Tag Archives: Federal Rules of Civil Procedure Amendment

Delaware’s War Against the “Boilerplate [Objection] Plague” Goes National

By: Oderah C. Nwaeze & Mackenzie M. Wrobel

In almost every lawsuit, as part of the discovery process, the parties will exchange information relevant to the claims and defenses at issue.  Discovery, however, is rarely as easy or collaborative as it should be.  To the contrary, parties routinely will refuse to produce materials responsive to well-tailored discovery requests without offering anything more than rote, unspecific responses to explain their tenuous positions.  In most cases, the objecting party ultimately will produce the requested documents, but only after forcing its opponent to waste time and money exchanging correspondence and participating in meet and confers.  Recognizing this unnecessary strain on resources, Delaware courts have spent the better part of a decade waging a not-so-quiet war on boilerplate objections.

Leading the charge on that front are jurists from the Delaware Court of Chancery, who refuse to allow parties to withhold discovery based on the limited details found in formulaic objections.  See Transcript of Motion to Compel Argument, Lake Treasure Hldgs. Ltd. v. Foundry Hill GP, C.A. No. 6546-VCL (Sept. 11, 2012) (“Lake Tr. at __”); Transcript of Motion to Compel Argument, Glidepath, Ltd., et al. v. Beumer Corp. et al., C.A. No. 12220-VCL (Del. Ch. Oct. 6, 2016) (“Glidepath Tr. at __”).  The Court has emphasized that the point of discovery responses is for the objecting party to detail for its adversary “what [it is] planning not to do” and why.  Lake Tr. at 22.  Otherwise, parties will waste time and money engaging in letter writing campaigns in order to flesh out objections that should have been described in the “first response.”  Lake Tr. at 22; see also Hammer v. Howard Medical, Inc., 2017 WL 1167550 (Del. Super. Feb. 14, 2017) (Stokes, J.) (granting a motion for sanctions, fees, costs against an objecting party for the continued use of general “irrelevant” or “not applicable” objections to interrogatories despite the requesting party’s efforts to seek clarification through correspondence and motion practice).

Continue reading Delaware’s War Against the “Boilerplate [Objection] Plague” Goes National