Tag Archives: Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act

David N. Feldman

SEC Confirms Reg A+ Issuers Can Defer Some Financial Reporting Even When Seeking Exchange Listing

The Regulation A+ rules adopted by the SEC in 2015 included scaled reporting obligations to assist in reducing issuers’ offering costs as against a traditional IPO. However, if a company is seeking to become a full Securities Exchange Act reporting company, which is required if it is planning a national exchange listing, its disclosure must follow traditional IPO Form S-1 level disclosure, without the benefit of scaling. The one exception: even these companies may utilize financial statements that are up to nine months old. Normally in a Form S-1 your financials cannot be more than 135 days “stale.” Last month, the SEC and Nasdaq permitted Chicken Soup for the Soul Entertainment Inc. to go public, trade on Nasdaq and complete its Reg A+ offering with no financial information from 2017.  The other three Reg A+ issuers that have completed IPOs onto national exchanges utilized financials that were no more than 135 days old.

The unanswered question, however, was this: is a company that does not have “current” financials in its Regulation A+ offering documents immediately out of compliance with reporting obligations right after it becomes a full reporting company upon completion of the IPO? The SEC answered this in a positive way last week with several Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations (C&DIs). The answer: if you have missing quarterly reports on Form 10-Q when you finish your IPO, you are given 45 days from then to file them. If you are missing an annual report on Form 10-K, you have 90 days to complete that.

This small piece of guidance adds another substantial cost-saving benefit to Reg A+. The ability to defer the preparation and reporting of four and one-half months of financial information beyond what Form S-1 would require allows a company to deal with that cost after it raises money in its IPO, if it is comfortable that the scaled disclosure will not impede the ability to complete the fundraising and IPO.

David N. Feldman

Bill Would Allow Reporting Companies to Use Reg A+

The House Financial Services Committee recently approved a bill that would permit full SEC reporting companies to use Tier 2 of Regulation A+ to effect a streamlined, lower cost public offering of their securities. The bill now moves to the full House. In implementing rules under the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act in 2015, the SEC retained the historical restriction that only non-reporting companies could utilize Reg A. There was really no particular reason this could not have been changed.

Now that practitioners have witnessed the closing of well over 30 Reg A+ deals, three of which are now successfully trading on national exchanges, it would seem logical to expand the availability of Reg A+ to reporting companies. They would have a history of full disclosure, and could clearly benefit from utilizing a faster and cheaper option to raise money from the public. OTC Markets, Inc. had submitted a petition several years ago that encouraged this, and Duane Morris submitted a letter to the SEC in support of that petition. Presumably this would only benefit companies that are not eligible for short registration Form S-3, including companies with less than a $75 million market cap and trading over-the-counter.

As noted in Crowdfund Insider, the new Republican-led SEC could, on its own, simply implement this change and avoid the need for Congress to pass a bill. There are some questions to address, however, such as would the relaxed financial reporting requirements apply before the offering is approved by the SEC? Would the testing the waters rules be the same? It will be interesting to see if this develops further.

David N. Feldman

SEC Reopens the Front Door for Small Cap Listings as First Regulation A+ IPO Trades on National Exchange

Duane Morris client Myomo Inc., a medical robotics company, completed its initial public offering on June 9, 2017 under SEC Regulation A+ created under the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act of 2012. The historic deal is the first Reg A+ IPO to be listed on a national exchange. In the IPO, Myomo raised a total of approximately $8 million between the public offering and a contemporaneous private offering of investment units. The stock commenced trading with the symbol “MYO” on the NYSE MKT on Monday, June 12, 2017.

For various reasons that have been studied extensively, smaller company IPOs, which proliferated in the 1990s, nearly disappeared starting around 2000. Other alternatives, including reverse mergers, often called “back door listings” because they are completed without advance SEC review, took their place until 2011 when the SEC added significant regulatory burdens to these transactions. A movement to update Regulation A to “reopen the front door” at the SEC started at the annual SEC small business conference in 2010.

Regulation A reforms were then included in Title IV of the JOBS Act. The law significantly increased the amount which a company can raise under what we now call Reg A+ from $5 million to $50 million and fully preempted all state “blue sky” review of those offerings, relieving significant regulatory and cost burdens. The final Reg A+ rules passed by the SEC under the JOBS Act also broadened the ability of Reg A+ issuers to “test the waters” with all potential investors both before and after filing their offering statement with the SEC. In addition, non-listed companies have somewhat scaled disclosure in their IPO as compared to a traditional registration.

The Reg A+ rules also permit non-listed companies a “light reporting” option after their IPO, further reducing costs and burdens as a public company while retaining strong investor protections. The SEC also has given extremely limited review to these filings, and has reported an average of 74 days from initial filing to SEC approval or “qualification.” As a result, companies are reporting a speedier, more cost-efficient and simpler process in completing their Reg A+ offerings than with traditional IPOs.

To date, the SEC has reported that dozens of Reg A+ deals have been consummated and hundreds of millions of dollars raised since the SEC’s final rules were implemented in 2015. Only a handful of these companies, however, have commenced trading their stock. To have completed the first Reg A+ deal to trade on a national exchange, therefore, is a very significant development for those working to redevelop a strong new IPO market for smaller companies.

David N. Feldman

Flash: Obama Signs New Small Business Initiatives Into Law

They got tucked into a transportation bill (Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act or the FAST Act), but with a deft set of amendments the Reforming Access for Investments in Startup Enterprises Act of 2015 (or the RAISE Act) and other small business initiatives were signed by the President on December 4, 2015 and are now law. The new law also includes a direction to the SEC to change Form S-1 to allow forward incorporation by reference in filings by smaller reporting companies. This is a big and positive change for companies not eligible to use short form registration on Form S-3.

The RAISE Act assures an exemption from SEC registration for a resale of a security to an accredited investor who has access to certain information from the company, no bad actors or shells allowed, no general solicitation or advertising, no start-up companies and the class of stock being sold has to have existed for at least 90 days. This eliminates the old awkward invented Securities Act Section 4(1-1/2) exemption which was used in practice and accepted by the SEC but actually nowhere in the statute. This could help add comfort to secondary market folks who help people buy pre-IPO stocks like Facebook and Twitter before they go public. It could also help PIPE (private investment in public equity) investors who wish to transfer their shares more confidently in a private transaction before they would otherwise be eligible to sell the shares publicly.

Other very exciting changes in the law:

  • mandating the SEC look to ease disclosure burdens on smaller companies, to study ways to improve and simplify disclosure rules, and reduced disclosure for emerging growth companies.
  • lengthening the time you can keep your IPO filing confidential under the JOBS Act to 15 days before the first road show (from 21 days)
  • permitting a JOBS Act IPO filing to exclude financials that are likely to go stale by the time of the actual offering.
  • allowing an emerging growth company to still be treated like one through its JOBS Act IPO even if it stops being an EGC during the process.

Thanks House Financial Services Committee for pushing these through the “I’m Just a Bill” process!