Arizona Lawmakers Pass Sports Betting and Gaming Expansion Bill  

Arizona legislative leaders passed Arizona’s sports betting bill late Monday which sets the state for the legalization of land-based and state-wide online sports betting. Following the Arizona House of Representatives’ approval last month, the Arizona Senate approved Senate Bill 1797 with a 23-6 vote.  Arizona Governor Doug Ducey has indicated he will sign the bill once it reaches his desk for signature.

In summary, the bill legalizes sports betting, daily fantasy sports, retail and online keno, and mobile lottery draw games.  In regards to sports betting, the bill allows for 20 total licenses to be awarded for online sports betting.   The twenty licenses are designated as “event wagering licenses” which includes ten licenses designated for Indian tribes and ten licenses designated for professional sports franchises and facilities. Currently, Arizona is home to six professional sports franchises and facilities, including the Arizona Cardinals, Arizona Coyotes, Arizona Diamondbacks, Phoenix Suns, Phoenix Raceway and TPC Scottsdale, a PGA Tour affiliate.  Each event wagering operator may partner with a sportsbooks “designee” to operate its state-wide mobile sports wagering on the licensee’s behalf.

The event wagering licensee is also permitted to operate a land-based sportsbook in their stadium, or nearby retail locations that are within five miles of their designated facility, called a “limited event wagering license.”  The Arizona Department of Gaming is permitted to issue ten total limited event wagering licenses to authorize wagering at the ten specific retail locations.   Accordingly, the bill also permits an event wagering operator to partner with a racetrack enclosure that holds a permit issued by the Division of Racing to obtain one of the ten “limited event wagering license”.  The limited event wagering license only permits retail sports betting, and not online sports betting.

All licensed sportsbook are required to use official league data to settle “in-play” or “live” wagers.  Most significantly, the professional sports leagues are expressly permitted to share in the handle from the sports betting operators without requiring any gaming license or regulatory approval.

In addition to sports betting, Senate Bill 1797 permits fantasy sports operators to finally enter the Arizona market.  All fantasy sports operators must be licensed with the Department of Gaming.  Indian tribes that conduct Class III Gaming pursuant to the tribal-state gaming company may offer fantasy sports contests as well, either directly or through a third-party operator.

Key Components

  • Twenty total event wagering licenses are available
    • Ten licenses for Arizona professional sports franchise and facilities
    • Ten licenses for Indian tribes
  • Ten licenses for limited event wagering, for retail sports betting including racetracks and specific retail locations
  • The Department of Gaming will establish application fees and renewal fees for all licenses
  • Licensees are required to use official league data for live in-game wagers
  • Professional sports leagues are permitted to share in the handle from licensees without having to go through a separate licensing process
  • Fantasy sports contests are now legalized

Amendments to Arizona Tribal Gaming Compact

Governor Ducey plans to sign this bill to help facilitate amendments to the tribal gaming compact between Arizona and the 23 federally-recognized gaming tribes.  Following the signing of this bill, Governor Duce is expected to sign amendments to the state-tribal gaming compacts to allow tribes to expand casinos and offer additional table games such as baccarat, craps, and roulette.  The amendments also permit the Tribes to expand casinos to an unspecified number of new casinos in Phoenix.

FinCEN Director Addresses Gaming Industry

On August 13, Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) Director Kenneth Blanco addressed the 12th Annual Las Vegas Anti-Money Laundering Conference and provided insights on his agency’s expectations for the ever-evolving gaming industry.

The following are some key takeaways:

Cost Cutting Poses National Security Threat. Director Blanco stressed that reports of compliance budget cuts by casinos looking to trim costs and retain gamblers is seen by FinCEN as a national security issue and not something the agency takes lightly. Further, despite FinCEN not publicizing any enforcement actions against a casino during the last year, it is continually looking at compliance across all financial institutions and will not hesitate to act if it identifies violations of the Bank Secrecy Act (“BSA”). It is also important to note that not all enforcement actions are public—FinCEN often closes cases with warning letters sent to financial institutions or refers cases to our delegated examiners for additional review.

Casino Industry Trends. In terms of suspicious activity being reported in 2019, Minimal Gaming with Large Transactions is the highest reported activity with more than 5,000 Suspicious Activity Reports (“SAR”) reflecting this activity. Reports of Chip Walking have dramatically increased since this was added to the SAR form in the summer of 2018. Chip Walking is now the second most selected suspicious activity on the SAR form, with more than 4,400 reports being cited this year to date.

The other frequently cited suspicious activities include:

  • Transactions below CTR Threshold
  • Unknown Source of Chips
  • Two or More Individuals Working Together
  • Alteration or Cancelation of Transactions to Avoid CTR Requirement
  • Suspicion Concerns on the Source of Funds

Additional analysis of trends reported by casinos checking the “other” box on the SAR form includes reports of suspicious activity involving sports betting, abandoned jackpot, and bill stuffing.

Sports Betting and Mobile Gaming. Casinos and card clubs must integrate sports betting and mobile gaming products into their existing AML programs. FinCEN expects casinos and card clubs to collect cyber-related indicators through their mobile gaming or betting applications in order to monitor and report potentially suspicious activity. Examples of such cyber-indicators include: source and destination information, file information, subject user names, system modifications, and account information.

Relevance of Convertible Virtual Currency (CVC) Advisory to Casinos. There are generally two areas where CVC will intersect with casinos and card clubs: so-called CVC casinos on the internet, and physical casinos and card clubs that accept CVC for gaming.

As FinCEN’s CVC guidance points out, internet gaming sites that operate online without licensure from a state or tribal gaming regulator are not “casinos” for purposes of regulations implementing the BSA. However, they are likely operating as money transmitters. Money transmitters have their own obligations under the BSA and its implementing regulations, which includes a formal registration with FinCEN.

Casinos and card clubs that accept CVC from customers either on location or through mobile applications, need to ensure that CVCs are accounted for in policies, procedures, internal controls and risk assessments. This includes developing processes for reviewing and conducting due diligence on transactions in CVC, for conducting blockchain analytics to determine the source of the CVC, and incorporating CVC-related indicators into SAR filings.

Culture of Compliance. Critical to fostering a culture of compliance is utilizing enterprise-wide information and ensuring such information gets into the hands of compliance personnel. For example, information developed by casinos for business and marketing, as wells as information developed by casino security departments for combating and preventing fraud should be used by casino compliance personnel to monitor customers for suspicious activity. Similarly, a casino’s legal department should alert compliance personnel when a subpoena is received as it could trigger reviews of customer risk ratings and account activity. Moreover, larger casinos may have multiple affiliated casinos that could benefit from the sharing of information across the organization.

Innovation and BSA Value. In January 2019, FinCEN began an ambitious project to catalogue the value of BSA reporting across the entire value chain of its creation and use. The project will result in a comprehensive and quantitative understanding of the broad value of BSA reporting and other BSA information to all types of consumers of that information.

As an example, given the current state of the opioid epidemic, something a minor as the mobile phone number of a suspect from a casino SAR could be vitally important to a DEA agent since the suspect would provide a real phone number to ensure he is called when his winnings are wired out to a bank account. Using that mobile number, the agent can build out a communication tree and identify new individuals, entities, addresses or accounts. A DEA agent can also use this information to seek legal approval to wiretap or track the movement of the phone, identify potential informants, and build out a network of associates.

Preparing Your Casino For Iran Sanctions Compliance

As a result of the previously reported reimposition of United States nuclear-related sanctions against Iran, on October 11, 2018, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) released an Advisory that provides casinos, and other financial institutions, updated guidance for identifying possible Iranian related criminal transactions.

Continue reading “Preparing Your Casino For Iran Sanctions Compliance”

New Jersey Legislature Takes First Step To Authorize North Jersey Casinos

A Proposed Amendment to the New Jersey State Constitution will authorize two additional casinos in the State. The details of the Proposed Amendment are as follows:

  • No more than 2 casinos, each one to be located in different counties in State
  • New casinos must be located  outside a 75 mile radius from Atlantic City.
  • Eligibility for the license is limited to:
    • (1) a currently licensed Atlantic City casino operating as of December 11, 2015; or
    • or (2 ) any person licensed as a principal owner (yet undefined) of a holder of a New Jersey casino license that was operating a casino which was conducting gambling on December 11, 2015 if that principal owner also holds a valid license to own and operate a casino in another jurisdiction with licensing standards similar to those in New Jersey
  • Tax rate to be determined in subsequent legislation. 49% of such tax revenue for 15 years is dedicated for recovery , stabilization or improvement of Atlantic City.  2% of tax revenue dedicated to thoroughbred and standardbred  horsemen.
  • The Resolution has to be approved with 3/5 votes by both houses of the NJ Legislature or majority votes twice over two years. The votes have to be completed at least 90 days before going on the ballot of a state-wide referendum to amend the NJ State Constitution.

A copy of the proposed amendment can be read here: SCR 185.

Duane Morris Receives Corporate LiveWire’s 2016 Excellence in Gaming New Jersey Law Firm Award

Duane Morris LLP has received the 2016 Corporate LiveWire Excellence in Gaming Law Firm Award for New Jersey. The gaming awards look at the gaming sector as a whole and cover casinos, online and mobile gaming, as well as championing firms involved in
gaming law and regulatory compliance.

“We’re honored to receive this award,” said Hersh Kozlov, head of the firm’s Gaming Law Practice Group and managing partner of the Cherry Hill office. “We strive to provide our gaming industry clients with top-notch service and it’s gratifying to be recognized for the work we do.”

The Corporate LiveWire Awards represent the pinnacle of business achievement, recognizing the best in their respective fields. The awards cover the most important sectors of business, from finance advisories and funding providers to law firms and specialist advisory companies that deal with mergers and acquisitions.

For the full story, please see the press release on the Duane Morris website.

Duane Morris Partner Christoper Soriano to Speak at the 6th Forum on US Online Gaming

Duane Morris partner Christopher Soriano will be a speaker at the 6th Forum on US Online Gaming to be held on May 12-14, 2015, at the DoubleTree Suites by Hilton in New York City. Mr. Soriano will be a speaker for the “Pre-Forum Master Class: Interstate Gaming: How Can Cross-Border Capability Improve Liquidity?” on May 12 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Pennsylvania Considering Video Gaming Machines Again?

On February 12, 2014, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives’ Gaming Oversight Committee held a hearing to receive testimony regarding the prospects of legalizing electronic gaming devices, i.e video gaming machines, in the Commonwealth. The hearing focused on gaming along the lines of what was raised in a prior session’s bill, (2014 House Bill No 1932), which sought to legalize video gaming machines for bingo, keno, blackjack and other games for use in establishments with valid liquor licenses, such as restaurants, bars, taverns, hotels and clubs.

With a looming budgetary deficit Pennsylvania legislators are exploring various ways to increase gaming related tax revenue, including potentially moving forward with internet gaming through its existing bricks and mortar casinos. This recent Gaming Oversight Committee hearing revisiting the video gaming machines issue would be another means through which to generate gaming based tax revenue. The hearing’s witnesses touted the jobs and tax revenues generated by Illinois which implemented video gaming machines in bars, restaurants, taverns and truck stops several years ago – (projected IL tax revenues in excess of $250 million in 2015). While Illinois has had success generating tax revenue and producing jobs with its video gaming machine roll out, the machines do compete, on a low end basis with the states’ existing casinos. While local municipalities in Illinois can opt out of the video gaming program that option may not exist in a Pennsylvania bill and opposition from Pennsylvania’s casino industry remains to be seen.

Also, if considering video gaming at bars and taverns Pennsylvania may be well served to learn from some of the mistakes made with the passage of last year’s Tavern games legislation. Tavern games, with its gaming regulatory scrutiny focused on the bars/tavern owners, rather than through the games’ owners and route operators, lead to cost issues and a reluctance to move forward which hampered widespread implementation of tavern gaming. In addition, while Illinois has had relative success with its multi-tiered system of manufacturers, distributors, operators and establishments, that system has one too many layers to operate as effectively as it otherwise could. Few recall Pennsylvania’s short-lived requirement of local suppliers of slot machines layered between the industry’s manufacturers and end user casinos. The removal of the local supplier requirement opened the way to the implementation of Pennsylvania casinos in 2006. Finally the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board and its agencies are more than capable of regulating and rolling out video gaming should it become law. Bringing in other, less experienced state agencies, such as Liquor Control or the Department of Revenue would only further complicate and delay implementation should the law pass.