Tag Archives: Congress

David N. Feldman

SEC Confirms Reg A+ Issuers Can Defer Some Financial Reporting Even When Seeking Exchange Listing

The Regulation A+ rules adopted by the SEC in 2015 included scaled reporting obligations to assist in reducing issuers’ offering costs as against a traditional IPO. However, if a company is seeking to become a full Securities Exchange Act reporting company, which is required if it is planning a national exchange listing, its disclosure must follow traditional IPO Form S-1 level disclosure, without the benefit of scaling. The one exception: even these companies may utilize financial statements that are up to nine months old. Normally in a Form S-1 your financials cannot be more than 135 days “stale.” Last month, the SEC and Nasdaq permitted Chicken Soup for the Soul Entertainment Inc. to go public, trade on Nasdaq and complete its Reg A+ offering with no financial information from 2017.  The other three Reg A+ issuers that have completed IPOs onto national exchanges utilized financials that were no more than 135 days old.

The unanswered question, however, was this: is a company that does not have “current” financials in its Regulation A+ offering documents immediately out of compliance with reporting obligations right after it becomes a full reporting company upon completion of the IPO? The SEC answered this in a positive way last week with several Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations (C&DIs). The answer: if you have missing quarterly reports on Form 10-Q when you finish your IPO, you are given 45 days from then to file them. If you are missing an annual report on Form 10-K, you have 90 days to complete that.

This small piece of guidance adds another substantial cost-saving benefit to Reg A+. The ability to defer the preparation and reporting of four and one-half months of financial information beyond what Form S-1 would require allows a company to deal with that cost after it raises money in its IPO, if it is comfortable that the scaled disclosure will not impede the ability to complete the fundraising and IPO.

David N. Feldman

House Overwhelmingly Passes Bill to Allow Reporting Companies to Use Reg A+

HR 2864, the “Improving Access to Capital Act,” passed the US House of Representatives on September 5, 2017 with a lopsided bipartisan vote of 403-3. The short bill directs the SEC to permit full Securities Exchange Act reporting companies to use Regulation A+ for a public offering. Previously, only non-reporting companies could utilize the new streamlined approach with unlimited testing the waters capabilities.

Some smaller companies trading in the over-the-counter markets have been contemplating suspending their SEC reporting obligations to be able to move forward with a Reg A+ offering. If this bill passes the Senate and is signed by Pres. Trump, that would no longer be necessary. The bill makes clear that the company would be deemed to satisfy the post-offering reporting obligations under Reg A+ so long as they continue with full quarterly and other reporting required of most Exchange Act reporting companies.

As a practical matter, this change would only help companies trading in the over-the-counter markets with under $75 million market capitalization, companies that went public in the last year or those that have not made recent filings on a timely basis, since all others have some ability to utilize short registration Form S-3, which is a very simple and quick process even compared with Reg A+. It also avoids the limits on the value of shares that can be registered on Form S-3 for smaller exchange listed companies. But help it would.

David N. Feldman

Financial CHOICE Act Would Broaden Form S-3 Availability

On May 4, 2017, the House Financial Services Committee, by a vote of 34-26, passed the Financial CHOICE Act of 2017, which now moves to the full House. Most of the bill relates to rollbacks of Dodd-Frank provisions that relate primarily to issues affecting large financial institutions. Among other things it would repeal the Volcker Rule which prohibits banks from doing proprietary trading and sponsoring hedge and private equity funds.

One small section of the summary of the bill is called “Capital Formation.” The Committee’s summary of the bill praises the ideas that come out of the annual SEC small business conference and criticizes the SEC for its slow implementation of the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act of 2012. But they noted tremendous benefit coming out of the JOBS Act rollout and added more goodies to the bill to enhance capital formation opportunities.

Most important, the bill would allow all SEC reporting companies to use short registration Form S-3, which could be a tremendous help for over-the-counter issuers current in their filings. It also would exempt emerging growth and smaller reporting companies from burdensome XBRL financial reporting rules.

The bill also requires the SEC to formally respond to each recommendation from the small business conference and disclose what action, if any, it is taking in response. It also eliminates the requirement of a broker-dealer or funding portal in JOBS Act Title III crowdfunding under certain circumstances. It is not yet clear whether the bill is likely to pass; we will continue to monitor its progress.

David N. Feldman

Flash: Obama Signs New Small Business Initiatives Into Law

They got tucked into a transportation bill (Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act or the FAST Act), but with a deft set of amendments the Reforming Access for Investments in Startup Enterprises Act of 2015 (or the RAISE Act) and other small business initiatives were signed by the President on December 4, 2015 and are now law. The new law also includes a direction to the SEC to change Form S-1 to allow forward incorporation by reference in filings by smaller reporting companies. This is a big and positive change for companies not eligible to use short form registration on Form S-3.

The RAISE Act assures an exemption from SEC registration for a resale of a security to an accredited investor who has access to certain information from the company, no bad actors or shells allowed, no general solicitation or advertising, no start-up companies and the class of stock being sold has to have existed for at least 90 days. This eliminates the old awkward invented Securities Act Section 4(1-1/2) exemption which was used in practice and accepted by the SEC but actually nowhere in the statute. This could help add comfort to secondary market folks who help people buy pre-IPO stocks like Facebook and Twitter before they go public. It could also help PIPE (private investment in public equity) investors who wish to transfer their shares more confidently in a private transaction before they would otherwise be eligible to sell the shares publicly.

Other very exciting changes in the law:

  • mandating the SEC look to ease disclosure burdens on smaller companies, to study ways to improve and simplify disclosure rules, and reduced disclosure for emerging growth companies.
  • lengthening the time you can keep your IPO filing confidential under the JOBS Act to 15 days before the first road show (from 21 days)
  • permitting a JOBS Act IPO filing to exclude financials that are likely to go stale by the time of the actual offering.
  • allowing an emerging growth company to still be treated like one through its JOBS Act IPO even if it stops being an EGC during the process.

Thanks House Financial Services Committee for pushing these through the “I’m Just a Bill” process!