California Bureau of Cannabis Control published emergency regulations governing both the medical and the adult-use cannabis industries in California. Below are the highlights of the emergency regulations and how they may impact distributors of cannabis products.

This post is the fourth in a series of entries on the Duane Morris Cannabis Industry blog that will provide an analysis of the new California emergency regulations. If you have any questions about the regulations, please contact Jennifer Briggs Fisher in our San Francisco office or Justin Santarosa in our Los Angeles office. Continue reading What Distributors Need to Know About California’s Emergency Cannabis Regulations

San Francisco Adopts New Rules for Recreational Cannabis

San Francisco Adopts New Rules for Recreational Cannabis

After months of debate and consideration, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved new regulations for recreational cannabis activity yesterday. The legislation will come back to the Board next week for a final vote and then will go to San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee to sign it into law. Highlights of the new regulations are outlined below.

Existing Medical Dispensaries Allowed to Sell Recreational Cannabis

Beginning on January 5, 2018, existing medical dispensaries and delivery services currently operating in San Francisco will be allowed to sell recreational cannabis. The existing cannabis dispensaries must obtain a temporary 120-day license in order to participate in recreational cannabis sales.

Continue reading San Francisco Adopts New Rules for Recreational Cannabis

Jennifer Fisher and Justin Santarosa

How California’s Emergency Cannabis Regulations Affect Dispensaries

On November 16, 2017, the California Bureau of Cannabis Control published emergency regulations governing both the medical and the adult-use cannabis industries in California. Below are the highlights of the emergency regulations and how they may impact adult-use and/or medicinal retailers, or dispensaries as they are more commonly known.

This post is the third in a series of entries on the Duane Morris Cannabis Industry blog that will provide an analysis of the new California emergency regulations. If you have any questions about the regulations, please contact Jennifer Briggs Fisher in our San Francisco office or Justin Santarosa in our Los Angeles office.  Continue reading How California’s Emergency Cannabis Regulations Affect Dispensaries