Tag Archives: vape

Oregon Court Stays Ban of Flavored E-Vaping Products

On September 26, 2019, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health warning to Oregon citizens “urging people to immediately stop using all vaping products.”  Shortly thereafter, on October 3, 2019, Gov. Kate Brown issued Executive Order 19-09.  EO 19-09 directed the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to adopt emergency rules banning the sale of all flavored vaping products for 180 days.

In response, on October 11, 2019, the OHA and OLCC issued temporary rules that banned all flavored vaping product sales in the state.  In a statement announcing the emergency rules, the agencies explained that “[t]he ban covers all tobacco and cannabis (marijuana and hemp) vaping products that contain natural or artificial flavors . . . [t]obacco-flavored tobacco or nicotine products, as well as marijuana-flavored marijuana or THC products that use only marijuana-derived flavorings, including terpenes, are not included in the ban.”  The ban was set to take effect on October 15, 2019, and last for six months.

However, a group of vaping-related businesses filed suit in Oregon state court, seeking judicial review of the emergency rule.  On October 17, 2019, the Oregon Court of Appeals issued an Order that temporarily stayed the enforcement of these rules, pending the court’s ultimate decision on the matter.  Vapor Technology Association, et al. v. Oregon Health Authority, No. A172417 (Or. Ct. App., Oct. 17, 2019).

This stay comes just days after a Michigan court issued a preliminary injunction to prohibit a similar emergency ban from taking effect.  Over the past several weeks states throughout the country, including Rhode Island, Washington, and Montana have issued similar bans on flavored vaping products. New York’s contemplated ban on menthol-flavored nicotine vaping products was put on hold following a temporary stay on the ban issued by a court. These recent court decisions staying and enjoining such bans indicate that additional challenges may be forthcoming in those jurisdictions and any others that institute similar bans.

Cannabis Vaping Health Claims Should Be Taken Seriously by the Cannabis Product Supply Chain

Seth Goldberg
Seth A. Goldberg

Yesterday, I blogged about a Washington Post article that reported that vitamin E acetate in marijuana vaping products is being considered as possibly being linked to alleged vaping related lung injuries.  I cautioned cannabis manufacturers, processors and dispensaries, i.e., the cannabis supply chain, that articles like WP’s, which referred to vitamin E acetate in cannabis vapor as a “contaminant,” could be the impetus for product liability lawsuits.

Today, WP provided an update to yesterday’s article.  WP now states as many as 450 vaping illness cases have been reported across 33 states.  Up from yesterday’s report of 250 cases across 25 states.  WP’s new article refers to the vaping related health claims as possible a “new lung disease” based on a study by the New England Journal of Medicine that reports about a possible lung disorder being experienced by certain consumers of vape.    However,  WP appears to acknowledge  scientists have not yet identified a specific chemical in vape, or whether vaping of nicotine or marijuana, is resulting in an increased risk of the lung disorder reported by NEJM.  Indeed, scientific research and investigation is needed in this area.

Nevertheless, as I explained yesterday, having represented pharmaceutical companies in product liability matters involving alleged “contaminants,” product liability lawsuits are often, if not usually, filed without any scientific proof of injury causation.   Accordingly, the cannabis supply chain should be careful to ensure the safety of their products, and implement necessary compliance measures.

Likewise, cannabis consumers should be mindful that many of the reports of vaping related health issues concern “black market” vape products, not those manufactured by state-licensed cannabis companies who are required by law to maintain strict standards for their products.

 

Will Cannabis Vaping Lead to Products Liability Lawsuits?

Seth Goldberg
Seth A. Goldberg

Today, the Washington Post reported that federal and state regulators have identified the chemical vitamin E acetate as being contained in certain cannabis vaping products allegedly linked to lung injuries.  According to WP,  215 cases possibly arising out of cannabis vapes containing the chemical have been reported in 25 states, and two deaths have been linked to marijuana vaping.

WP refers to vitamin E acetate in cannabis vapor as a “contaminant,” which is a loaded term that could get the attention of the plaintiffs’ product liability bar.   Articles like this are often the impetus for lawsuits to be filed.  Consequently, products’ liability claims may soon become a reality for the cannabis vape supply chain.

However, as even the WP article makes clear, whether vitamin E acetate in marijuana vapor can cause an increased risk of injury of any kind to vaping consumers is being investigated, and has not been proven.   The article also identifies the fact that many users of marijuana vape also vape nicotine, which is likely one of many confounding factors.  Thus, product liability claims asserting injuries from marijuana vaping brought now are likely to be unsupported by science.

Nevertheless, those in the cannabis supply chain, e.g., manufacturers, processors, and sellers,  should be aware of the likelihood of such claims, as product liability claims are often asserted without any scientific evidence of causation.   Those in the supply chain should know that a range of compliance measures can be implemented to better protect against against such claims.