Pennsylvania files for Opportunity Zones for 10-year tax deferred investments in community development

On April 20, 2018, Governor Tom Wolf submitted to U.S. Treasury his list of designated Opportunity Zone sites for Pennsylvania. To date, 18 states and territories—including Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Kentucky, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Jersey, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont and Wisconsin, as well as American Samoa, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands—have filed for and received approval of their sites. Pennsylvania has now followed suit and submitted its list for approval. Previously, we discussed Opportunity Zones in our Alerts dated March 1 and April 10, 2018.

Designations are approved for 10 years and permit investors to defer tax on any prior gains until no later than December 31, 2026, so long as the gain is reinvested in a Qualified Opportunity Fund. A Qualified Opportunity Fund is an investment vehicle that is organized to make investments in the zones designated above as Qualified Opportunity Zones. Note that while we are awaiting draft regulations, which are anticipated within the next 60 days (i.e., by June 30, 2018), it appears that if investors hold their investments in the Opportunity Fund for at least 10 years, they would be able to increase its basis to that of the fair market value of the investment on the date it is sold. In other words, their appreciation in the value of the asset thereafter would be tax-free.

Read the full Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

18 states and U.S. territories obtain Qualified Opportunity Zones for development investment

As a follow-up to our Alert from March 1, 2018, on April 9, the IRS and U.S. Treasury approved designated Opportunity Zones in 18 states and territories—including Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Kentucky, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Jersey, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont and Wisconsin, as well as American Samoa, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Designations are approved for 10 years and permit investors to defer tax on any prior gains until no later than December 31, 2026, so long as the gain is reinvested in a Qualified Opportunity Fund. A Qualified Opportunity Fund as an investment vehicle that is organized to make investments in the zones designated above as Qualified Opportunity Zones. Note, that while we still await draft regulations, it appears that if investors hold their investments in the Opportunity Fund for at least 10 years, the investor would be able to increase its basis to that of the fair market value of the investment on the date it is sold—in other words, their appreciation in the value of the asset would be tax free.

While sounding almost too good to be true, the rationale of allowing for this type of appreciation treatment is to attempt to incentivize additional or initial investment in the designated low-income areas in an effort to boost economic growth and job creation.

Read the full Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

Qualified Opportunity Zones: Congress’ plan for community development

On December 22, 2017, as part of Congress’ House Resolution 1, the concept of a Qualified Opportunity Zone (QOZ) was added to the toolbox of potential community development tools. In this Alert, we explain what a QOZ is and offer strategies to help real estate developers take advantage of the benefits of QOZs. In short, an investment in a Qualified Opportunity Fund that is in turn invested within a QOZ is entitled to certain tax deferral of capital gains, certain basis step-up (which will lower tax on sale/disposition) and, if held long enough (10 years or more), the ability to not have to pay tax on the appreciation of investment within the fund beyond the initial deferred gain. As explained below, QOZs are in low-income areas; thereby, investment in these areas is incented by the creation of the ability to defer gain within them.

Read the full text of this article.

President announces framework for infrastructure improvement

On February 12, 2018, President Donald Trump announced his administration’s long-awaited framework for rebuilding infrastructure in America. The 53-page white paper, entitled “Legislative Outline for Rebuilding Infrastructure in America” (the “Plan”), sets out the White House’s proposal to dedicate federal dollars, empower and encourage local spending, and attract significant private sector investment in a wide range of infrastructure project initiatives. In particular, the Plan proposes a federal investment of $200 billion into the nation’s infrastructure in order to stimulate at least $1.5 trillion in new infrastructure investment over the next 10 years. The Plan also proposes to shorten the approval process for certain projects (as highlighted in the president’s State of the Union address)[1] and train the American workforce of the future.

Read the full text of this article.