Tag Archives: jobs act

David N. Feldman

Bill Would Allow Reporting Companies to Use Reg A+

The House Financial Services Committee recently approved a bill that would permit full SEC reporting companies to use Tier 2 of Regulation A+ to effect a streamlined, lower cost public offering of their securities. The bill now moves to the full House. In implementing rules under the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act in 2015, the SEC retained the historical restriction that only non-reporting companies could utilize Reg A. There was really no particular reason this could not have been changed.

Now that practitioners have witnessed the closing of well over 30 Reg A+ deals, three of which are now successfully trading on national exchanges, it would seem logical to expand the availability of Reg A+ to reporting companies. They would have a history of full disclosure, and could clearly benefit from utilizing a faster and cheaper option to raise money from the public. OTC Markets, Inc. had submitted a petition several years ago that encouraged this, and Duane Morris submitted a letter to the SEC in support of that petition. Presumably this would only benefit companies that are not eligible for short registration Form S-3, including companies with less than a $75 million market cap and trading over-the-counter.

As noted in Crowdfund Insider, the new Republican-led SEC could, on its own, simply implement this change and avoid the need for Congress to pass a bill. There are some questions to address, however, such as would the relaxed financial reporting requirements apply before the offering is approved by the SEC? Would the testing the waters rules be the same? It will be interesting to see if this develops further.

David N. Feldman

SEC Reopens the Front Door for Small Cap Listings as First Regulation A+ IPO Trades on National Exchange

Duane Morris client Myomo Inc., a medical robotics company, completed its initial public offering on June 9, 2017 under SEC Regulation A+ created under the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act of 2012. The historic deal is the first Reg A+ IPO to be listed on a national exchange. In the IPO, Myomo raised a total of approximately $8 million between the public offering and a contemporaneous private offering of investment units. The stock commenced trading with the symbol “MYO” on the NYSE MKT on Monday, June 12, 2017.

For various reasons that have been studied extensively, smaller company IPOs, which proliferated in the 1990s, nearly disappeared starting around 2000. Other alternatives, including reverse mergers, often called “back door listings” because they are completed without advance SEC review, took their place until 2011 when the SEC added significant regulatory burdens to these transactions. A movement to update Regulation A to “reopen the front door” at the SEC started at the annual SEC small business conference in 2010.

Regulation A reforms were then included in Title IV of the JOBS Act. The law significantly increased the amount which a company can raise under what we now call Reg A+ from $5 million to $50 million and fully preempted all state “blue sky” review of those offerings, relieving significant regulatory and cost burdens. The final Reg A+ rules passed by the SEC under the JOBS Act also broadened the ability of Reg A+ issuers to “test the waters” with all potential investors both before and after filing their offering statement with the SEC. In addition, non-listed companies have somewhat scaled disclosure in their IPO as compared to a traditional registration.

The Reg A+ rules also permit non-listed companies a “light reporting” option after their IPO, further reducing costs and burdens as a public company while retaining strong investor protections. The SEC also has given extremely limited review to these filings, and has reported an average of 74 days from initial filing to SEC approval or “qualification.” As a result, companies are reporting a speedier, more cost-efficient and simpler process in completing their Reg A+ offerings than with traditional IPOs.

To date, the SEC has reported that dozens of Reg A+ deals have been consummated and hundreds of millions of dollars raised since the SEC’s final rules were implemented in 2015. Only a handful of these companies, however, have commenced trading their stock. To have completed the first Reg A+ deal to trade on a national exchange, therefore, is a very significant development for those working to redevelop a strong new IPO market for smaller companies.

David N. Feldman

SEC Proposes Expansion of Those Eligible For Scaled Reporting as “Smaller Reporting Companies”

On June 27, 2016, the SEC released a proposal that would increase the number of companies eligible to be “smaller reporting companies.” SRCs get the benefits of reduced disclosure over other public companies, such as two years of financial statements instead of three. To be an SRC, currently you have to have a public trading float value below $75 million, or if your float is zero, then revenues less than $50 million. The SEC is proposing increasing these thresholds to either a public float of less than $250 million, or if no float, then revenues of less than $100 million.

The JOBS Act created “emerging growth companies” (EGCs) which get some of the same benefits as SRCs. But EGC benefits go away with time whereas the SRC benefits do not. Plus, companies that went public before the JOBS Act generally cannot be EGCs. So why is all this cool? Because it was recommended multiple times at the annual SEC small business conference by folks like your humble blogger, and also by the SEC’s advisory committee on small and emerging companies.

Why else is it cool? Because the pool of SRCs has dropped from 42% to 32% of all public companies since the SRC rules were set up. So fewer companies get the benefit. With these proposed changes the SEC projects it would go back to 42%.

David N. Feldman

SEC Completes JOBS & FAST Act Rulemakings

Last week the SEC proudly announced the completion of its rulemaking obligations under the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act of 2012 and the mini-JOBS Act 2.0 tacked onto the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act. The last rules had to do with implementing the increase in the number of shareholders triggering an obligation to become a full SEC reporting company. They also spent lots of time on the Regulation A+ rules and new Regulation CF for “statutory” crowdfunding which are also complete. CF is just days away from being effective, the Reg A+ rules have been in effect almost a year now.

There is other work still pending under JOBS. For example, the SEC recently put out a 300+ page concept release talking about ideas to modernize some of the disclosure requirements in SEC Regulation S-K. The JOBS Act mandates that they examine this and hopefully implement some changes. One of the most interesting, which I’ve been pushing for years: let’s allow smaller public companies to eliminate burdensome disclosure requirements if they are not material to an investor’s understanding of the company. This is similar to SEC rules for disclosure in private companies to non-accredited investors. But this is still developing.

The last rule change? Per the SEC release, “As a result of JOBS Act and FAST Act changes, an issuer that is not a bank, bank holding company or savings and loan holding company is required to register a class of equity securities under the Exchange Act if it has more than $10 million of total assets and the securities are ‘held of record’ by either 2,000 persons, or 500 persons who are not accredited investors.  An issuer that is a bank, bank holding company or savings and loan holding company is required to register a class of equity securities if it has more than $10 million of total assets and the securities are ‘held of record’ by 2,000 or more persons.” This is good.

SEC Rule Proposal Would Permit Public Offerings in “Private Placements” and Facilitate Capital Formation

As required by the JOBS Act, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has proposed rules to eliminate the prohibition on general solicitation and general advertising in private placements exempt from registration by Rule 506 under the Securities Act of 1933, as long as all purchasers of the securities are accredited investors. The elimination of the prohibition on general solicitation and general advertising will result in issuers being able to attract a wider variety of investors with less cost. Increased competition for quality investments could also improve terms for issuers, reducing their cost of capital.

The firm’s client alert regarding the SEC’s proposal may be accessed here.

SEC Opts to Take Its Time and Try To Get The Rule Right

In this year’s Jumpstarting Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act, Congress eliminated the prohibition on general solicitation or advertising in connection with private offerings of securities and required the SEC to adopt and implement Congress’s mandate via rulemaking within 90 days of the effective date of the Act. To meet this deadline, the SEC would have needed to issue an interim rule, which would have had an immediate impact on how capital raisers communicate with investors and the broader public.

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SEC Report to Congress On Decimalization: Prelude or Punt?

On July 20, 2012, as required by Section 106 of the JOBS Act, the SEC released its study on the effects of decimalization (i.e., the trading and quoting of securities in increments of $.01) on initial public offerings and the liquidity of small-cap and middle-cap company securities.

In conducting its study, the SEC took a three-pronged approach consisting of (a) a review of empirical studies regarding tick size and decimalization, (b) participation in discussions held as part of a meeting of the SEC Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies concerning the impact of market structure on small- and mid-cap companies and on IPOs, and (c) a survey of tick-size conventions in non-US markets.

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Give Us Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Companies Seeking Capital… The JOBS Act: A New Path to Prosperity or an Opening for Securities Fraud?

After years of (perhaps excessive) regulation aimed at promoting transparency and accountability, the JOBS Act, signed by the President and overwhelmingly passed by Congress, undoes many of these requirements for companies that have the least experience in providing appropriate information upon which an investor can base its investment decision. It may also open the gateway for investors who arguably aren’t armed with the financial knowledge to protect themselves – they may just put it all on red and let it ride.

Continue reading Give Us Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Companies Seeking Capital… The JOBS Act: A New Path to Prosperity or an Opening for Securities Fraud?