Tag Archives: crowdfunding

David N. Feldman

Financial CHOICE Act Would Broaden Form S-3 Availability

On May 4, 2017, the House Financial Services Committee, by a vote of 34-26, passed the Financial CHOICE Act of 2017, which now moves to the full House. Most of the bill relates to rollbacks of Dodd-Frank provisions that relate primarily to issues affecting large financial institutions. Among other things it would repeal the Volcker Rule which prohibits banks from doing proprietary trading and sponsoring hedge and private equity funds.

One small section of the summary of the bill is called “Capital Formation.” The Committee’s summary of the bill praises the ideas that come out of the annual SEC small business conference and criticizes the SEC for its slow implementation of the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act of 2012. But they noted tremendous benefit coming out of the JOBS Act rollout and added more goodies to the bill to enhance capital formation opportunities.

Most important, the bill would allow all SEC reporting companies to use short registration Form S-3, which could be a tremendous help for over-the-counter issuers current in their filings. It also would exempt emerging growth and smaller reporting companies from burdensome XBRL financial reporting rules.

The bill also requires the SEC to formally respond to each recommendation from the small business conference and disclose what action, if any, it is taking in response. It also eliminates the requirement of a broker-dealer or funding portal in JOBS Act Title III crowdfunding under certain circumstances. It is not yet clear whether the bill is likely to pass; we will continue to monitor its progress.

David N. Feldman

SEC Completes JOBS & FAST Act Rulemakings

Last week the SEC proudly announced the completion of its rulemaking obligations under the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act of 2012 and the mini-JOBS Act 2.0 tacked onto the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act. The last rules had to do with implementing the increase in the number of shareholders triggering an obligation to become a full SEC reporting company. They also spent lots of time on the Regulation A+ rules and new Regulation CF for “statutory” crowdfunding which are also complete. CF is just days away from being effective, the Reg A+ rules have been in effect almost a year now.

There is other work still pending under JOBS. For example, the SEC recently put out a 300+ page concept release talking about ideas to modernize some of the disclosure requirements in SEC Regulation S-K. The JOBS Act mandates that they examine this and hopefully implement some changes. One of the most interesting, which I’ve been pushing for years: let’s allow smaller public companies to eliminate burdensome disclosure requirements if they are not material to an investor’s understanding of the company. This is similar to SEC rules for disclosure in private companies to non-accredited investors. But this is still developing.

The last rule change? Per the SEC release, “As a result of JOBS Act and FAST Act changes, an issuer that is not a bank, bank holding company or savings and loan holding company is required to register a class of equity securities under the Exchange Act if it has more than $10 million of total assets and the securities are ‘held of record’ by either 2,000 persons, or 500 persons who are not accredited investors.  An issuer that is a bank, bank holding company or savings and loan holding company is required to register a class of equity securities if it has more than $10 million of total assets and the securities are ‘held of record’ by 2,000 or more persons.” This is good.

Give Us Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Companies Seeking Capital… The JOBS Act: A New Path to Prosperity or an Opening for Securities Fraud?

After years of (perhaps excessive) regulation aimed at promoting transparency and accountability, the JOBS Act, signed by the President and overwhelmingly passed by Congress, undoes many of these requirements for companies that have the least experience in providing appropriate information upon which an investor can base its investment decision. It may also open the gateway for investors who arguably aren’t armed with the financial knowledge to protect themselves – they may just put it all on red and let it ride.

Continue reading Give Us Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Companies Seeking Capital… The JOBS Act: A New Path to Prosperity or an Opening for Securities Fraud?