David N. Feldman

Trump’s Order on Reducing Regulations Does Not Apply to the SEC

On January 30, Pres. Trump issued an executive order that for every new regulation proposed, an agency must eliminate two old regulations. The order also requires the net cost of a new regulation to be zero after taking into account cost savings from regulations eliminated. Military and national security regulations are exempt from the order. The head of the Office of Management and Budget also is allowed to make exceptions. In signing the order, the President was surrounded by small business leaders, and said, “We’re cutting regulations massively for small business … that’s what this is about today.”

Many in the capital markets space feared this could hamper the SEC’s rulemaking process, as some “new regulations” can actually reduce regulatory burdens. For example, many have sought to convince the SEC to expand the use of short form registration on Form S-3 to all reporting companies – which would enhance opportunities for capital formation but would require a new regulation. Thankfully, last week the White House issued interim guidance on the order. Among other things, it said the order does not apply to “independent agencies” (ie those that are outside the federal executive departments), which includes the SEC.

A number of liberal groups filed a lawsuit last week to challenge the order, saying it forces agencies to be arbitrary, and that the order was outside the President’s powers. They are seeking an injunction to kill the order. Many, frankly, are scratching their heads over this order. Even those who strongly support easing business regulation are not sure this is the best way to do it. At least the SEC (and most of the finance-related agencies) may move forward in its usual manner.