Category Archives: Vietnam – Energy

Energy projects regulations

Corporate direct renewable energy deals in Vietnam move closer

Corporate renewable power purchase deals are a step closer to reality in Vietnam following a proposal from the Ministry of Industry and Trade (MOIT) recommending the Prime Minister approve a so-called DPPA pilot project this year.   In Proposal 544 dated 21 Jan 2020, the MOIT gave its formal recommendation to the PM to approve a pilot program for between 400MW – 1,000 MW of wind and solar generation capacity and provided a draft PM Decision that would enact such a pilot and establish the process to implement and operate it.

[Click here for the original Vietnamese language version of Proposal 544 and the accompanying draft Decision and here for an unofficial English translation of the draft Decision.]

Duane Morris is the legal advisor to the USAID-funded Vietnam Low Emissions Energy Program (VLEEP) that has spent several years working closely with the MOIT, ERAV, investors and consumers to advocate for a DPPA pilot program and propose a specific design and parameters.  Among other things, Duane Morris developed an action plan to devise and implement a DPPA legal framework that fits within Vietnam’s existing electricity sector legislation and is developing template agreements for use by DPPA pilot project participants.

Enabling corporate power purchases is a major step forward to enable corporates to meet their clean power objectives in Vietnam, something hitherto all but impossible.  Vietnam is home to many RE100 investors and their supply chain counterparts and demand for direct procurement of verifiable clean energy is high.  At the same time, the specific DPPA design (a virtual or synthetic model) supports the continuing development of Vietnam’s relatively nascent competitive wholesale electricity market (VWEM) and has the potential to unlock greater private financing of new clean energy capacity at a time when private finance is needed more than ever.

If the PM approves the pilot program Vietnam will be in good company.  Corporate renewable power purchase deals are growing rapidly around the world and show no signs of slowing down.  Bloomberg has reported that corporations directly bought a record 20GW of wind and solar production in 2019, some 44% more than in 2018 and triple the number in 2017.  This was said to amount to more than 10% of all the renewable energy capacity added globally in 2019, at a build cost of some US$20-$30 billion.

While the majority of these deals were in the US, activity in other markets is gathering pace.  Vietnam’s enabling legislation, if approved by the PM, is likely to see strong interest here on both investor, and consumer sides of the equation.

According to the Bloomberg report, more than 80% of the 2019 deals were done using virtual PPA models (synthetic contracts) which is consistent with the model recommended by the MOIT to the PM in Vietnam.

The PM’s draft Decision contemplates renewable gencos participating directly in the VWEM and agreeing contracts for differences (CfDs) with consumers at agreed long-term strike prices.  Consumers are motivated to participate to meet sustainability goals, satisfy customer expectations and to hedge against long-term power price fluctuations.

The draft PM Decision recommended by the MOIT contemplates a process to implement the pilot project as follows:

  1. Within 15 working days from the date on which the formal DPPA Decision comes into effect (still TBC), MOIT will publicize the details of the pilot program.
  2. Within 15 working days thereafter, MOIT will open an e-application portal for interested DPPA program participants (both gencos and consumers).
  3. Interested participants will have 45 working days thereafter to prepare and submit applications.
  4. The MOIT will have a further 45 working days to assess, select and publish a list of participants.
  5. Participants will then have 180 working days to negotiate and execute necessary agreements, complete development of projects and achieve commercial operation (for participation in the wholesale market).

These steps and timelines will be subject to final approval of the PM in the formal Decision.  It is expected that further details re project application details and assessment criteria and process will be developed by the MOIT.

Contact us for further details about the proposed design of the DPPA pilot project, the agreements involved and the process to get involved as either genco investor or consumer offtaker.

For more information about Vietnam’s energy sector, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com or any of the lawyers in our office listing. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC, branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office and Asia lead for Duane Morris’ Energy Industry Group.

Crunch time for PM’s decision on solar FIT2

In a 6 Feb 2020 report to the PM, the MOIT shares views received from the Ministry of Justice and Ministry of Finance on the long-awaited new FIT regime for solar projects. Interestingly, a new option has emerged: that FIT 2 could apply to all projects approved in principle prior to 23 November 2019 and that reach COD by 31 December 2020. While December 2020 is still very close and thus a practical limit, this option is still markedly broader than the MOIT’s earlier proposal that only projects that had commenced construction (with very narrow criteria of what that means) prior to 23 November 2019 (and reach COD by 31 December 2020) should be entitled to FIT 2.

If the PM accepts this new option it would significantly increase the number of already-approved solar projects potentially eligible for FIT 2. that would be welcome news for approx. 40 projects currently in FIT limbo.

With this document, it appears that all involved ministries and other stakeholders such as EVN have been formally consulted and their opinions formally shared with the PM. The ball is firmly in the PM’s court now.

See the original text of the 6 Feb report here: FIT 2

For more information about Vietnam’s energy sector, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com or any of the lawyers in our office listing. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.

Narrow view of “under construction” may spell end of FiT goal for vast majority of Vietnam’s approved solar power projects

Only a tiny proportion of already-approved solar projects may qualify for Vietnam’s next feed in tariff (FiT 2) according to draft opinions from the MOIT.  If the Prime Minister agrees with the approach, many projects with already-signed PPAs, some in very advanced stages of development, look set to be forced into participating in tariff auctions or, worse, have their approvals withdrawn altogether.

The unsigned and undated MOIT document follows the Prime Minister’s surprise announcement dated 22 November that FiT 2 will only be available for projects with signed PPAs that are “under construction” and provided they reach COD by end of 2020.  The MOIT document seeks to define what “under construction” means for this purpose.  It takes a narrow view, referring to Article 6.1.b of Decree 59/2015/ND-CP dated 18 June 2015 re management of construction projects to suggest that for a project to be considered “under construction” the project must have completed appraisal of detailed / technical construction designs prior to 22 November 2019.

According to the MOIT’s data contained in the draft, it appears that only four out of 23 projects having already-signed PPAs but not yet reached COD would meet this criteria (some sources indicate there may be in excess of 30 such projects).  That would leave the vast majority of projects with signed PPAs out of contention for FiT2 and left scratching their heads as to what happens next.

As noted, the draft letter sighted is unofficial and draft only at this time so it is not yet definitive.  From our point of view, the MOIT is offering a far too narrow interpretation of what “under construction” could/ should mean.  Article 6.1.b of Decree 59 provides for numerous additional steps in the construction process that, if considered, would broaden the net substantially.  For example, it also refers to land allocation or lease; site investigation works, demining (if any); construction survey work; formulation, appraisal and approval of design and construction estimates; issuance of construction permits (if required); selection of contractors and signing of construction contracts, among other points.  There are approved projects that have paid for land clearance and compensation and started some site preparatory works but have held off completing detailed construction design appraisal pending the next FiT policy news.

As ever, it remains to be seen what final decision the PM will make on this issue.  It is not unreasonable to believe that the PM may consider the MOIT’s suggestion to be too narrow considering the substantial resources already committed by developers on many of these projects, some of which signed PPAs late 2017/ early 2018 expecting to make the FiT 1 cut off of 30 June 2019 and that have been left in limbo over the past nearly 6 months while the PM mulls the country’s new solar policy.

Watch this space.

For more information about Vietnam’s energy sector, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com or any of the lawyers in our office listing. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.

BREAKING NEWS – Vietnam’s PM decides to do away with solar FiTs in favor of auctions

Get ready for auctions!  After months of confusion and uncertainty over the policy for solar power development in Vietnam Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc today issued his conclusions and looks to have signed the death knell for solar feed in tariffs (FiT) in favor of competitive auctions.

In Notification No. 402/TB-VPCP dated 22 November 2019, the Prime Minster concluded that rational future development of the sector necessitates introducing an auction system for ground-mounted solar projects.  FiTs will continue to apply only for rooftop solar projects and certain already-approved ground-mounted projects.

The decision comes nearly five full months after expiry of the blanket 9.35c/ kWh FiT issued in April 2017 that kicked off a huge, and largely uncontrolled, rush that culminated in some 4,500MW of solar generation capacity becoming operational by July 2019 and, reportedly, an incredible 35GW of registered interest.  The first number alone is some 500% more than the 850MW of solar that was planned to be operational by 2020 in National Power Development Masterplan 7 (revised as of 2016).  That both highlights just how frenetic the activity was and also how efficiently the private sector is able to get these projects developed, financed and constructed.  Just imagine what could be done with an international-standard PPA and a developed grid infrastructure.

The Prime Minister, in his conclusions, chides the MOIT for the helter skelter development over the past two years, with many projects concentrated in areas where grid infrastructure is unable to properly serve the facilities resulting in widespread curtailment problems.  The Prime Minister has urged the MOIT to learn its lessons and re-orient itself towards a new reality.  The gold rush days are over and developers can expect a more rigorous licensing and approval process for new projects now.

FiTs aren’t entirely dead yet though.  The Prime Minister’s conclusions suggest, without stating definitively, that certain projects will still be entitled to FiTs.  Specifically, ground-mounted projects that already have signed PPAs and can be put into operation in 2020 appear set to continue to enjoy FiTs.  Rooftop solar projects will also continue to enjoy FiTs.  The Prime Minister has instructed the MOIT to propose the final FiT terms, including a list of projects entitled to enjoy the new FiT, and present them for his approval by 15 December 2019.  While the number is still unknown, it is widely expected to be 7.09c for ground-mounted projects and stay at 9.35c for rooftop projects (which are favored due to not needing land to be allocated).

Certain, already announced, special rules for Ninh Thuan province will continue to apply with some adjustment.  Specifically, some already-approved projects in that province will continue to enjoy the 9.35c FiT but only until total operational capacity there reaches 2000 MW or until the end of 2020, whichever comes first.  The race is on there.

For all other ground-mounted solar projects, the Prime Minister has determined that competitive auctions are the way forward.  No doubt having an eye on the September 2019 auctions in Cambodia that resulted in solar tariffs as low as 3.87c, and record low prices in other markets around the world, this is seen as the appropriate way to marry investor appetite with actual conditions.  There is of course a huge question mark over how such auctions will function in practice and there remains a lot to be seen.  Most significantly, will there be any changes to the standard PPA terms to facilitate low prices.  If not, the market will have to put a firm price on the bankability and contractual risk.

For more information about Vietnam’s energy sector, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com or any of the lawyers in our office listing. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.

The beat goes on: Vietnam’s new solar tariff documents add to the uncertainty

A flurry of recent official communications on the new solar FiT regime have only added to uncertainty about the income stream for solar projects in Vietnam after June 2019.

Following nearly two months of relative silence last draft proposed new FiTs were made public (read about them: here and here), the PM and MOIT have exchanged letters indicating that policy and decision makers are still some distance apart on a final position.

In a letter to the MOIT last week, the PM proposed that the provinces be divided into two regions with different tariffs, half the number of regions proposed by the MOIT recently,  and meaning lower overall tariffs for Northern provinces which have barely seen any solar project action since the sun rush kicked off a couple of years ago.

The MOIT responded by urging the PM to further consider the 4 region options it previously tabled in April and May.

On the other hand, the PM’s letter indicates some sympathy for projects struggling to meet the current 30 June 2019 COD deadline, intimating that they ought to be allowed to continue to enjoy the current 9.35c tariff  if their efforts to meet the COD deadline have been hamstrung by matters outside their control (e.g. – land clearance).  The MOIT response takes a  harder line on this, giving its view that the 30 June 2019 deadline should remain a bright line with no exceptions (outside of those Ninh Thuan projects already granted an extension last year).

With the MOIT now seeking further opinions from EVN, the MOF and MOJ, one imagines it is could be risky to assume that the new FiT rates will be officially promulgated prior to the existing ones expiring on 30 June.

The two regions and corresponding FiTs for different kinds of solar projects as proposed by the PM are:

Region I (all Provinces except Region II Provinces)

Floating solar power = VND1,758/ kwh = 7.69 US cents / kwh
Ground mounted solar power = VND1,620/ kwh = 7.09 US cents / kwh
Roof solar power = VND1,916/ kwh = 8.38 US cents / kwh

Region II (Phú Yên, Gia Lai, Đăk Lăk, Khánh Hòa, Ninh Thuận and Bình Thuận Provinces)

Floating solar power = VND1,655/ kwh = 7.24 US cents / kwh
Ground mounted solar power = VND1,525/ kwh = 6.67 US cents / kwh
Roof solar power = VND1,803/ kwh = 7.89 US cents / kwh

Be aware: these are far from final.  Watch this space.

For more information about Vietnam’s energy sector, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com or any of the lawyers in our office listing. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.

Vietnam’s draft new solar tariffs – more sun, less cents, more sense

A new proposed tariff structure for solar energy projects in Vietnam sets out different rates for different irradiation regions and gives long-awaited indication of direction for the market after 30 June 2019.  On 29 January 2019, the Ministry of Industry and Trade (“MOIT“) released parts of a draft decision to update the country’s current feed in tariff (FiT) structure which is only valid until 30 June 2019 (the “Draft”).

The Draft is of course still just that, a draft, but forecasts a clear change in strategy with respect to FiTs.

Under the current FiT policy (regulated by Decision 11 and Decision 16) there is only one FiT for all projects regardless of location.  That is an internationally respectable FiT of 9.35 US cents per kWh for all on-grid solar power projects that achieve commercial operation date (“COD”) prior to 30 June 2019 (with the exception of some projects in Ninh Thuan province which have a later COD timeline).

The Draft however sets out a wide range of differing FiTs that vary based on: (i) when COD happens, (ii) location (3 regions are identified based on solar irradiation data), and (iii) the type of solar projects (i.e., floating, ground-mounted, integrated storage system or rooftop solar).

The table below shows what the Draft contemplates:

Projects with COD from 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020

 

Solar power types Region 1 (see regions below)

(28 northern provinces with annual solar irradiation of up to 1,432.8 kWh/m2/year)

Region 2

(6 central provinces of Vietnam with annual solar irradiation of up to 1,676.1 kWh/m2/year)

Region3

(29 central highlands and southern provinces of Vietnam with annual solar irradiation of up to 1,910.3 kWh/m2/year)

VND / kWh US cent equivalent VND / kWh US cent equivalent VND / kWh US cent equivalent
Floating solar power projects 2,135 9.35 1,838 8.05 1,612 7.06
Ground-mounted solar power projects 2,095 9.18 1,802 7.89 1,583 6.94
Solar power projects with integrated storage system N/A N/A N/A N/A 2,052 8.99
Rooftop solar power projects 2,448 9.85 1,933 8.47 1,697 7.43
Projects with COD from 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021

 

Floating solar power projects 2,028 8.88 1,746 7.65 1,531 6.71
Ground-mounted solar power projects 1,990 8.72 1,712 7.50 1,504 6.59
Solar power projects with integrated storage system N/A N/A N/A N/A 1,949 8.54
Rooftop solar power projects 2,023 8.86 1,740 7.62 1,527 6.69

 

While no changes will please everyone, especially the many developers who have committed considerable resources based on assumptions of the current FiT rate, the changes still indicate strong support for solar power projects generally and a rational approach to reflect the markedly different irradiation levels across the country.  Such an approach should take some pressure of heavily-stretched Southern hotspots (stretched from both power infrastructure and bureaucratic bottleneck perspectives).

We will continue to monitor this and update further as possible.  Meanwhile, we’d be delighted to hear views from developers and financiers about the change of strategic policy direction and FiTs forecast by the Draft.  Get in touch and tell us what you think.

Region 1: comprising 28 northern provinces of Vietnam with annual solar irradiation of 1,225.6 – 1,432.8 kWh/m2/year or daily solar irradiation of 3.36 – 3.92 kWh/m2/day. Including: Ha Giang, Bac Kan, Cao Bang, Tuyen Quang, Thai Nguyen, Lao Cai, Yen Bai, Lang Son, Quang Ninh, Phu Tho, Vinh Phuc, Bac Giang, Hai Duong, Hoa Binh, Hanoi, Ha Nam, Bac Ninh, Hung Yen, Hai Phong, Ninh Binh, Thai Binh, Ha Tinh, Nam Dinh, Quang Binh, Thanh Hoa, Lai Chau, Nghe An and Son La.

Region 2: comprising 6 central provinces of Vietnam with annual solar irradiation of 1,456 – 1,676.1 kWh/m2/year or daily solar irradiation of 3.99 – 4.59 kWh/m2/day. Including: Quang Tri, Dien Bien, Thua Thien Hue, Quang Nam, Da Nang and Quang Ngai.

Region 3: comprising 29 central highlands and southern provinces of Vietnam with annual solar irradiation of 1,703.9 – 1,910.3 kWh/m2/year or daily solar irradiation of 4.67 – 5.23 kWh/m2/day. Including: Kon Tum, Ca Mau, Hau Giang, Binh Dinh, Phu Yen, Bac Lieu, Kien Giang, Soc Trang, Gia Lai, Can Tho, Vinh Long, Tra Vinh, Dak Lak, Khanh Hoa, Lam Dong, Ben Tre, Tien Giang, An Giang, Dak Nong, Ho Chi Minh City, Dong Nai, Dong Thap, Ba Ria – Vung Tau, Long An, Binh Duong, Binh Phuoc, Tay Ninh, Ninh Thuan and Binh Thuan.

For more information about Vietnam’s solar and renewable energy sectors, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com, Tran Thanh at MTTran@duanemorris.com or any of the lawyers in our office listing.  Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.

Solar project COD extension for Ninh Thuan province finally confirmed

Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc signed Resolution 115/NQ-CP on 31 August 2018 to confirm some special policies to support Ninh Thuan province (“Resolution 115”). Pursuant to Article 1.1.e of the Resolution 115, the Prime Minister  confirmed that the commercial operation date (COD) deadline (previously 30 June 2019) for solar projects in Ninh Thuan province to enjoy the 9.35 US cents feed in tariff has been extended to the end of 2020.  This extension applies to those solar energy projects approved in the relevant Master Plan (approx. 2000MW).  Resolution 115 took effect on 31 August 2018 and lays to rest the badly kept secret that Ninh Thuan, a literal hot spot for solar projects, will enjoy more favorable terms than projects in other locations which remain bound to the 30 June 2019 COD deadline.   Clear and definitive statements as to what will happen after 30 June 2019 for projects in other locations is now desperately required.  Our view and intel is that no-one else should bank on extensions and should develop strategies now to mitigate risks of missing the 30 June 2019 date (e.g. – look to be an early mover in the hotly-anticipated DPPA (direct power purchase) market).

For more information about renewable energy projects in Vietnam, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com or any of the lawyers in our office listing. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.

新規PPP関連法が立てうる、ベトナムのインフラ開発への道筋

著者:Giles T. Cooper

翻訳:志澤政彦(Masahiko Shizawa)

原文:https://blogs.duanemorris.com/vietnam/2018/06/19/will-a-new-ppp-law-pave-the-way-for-vietnams-infrastructure/

インフラというボトルネックに、ベトナムの急成長が直面している。政府には、今まさに必要な道路、鉄道、トンネルに資金を投下できるほどの予算がない。そこで専門家が目を向け始めているのは、民間セクターである。

この制約がある以上、非国家セクターの資金を輸送インフラ開発のため継続的に活用することが今すぐ必要となる。アジア開発銀行(ADB)によれば、2015年から2020年までの間のインフラへの投資のため、ベトナムは最大170億米ドルを必要とするだろうとのことである。

近年、ベトナム政府は官民連携(PPP)プログラムの下で投資プロジェクトに透明性を与えるよう進めてきた。PPPは、政府機関と民間投資家が協同してなす投資の一形態であり、インフラの建設、修復、運営、並びに管理、及び公共サービスの提供のために行われる。政府はPPPにより、開発目標達成のため民間セクターの効率性と専門性を活用することができる。

そうはいっても、そうしたプロジェクトの持続的な実施を阻む欠点や限界があり、現状で名乗りを上げるのに投資家は慎重を期している。

投資を勧奨する政令が提出されてきてはいる。しかし、その条件は魅力的とはいえず、そのようなプロジェクトに必要な柔軟性がないとの批判もある。PPP投資活動の主な規制は以前、PPP投資に関する政令15/2015/ND-CP号及び入札法の実施指針である政令30/2015/ND-CP号であった。

この国は、1990年から2016年までに総額162憶米ドルにも及ぶ84件のPPPプロジェクトを実施してきている。うち79%はエネルギー関連のものであった。 一方、2011年のPPPパイロットプログラムが制定されて以来、この法的枠組みを利用した新規PPPプロジェクトは一切登録されていない。

政府は最近、政令15/2015を改正し、ベトナムにおけるPPPプロジェクトの分野、投資条件、手続を特定した政令63/2018(政令63)を発行した。この新たな政令により、PPPプロジェクトにおける投資家の資本比率が20%にまで引き上げられる。政令63は2018年の6月に施行された。

これで十分といえるか

BOT(Build-Operate-Transfer)方式とBT(Build-Transfer)方式のプロジェクトに対する調査・監査結果によれば、そのほとんどにおいて、投資家選定の際の入札が限定され、低い競争性と透明性の欠如を招いたとのことである。また、プロジェクトの通知は未だにオープンな方法で実施されていない。

同時に、プロジェクト実施の管理は非効率的であり、建設作業の低質化等の様々な問題を引き起こしている。

これらの問題に対応して投資を促進するため、ベトナム国会は政府に、上記のような難点や法的制限を取り払うようなPPP関連法を作るよう求めた。

PPP関連法の成功に必要な3要素

  • 明確なリスク共有メカニズム

当局は未だ、政府がデベロッパーのため一定の最低収益を保証し、それに至らない場合に補填するようなリスク共有メカニズムを、明確に打ち出してきてはいない。この点は、プロジェクトがしばしば重大なリスクを伴うインフラの場合には特に重要である。規制の明確さにより投資家の信頼を得られるのではないだろうか。

現状のモデルでは、ほとんどのリスクを民間セクターに転嫁してしまっている。民間の投資家や事業者の誘致には、透明性のある政策枠組みと公平なリスク分配が鍵である。同様に、明確に定義されたプロジェクトの射程と期待できる金銭的な利益の適切な保証を伴った魅力的な取引のストラクチャーによって、PPPへの参加が奨励されるものと思われる。

  • 為替レート保証

長期的な融資は外貨によってなされるものの、ベトナムのインフラプロジェクトの収益は現地通貨ベトナムドンによる。これだと、プロジェクトの収益性に負の影響をもたらす。新たなPPP関連法を成功に導くには、長期的な建設プロジェクトの中で投資家が同等の交換レートを確保できるよう、政府による兌換保証メカニズムを盛り込む改善が必要となろう。

海外への外貨送金の制限も縮小される必要があろう。

こうした障害や通貨変動のリスクは、投資家の信頼に大きな影響を与える。これらを取り除くことが、この国の継続的前進に必要な種類のプロジェクト誘致に重要であろう。

  • 金銭的インセンティブ

典型的な長期投資であるインフラプロジェクトには、投資家に巨大な建築に必要な20年から30年もの間の関与をさせるため、対価としての追加のインセンティブや収益の保証が必要となろう。

このリスクを相殺するために、政府は開発の波及的効果の一部を投資家に報いることを考えてもよいだろう。インセンティブがあれば、収益が交通の流れや将来の予測不可能な状況に依存するといった、インフラ開発に内在的な不確実性を減らすことができるだろう。

要するに、やる気のある投資家の誘致にベトナムが必要なのは、信頼できる政策及び規制、加えて投資家の信頼を得られるようなPPPに特化した政府部門といった、透明性、公平性、予測可能性を確保できる枠組みである。

ライフサイクルコスト、安全性、レジリエンス(強靭性)、そして環境への影響といったその他の要素も、考慮される必要がある。

ベトナムのインフラ開発への需要は揺るぐまい。しかし、現状の立法状況が実現可能または収益性のあるPPPプロジェクトに繋がるとはいえない。PPP関連法の上述のような点をクリアにすれば、透明性を向上し、この国に目を向けている事業体のリスクを減らし、もって状況の改善が見込めるだろう。

ベトナム投資に関する情報については、GTCooper@duanemorris.comよりGiles弁護士または当事務所の弁護士一覧の弁護士にお問い合わせください。Giles はドウェイン・モリス・ベトナム法律事務所の共同代表であり、ドウェイン・モリス・ホーチミン支所の支所代表です。

ベトナム:インフラ開発のジレンマにグリーンボンドは効くか著者:Giles T. Cooper

翻訳:志澤政彦(Masahiko Shizawa)

原文:https://blogs.duanemorris.com/vietnam/2018/05/15/are-green-bonds-the-answer-to-vietnams-infrastructure-dilemma/ 

ベトナムを含む東南アジア諸国では、急成長とともに安定した資金源の確保が困難になってきた。

このことは、インフラ事業において顕著である。アジア開発銀行(ADB)の報告書によると、経済成長に伴い、2030年までにこの地域では2.8兆米ドルに相当する道路、橋梁、鉄道が必要になるとされている。

不安定さを増す政治情勢に直面している東南アジア諸国は、この先数年のインフラ開発の資金調達の選択肢としてより安全なものに目を向けている。「一帯一路」政策の下ですでに1兆米ドルものプロジェクトを支援してきた中国への過剰依存は、国内的解決策を経済が志向するにつれ、その規模が縮小されていくものであろう。従前に表明した境界線を踏み越えようとする中国の計画への恐怖は、資金の不正流用及び失敗したプロジェクトという具体的教訓と相まって、この地域周辺の国々に「一帯一路」の活用の再考を迫ってきた。

南シナ海の領域問題をめぐる政治的緊張及び増加傾向にある国際的な保護主義を前に、ベトナムのような国々は将来的な資金調達を自前で行う途を探る方向でいる。この地域全般で国家予算への負担は増加傾向にあり、この先数年で強く求められる成長のため投下すべき他の資金元を探そうとしている。一つの提案は、「グリーンボンド」の発行促進である。

「グリーンボンド」について知らなければならないこと

グリーンボンドは債券の一つであるが、発行者によって調達された資金は「グリーン」なプロジェクト、つまり、環境に配慮し、気候への懸念を考慮に入れたものに割り当てられる。グリーンボンドの発行が特に利益になるセクターは、再生可能エネルギー、インフラ、および建設業界である。

道路、橋梁、トンネル、そして鉄道の建設には、地域的及び全国的な気候に多大な負担をかけてしまう。そのため、環境フットプリントの低減を志向するプロジェクトの優先度は最も高い。

環境に配慮したプロジェクトに資金調達を集中させることに加えて、グリーンボンドは発行者の持続可能な開発への取り組みの深さを強調する意義もある。さらに、発行者はグリーン・ベンチャーにのみ投資をする特定のグループのグローバル投資家にアクセスできるようになる。国外のプレーヤーによるグリーンな投資への注目が高まっている中、資本調達のコスト削減にも貢献しうる。

ベトナムにとって意味するものとは

ドイツの開発機構であるGIZによれば、現在の炭素依存的成長からより持続可能な道筋へと移行し、その約束草案(Intended Nationally Determined Contribution、INC)に向けた行動をとるため、ベトナムは2020年までにおよそ307億米ドルを必要としている。

グリーンな成長のための資金のうち30%程度は国家予算、すなわち中央と各省の予算及び政府開発援助、からの拠出が見込まれているが、残りは民間セクターから供給されることとなるとみられる。

ベトナム政府が2011年から2020年の期間について承認したベトナム・グリーン成長戦略(Vietnam Green Growth Strategy, VGGS)の下では、資本市場がその目標達成のカギとなるだろう。グリーンボンドが死活的な役割を果たすのは、まさにこの点においてである。グリーンなプロジェクトや事業体のため特別に資金調達を行い、グリーンな商品のデリバティブの流通の素地を作り、さらに民間セクターの投資を持続可能な開発のため活用することになる。

国外からの関心としては、ベトナムのグリーンボンドの発行により、持続可能な開発、再生可能エネルギー、そして環境に配慮した成長を志向している国際投資家の誘致が期待されている。世界中の投資家が、気候変動の課題やエネルギーの移行につき、前にも増して注視している。環境問題を考慮に入れた投資ツール、特に開発途上国におけるものについて要求する投資家は、増加の一途を辿っている。

この地域で、ベトナムが持続可能な資金調達の見通しを見据えている唯一の国というわけではない。アセアン・グリーンボンド基準(ASEAN Green Bonds Standards、AGBS)が2017年11月に開発・実行され、アセアンでのグリーンボンドの発行に共通の基準が制定された。マレーシア、シンガポール、インドネシアの会社は、すでにアセアン・グリーンボンドと称された債券を発行している。

これらのグリーンボンドの発行によって調達された資金は、再生可能エネルギー、廃棄物処理、グリーンな建築物やインフラといった、持続可能性の要件を満たしたプロジェクトに配分され、さらに統合、連帯、アセアン全体の成長といった共通の目標に貢献するものである。何よりも、地域のリーダーたちは将来世代の犠牲のもとに成長は成り立たないことに気づいてきている。AGBSのような新たな取り組みが、環境に配慮した投資への資源の分配を促進するだろう。

成長不全を来しているグリーンな成長

2020年までに達成されるべき指標の一つは、グリーンボンド市場を、現在およそ90兆米ドルのグローバル債券市場の少なくとも1%にまで拡大することである。これを現実のものとするため、ソブリン債発行者は断固たる決断をする必要がある。

流動性の欠如、債券の構造の限定的な多様性、及び確実に収益の見込めるプロジェクトの定期的で大きな流れの不在といったものが、未だにアジアの現地通貨によるグリーンボンド市場の特徴である。

加えて、社会的責任を果たそうとしている投資家からの恒常的な要求はまだ限定的であり、この市場の成長の可能性を阻んでいる。

そうはいっても、ソブリン債発行者が環境を整備し、強力な枠組みが適用される限り、現地通貨でのグリーンボンド市場の成長の見込みは大きい。制約となりうるのは、確実に収益の見込めるグリーンな投資の数と大きさであろう。

もしベトナムが「グリーンボンド」の動きを十全に活用しようとするなら、上述したような方法での資金の注入が解決策を示してくれるだろう。それは、インフラ事業における資金調達の穴を埋め、より速い拡張に向けた基礎を固め、そして、これまで長い間痛めつけてきた環境には休息をもたらすものであるはずだ。

ベトナムのグリーンボンドに関する情報については、GTCooper@duanemorris.comよりGiles弁護士または当事務所の弁護士一覧の弁護士にお問い合わせください。Giles はドウェイン・モリス・ベトナム法律事務所の共同代表であり、ドウェイン・モリス・ホーチミン支所の支所代表です。

What’s next for green energy in Vietnam – 4 steps to the future

Now that the United States has retreated from the Paris Climate Accords, and relinquished its leadership role in the fight against climate change, it remains to be seen whether smaller nations will stick to their pledges of greenhouse gas reduction.

Eyes are on countries like Vietnam to see if they keep to their commitments or revert to the pursuit of cheap and dirty coal-powered solutions for their energy needs.

Vietnam, in particular, faces some of the biggest risks. Global warming is a major threat to the country, where rising sea levels are predicted to swallow up nearly half of the Mekong Delta, a crucial area for domestic food production, in coming decades.

Currently, coal-fired plants in Vietnam contribute to thousands of premature deaths and air quality in big cities is getting worse. In 2017, the capital Hanoi enjoyed just 38 days of clean air, with contaminant levels four times those deemed acceptable by the World Health Organization.

Business as usual?

Unlike Obama, the Trump administration seems unlikely to apply any real pressure on other countries to pursue clean energy or combat climate change, and so it will be up to domestic forces to really push for change.

According to the government’s current national plan, electricity generated from coal will rise five-fold between now and 2030, and GHG emissions will increase in lockstep. This is at odds with Vietnam’s pledge to the Paris Climate Accord, which targets 8 percent emissions reduction by 2030, and could rise as high as a 25 percent reduction with international support, such as financing for solar panels and wind turbines.

Energy and environment experts worry that the country’s next national power development plan, which is under revision this year, could hold to those figures or, worse, embrace a more aggressive coal strategy.

The story, however, is not all doom and gloom. Vietnam does have the potential to become a regional clean energy leader, if only the country’s energy development and investment environment can be reshaped. Business involvement in this process will be crucial, as the commercial and industrial sectors consume more than 60 percent of Vietnam’s electricity.

Khanh Nguy Thi, founder of the Vietnamese nonprofit Green Innovation and Development Centre, recently won the 2018 Goldman Environmental Prize for her work convincing state agencies to increase their use of renewable energy. Her efforts were instrumental in halting the construction of two hydropower plants in a national park and securing a 20,000 MW reduction in planned coal expansion.

Government leaders have also demonstrated a desire to utilise Vietnam’s abundant sunlight and over 2,026 miles of coastline in the pursuit of renewable energy.

4 solutions for a sustainable energy sector

Clearly, clean energy opportunities are available, the question is how to encourage more investment. Obstacles persist with the regulatory environment, preventing the country from tapping its potential in this area. Here are four small changes which could bridge the gap between policy and implementation, ensuring the green energy dream becomes a reality:

  1. Streamline regulations regarding Power Purchase Agreements (PPA) and support the use of Direct Power Purchase Agreements (DPPA).

Negotiating standard PPAs with EVN, the sole power purchaser, is time-consuming, which cause rising total project costs. The streamlining of such deals would render them more attractive to power producers and cut lengthy approval time, which often leads to execution delays or complete abandonment of projects.

USAID and Vietnam’s Ministry of Industry and Trade are working together to enable private sector electricity buyers and renewable energy providers to enter into DPPA. This would allow industrial energy buyers to purchase electricity directly from independent renewable energy producers.

Such a mechanism would help companies enjoy constant power prices and ultimately save power costs. By signing a long-term DPPA to buy power from a clean energy generator, businesses can have a constant power price, reducing risk and helping firms establish long-term business plans with no surprises down the road.

  1. Improve the transparency of electricity rate forecasting.

Electricity prices will have to increase in order for Vietnam’s national utility to finance new energy projects, but the schedule for such increases remains vague. Better transparency of expected price increases will allow buyers and investors to more accurately value fixed-cost renewable energy contracts, which can offer some price protection.

Additionally, improving the quality and sourcing of data on renewable energy can help clarify for investors available locations, infrastructure capabilities and government targets, as well as other information to help reduce risk on investment decisions.

  1. Encourage supporting industries.

Supporting industries plays a crucial role in the development and adoption of renewable energy technologies. The government should promote domestic SMEs through capital subsidy and incentives such as tax breaks and preferential loans. A competitive supporting industry will help in reducing the tariff and investment costs for renewable projects, nurturing their development as part of Vietnam’s energy sector.

  1. Develop a renewable energy model for industrial parks.

Given the expectation that industrial areas will continue to play a big role in Vietnamese manufacturing and commerce, these parks are an important place to explore renewable solutions. Aggregating demand from tenants in the parks would help scale clean energy and make it more affordable for all.

Green power pioneer

Renewable energy has the capacity to power Vietnam and with the right policies in place, the country can deliver affordable, safe and clean power for continued economic growth.

Vietnamese businesses and the government could chart an unprecedented course for clean energy, and represent a role model for Southeast Asia — if they can address some key barriers. The changes detailed above would help drive the country’s energy transition toward a sustainable, greener future, and demonstrate that the fight against climate change can continue without American leadership.

For more information about Vietnam’s renewable energy sector, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com or any of the lawyers in our office listing. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.