Tag Archives: mark bradford

In Its October-2018 Term, the Supreme Court of the United States Will Address Whether the Court or a Panel of Arbitrators Decides Applicability of the Federal Arbitration Act Where the Parties Have Delegated Questions of Arbitrability to the Arbitrators

On February 26, 2018, the Supreme Court of the United States granted certiorari in Oliveira v. New Prime, Inc., 857 F.3d 7 (1st Cir. 2017), cert. granted, 2018 WL 1037577 (U.S. Feb. 26, 2018) (No. 17-340), and added the case to its October-2018 Term. The Court will resolve a circuit split which has developed among the First, Eighth, and Ninth Circuits, in addition to division among lower federal and state courts, regarding gateway questions of arbitrability under the Section 1 definitions and exemptions of the FAA. More specifically, the Court will again address efforts by lower courts to avoid the broad mandate under the FAA in favor of the enforcement of arbitration agreements in the context of an arbitration agreement containing an express class waiver provision.

The FAA applies to “[a] written provision in any maritime transaction or a contract evidencing a transaction involving commerce to settle by arbitration . . . .” 9 U.S.C. §2 (emphasis added). At issue in New Prime (and the circuit split before SCOTUS), is the intersection of the FAA’s definition of commerce which provides for various exceptions including one for “any other class of workers engaged in foreign or interstate commerce”, 9 U.S.C. §1, and the Supreme Court’s directive that “[a]n agreement to arbitrate a gateway issue is simply an additional, antecedent agreement the party seeking arbitration asks the federal court to enforce”. Rent-A-Center, West, Inc. v. Jackson, 561 U.S. 63, 70 (2010). Couched broadly, the question before the Supreme Court is whether a party who wishes to avoid an agreement to arbitrate questions of arbitrability can do so by presenting the dispute as one of statutory interpretation under the FAA. In other words, how broad is the mandate of Rent-A-Center. Such a question may hold similarities to the age old quandary which came first, the chicken or the egg.

Legal questions concerning the enforcement of arbitration agreements and initial questions of arbitrability under the FAA remain points of heated contention. One of the benefits of arbitration is a streamlined process where discovery (and its attendant costs) can be moderated and controlled before a panel of subject matter experts who bring reinsurance, insurance, or other expertise to the dispute at hand. Those efficiencies are much more difficult to realize if courts engage in lengthy proceedings, including discovery and the weighing of evidence, to determine gateway factual questions about arbitrability where the parties contracted to submit questions of arbitrability, i.e. the arbitrator’s jurisdiction among other issues, to the arbitrators.

The Illinois Duty to Defend: Litigation Insurance against Groundless Suits Even When Extrinsic Facts Known to Both Insurer and Insured Would Otherwise Abrogate Coverage

On January 13, 2015, the Illinois Appellate Court issued its opinion in Illinois Tool Works, Inc. v. Travelers Casualty and Surety Co., 2015 IL App. (1st) 132350 (1st Dist. 2015), wherein the court held the insurer had a duty to defend its insured against numerous vaguely pleaded toxic tort complaints. The central issue in Illinois Tool Works was whether facts extrinsic to the underlying complaint, known to both the insurer and insured, can abrogate the duty to defend. The Illinois Appellate Court held that undisputed extrinsic facts not pleaded in the underlying complaint cannot relieve an insurer of its duty to defend unless and until proven in the underlying action. Continue reading The Illinois Duty to Defend: Litigation Insurance against Groundless Suits Even When Extrinsic Facts Known to Both Insurer and Insured Would Otherwise Abrogate Coverage

Duane Morris Chicago Office Adds Trial Partners Tomas M. Thompson and Mark A. Bradford

Duane Morris LLP is pleased to announce that Tomas M. Thompson and Mark A. Bradford have joined the firm’s Trial Practice Group as partners in the firm’s Chicago office. Thompson and Bradford, who join from DLA Piper, follow the addition in the firm’s Chicago office of partners Mark D. Belongia and Lisa T. Scruggs, associate David B. Shafer and associate Brian L. Dougherty.

Continue reading Duane Morris Chicago Office Adds Trial Partners Tomas M. Thompson and Mark A. Bradford