Reaping the Awards – Avoiding the Pitfalls of Enforcing Arbitral Awards

By Charlyn Cruz

As with litigation, a successful arbitral award is a hollow victory if the responding party refuses to honour it, and enforcement proceedings are necessary. Given the international nature of arbitration, a number of things could go wrong at this stage and put a downer on a successful award. There are matters that ought to be considered strategically at the outset at contract stage and beyond to be ready to deal with a reluctant party after the award. It is therefore crucial to take certain steps at various stages to ensure you cross the finish line and reap those awards. Continue reading “Reaping the Awards – Avoiding the Pitfalls of Enforcing Arbitral Awards”

The Glass Ceiling Looms Large – Gender Diversity in Arbitration

In a previous blog, we looked at diversity, specifically in relation to gender parity, in the context of adjudication.[1] Although we have come a long way in this arena, the issue of gender diversity still casts a long shadow. It should therefore be no surprise that the world of arbitration suffers much of the same problem. Continue reading “The Glass Ceiling Looms Large – Gender Diversity in Arbitration”

Jurisdictional challenges and arbitration clauses – that old chestnut! – The UK perspective

By Oliver Kent

Picture this. You are a Director at a substantial widget manufacturing company. One of your key materials suppliers, with whom you’ve had a relationship for many years, is causing you grief. There have been a number of complaints from customers in recent times about a decline in widget quality, which appear to be the fault of your supplier. However, you’re behind on your payments to the supplier and they are starting to threaten supply, with disastrous effects for the company. A dispute is brewing.

You have been involved with litigation before and have experience of court proceedings. However, when you check with your legal team about next steps, you learn that your agreement with the supplier contains a clause which appears to indicate that all disputes must be referred to arbitration. The clause is perhaps not drafted with the certainty it should and could have been, and it is not clear the extent to which it is enforceable. The issue usually is framed on the basis of whether there is a valid and enforceable agreement to refer disputes to arbitration.

There are also commercial considerations that may be relevant. Is it preferable to litigate in the domestic courts or arbitrate? This may be a commercial call, just as much as a legal one. This blog shares some of the practical considerations around these issues.
Continue reading “Jurisdictional challenges and arbitration clauses – that old chestnut! – The UK perspective”

Expedited Arbitrations: Can We Learn Anything from Adjudications?

By Luis Duhart

Introduction

Construction projects are a ripe ground for disputes. When these disputes arise, they often threaten to bring the project itself to a halt if not resolved expeditiously. However, many large-scale construction projects (particularly international ones) provide for their disputes to be referred to arbitration. Continue reading “Expedited Arbitrations: Can We Learn Anything from Adjudications?”

Growing Acceptance and Benefits of International Arbitration in the Banking and Finance Industries

By Nicole Mirjanich Moore

The banking and finance industries have historically chosen litigation as their preferred dispute resolution, generally in the New York or London courts. Due to increased globalization and participation from emerging markets (e.g., Africa and Asia), international arbitration of banking and finance disputes is rising in popularity. Continue reading “Growing Acceptance and Benefits of International Arbitration in the Banking and Finance Industries”

Future of International Energy Arbitration – Trends

Queen Mary University of London has undertaken a major International Arbitration Survey, focusing on the energy sector entitled “Future of International Energy Arbitration, Survey Report 2022”. This was led by Professor Loukas Mistelis FCArb[1] and his team. The Survey was based on feedback from over 900 respondents from a diverse range of jurisdictions, end users, leading practitioners, arbitrators and experts, as well as arbitral and academic institutions. Continue reading “Future of International Energy Arbitration – Trends”

Embracing Technology in Arbitrations

The global pandemic continues to challenge us, with various measures ranging from further lockdowns to restrictions on in-person meetings. The judicial machinery, including that in the arbitration world, has continued to function throughout the pandemic notwithstanding the difficulties of embracing innovative processes and new technology.

To read the full text of this post by Duane Morris partner Vijay K. Bange, please visit the Duane Morris London Blog.

Achmea Case Re-Opens Unanswered Questions for Intra-EU Arbitrations

The impact and uncertainty caused by the Achmea case on investor state dispute settlement provisions contained in intra-EU Bilateral Investment Treaties continues. These issues are potentially far reaching and may extend further than originally envisaged, namely that this case was arguably specific to the BIT between Netherlands and Slovakia.

To read the full text of this post by Duane Morris partner Vijay K. Bange, please visit the Duane Morris London Blog.

The Global Push to Green Energy

Globally, notable incidents of freak weather events giving rise to destruction and death have dominated the news. The increasing frequency of these erratic climate events has undoubtedly raised awareness of global warming and, on a political level, the need for states to move quicker towards green energy and the reduction of carbon emissions. Global warming is an inescapable issue that affects us all and which has forced governments to elevate this to the top of the agenda, filtering down to economic policies that will touch upon most industry sectors.

To read the full text of this post by Duane Morris partner Vijay K. Bange, please visit the Duane Morris London Blog.

Construction, Engineering and Energy Trends Across the Globe

Problems will inevitably arise with complex large infrastructure projects. Understanding the underlying reasons and what the root causes are will perhaps aid in the process of reducing conflict.

Recently a paper was published in Construction Law (August 2021) (co-authored by my colleague Tanya Chadha, and with contributions from US partners Brad Thompson and Jeffrey Hamera, and Paul Mansell of HKA) (“The root cause of evil!” Construction Law, August 2021). An analysis was undertaken of HKA’s integrated research program that collects data on global claims/ disputes across 88 countries. An examination was undertaken of trends emerging across the UK, Middle East, US, Caribbean and Latin America.

To read the full text of this post by Duane Morris partner Vijay K. Bange, please visit the Duane Morris London Blog.

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The opinions expressed on this blog are those of the author and are not to be construed as legal advice.

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