Post-MoCRA Regulatory Compliance Checklist for Beauty and Personal Care Products

MoCRA, Pub. L. No. 117-328, represents the first major statutory change to the authority of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to regulate cosmetics since the Food, Drug, and Cosmetics Act (FDCA), 21 U.S.C. § 361 et seq.,
in 1938 and the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act (FPLA), 21 C.F.R. § 701.3, in 1966.

This checklist outlines key regulatory compliance considerations that are specific to personal care products marketed in the United States following the enactment of the federal Modernization of Cosmetics Regulation Act (MoCRA) on December 23, 2022.

To read the full text of this Lexis Nexis Practical Guidance Checklist by Duane Morris attorneys Driscoll UgarteRick BallAlyson LotmanKelly Bonner and Coleen Hill, please visit the firm website.

US FDA Seeks Head of Human Foods, Looks to Move Cosmetics Work

Duane Morris attorney Kelly Bonner was quoted in an article in Chemical Watch on March 3.

“The US Food and Drug Administration has started its search for a deputy commissioner for its new human foods programme, and plans to move certain cosmetics functions to another part of the agency to advance oversight of the products. […]

The inclusion of cosmetics in the proposed restructuring is “very significant”, said Kelly Bonner, associate with law firm Duane Morris. Continue reading “US FDA Seeks Head of Human Foods, Looks to Move Cosmetics Work”

MoCRA Is Here — Now What? Unpacking Litigation and Regulatory Risk for Cosmetics Brands Following MoCRA’s Enactment

On December 23, 2022, Congress enacted the first major statutory change to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s ability to regulate cosmetics since the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA). Passed with bipartisan and industry support, the Modernization of Cosmetics Regulation Act (MoCRA) significantly expands FDA’s rulemaking and enforcement authority over cosmetics and creates substantial new compliance obligations for manufacturers, packers, and distributors of cosmetics intended for sale in the United States.

Although MoCRA establishes several new requirements concerning product safety, it provides comparatively little guidance on the kinds of marketing or promotional claims brands can now make about the safety of their products.

To read the full text of this article by Duane Morris attorneys  Rick Ball, Alyson Walker Lotman and Kelly Bonner, please visit the Duane Morris website.

New York Bans Animal Testing on Cosmetics

By Ethan Feldman and Kelly Bonner

On January 1, 2023, New York became the tenth state to ban the sale of cosmetics tested on animals.

The New York Cruelty Free Cosmetic Act (“NYCFCA”), which took effect on January 1, 2023, prohibits manufacturers from importing for profit, selling, or offering to sell any cosmetic or ingredient in the state for which the manufacturer knew or reasonably should have known that animal testing was performed by or on behalf of the manufacturer, or manufacturer’s supplier, if the animal testing was conducted after January 1, 2023. Continue reading “New York Bans Animal Testing on Cosmetics”

Legal Risks Of Anti-Aging Claims Highlighted by L’Oreal Case

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a woman over 30 must be in want of an eye cream. Or a serum. Or anything, really, so long as it recreates the appearance of youth, vitality or an actual night’s sleep.

The global market for anti-aging cosmetics is expected to reach $93.1 billion by 2027. But as illustrated by a recent decision from the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, Lopez v. L’Oréal USA Inc., promises that a product can turn back time by “restoring skin” or “promot[ing] cell regeneration” can prove costly for brands looking to capitalize on this growing market.

Brands should be mindful of litigation and regulatory risk when making certain anti-aging claims.

To read the full text of this article by Duane Morris associate Kelly Bonner, which was originally published in Law360, please visit the firm website.

Efforts To Dismiss BIPA Claims Involving Virtual Try-On Technology Rejected by Illinois Federal Court

In a significant decision for retailers, Judge Manish Shah of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois recently denied in part Defendant Estée Lauder’s motion to dismiss proposed class action claims that its consumer “try-on” technology violated the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”).  The Court rejected Defendant’s personal jurisdiction argument, as well as claims that its website terms and conditions required Plaintiff to arbitrate her dispute, and that Plaintiff lacked standing to sue on behalf individuals that used websites Plaintiff herself did not visit. In a decision entitled Kukovec v. The Estée Lauder Companies, Inc., Case No. 22-CV-1988 (N.D. Ill.), the Court determined, however, that Plaintiff did not sufficiently plead that the cosmetics giant intentionally or recklessly violated consumers’ biometric privacy rights, and thereby dismissed those claims.  The ruling in Kukovec illustrates the ongoing legal risks for retailers in using “try-on” tech to enhance customer service.

To read the full text of this post by Gerald L. Maatman, Jr., Gregory Tsonis and Kelly Bonner, please visit the Duane Morris Class Action Defense Blog.

Blockchain and NFTs Are Smart, but Can They Revolutionise the Fashion Industry?

Following the worldwide disruption in retail due to COVID-19, sales of luxury goods are expected to grow as much as 25% in 2022. Much of this growth has been driven by e-commerce, with online sales totalling 23% of all luxury sales in 2020. Meanwhile, consumer sustainability demands have driven growth in luxury resale or rental markets, now worth an estimated $36 billion, while brands have expanded their reach into the brave new digital territory of the metaverse – the overlapping digital spaces in which we increasingly work, play, and consume.

Yet luxury’s digital embrace has been hampered by a concomitant rise in counterfeit goods in the physical and digital worlds.  Is blockchain the solution?

To read the full text of this article co-authored by Duane Morris attorneys Cindy Yang and Kelly Bonner, please visit the Multilaw website.

Personal Care Products Sector Gets Boost From New North American Trade Deal

On January 29, 2020, President Trump signed the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) into law, with key commitments impacting the personal care products sector.

The 2,082-page pact, which updates the 26-year-old North American Free Trade  Agreement (NAFTA), comes after more than two years of   negotiations, and was overwhelmingly ratified by the U.S. Senate on January 16, 2020.

Significantly, the USMCA contains a new Cosmetic Products Annex, which promotes greater regulatory compatibility and shared best regulatory practices in the personal care products sector.

Continue reading “Personal Care Products Sector Gets Boost From New North American Trade Deal”

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The opinions expressed on this blog are those of the author and are not to be construed as legal advice.

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