Tag Archives: Adult Use

New Jersey – One step closer to Adult Use, Recreational Marijuana Legalization

Earlier this week, Governor Murphy, Senate President Stephen Sweeney, D-3rd District, and Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin, D-19th District, reached a tentative agreement on key pieces of adult use marijuana legislation, overcoming one of the key sticking points of how to tax the product sales, reaching a collective consensus of a $42 an ounce tax.

According to a recent Monmouth University Poll, 6 in 10 New Jersey adults support legalizing recreational marijuana. The February poll interviewed 604 New Jersey adults between Feb. 8 and 10, found that 62% of respondents favored legalizing small amounts of marijuana for personal use, compared to 32% of adults who said no to the prospect of legal marijuana in New Jersey.

68% of respondents said it would support the state economy, while 40% of respondents who support legal cannabis said it would boost tax revenue for New Jersey.
From an age perspective, 81% of millennials (i.e., ages 18 to 34), support legalizing marijuana, compared to 74% of adults ages 35 to 54, and 67% of adults 55 and older.

One of the other bones of contention that was overcome involved who will control the oversight commission. The current agreement would create a 5-member Cannabis Regulatory Commission to oversee the state’s marijuana industry, and Governor Murphy would be able to appoint 3 of the members without requiring Senate approval.

A earlier New Jersey marijuana legalization bill that was advanced by Assembly and Senate commitees in the fall of 2018 included a 12% sales tax. Under the Monday compromise, adult use marijuana purchasers will pay the same tax rate no matter what amount they purchased – meaning, $42 for an ounce, $21 for a half-ounce, $10.50 for a quarter-ounce or $5.25 for an eighth-ounce.

The Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee vote was 7-4 in favor, while the Assembly Appropriations Committee voted 7-3 to advance the bill. If legislation is moved, the “Marijuana Legalization Act” would allow users 21 years old and up to possess up to an ounce of marijuana.

High Cannabis Taxes Could Help Grow California’s Black Market

As California gears up to issue the first set of adult-use cannabis licenses on January 1, 2018, state and local taxes on adult-use cannabis may reach as high as 45% in some parts of the state. According to a recent report by Fitch Ratings, cannabis consumers are expected to pay a sales tax ranging from 22.25% to 24.25%, which includes an excise tax of 15%, and additional state and local sales taxes ranging from 7.25% to 9.25%. Local cannabis businesses will have to pay taxes ranging from 1% to 20% of gross receipts, or $1 to $50 per square foot of cannabis plants, and farmers will be taxed $9.25 per ounce for flower, and $2.75 per ounce for leaves.

These rates are considerably more than in other states that have already legalized adult-use cannabis.  Colorado and Nevada, for example, each have a tax rate of 36%. Oregon comes in at 20% and Alaska has a rate of up to 20%. Massachusetts, which legalized adult-use cannabis, and should begin retail cannabis sales in July 2018, is expected to have a tax rate of 24%. Maine has not established a tax rate yet. Washington is the only other state with higher taxes, at an effective tax rate of approximately 50%.

The legitimate cannabis industry in California has a projected value of $7 billion with the potential to collect $1 billion per year in tax revenue. However, industry leaders in California believe that a higher effective tax rates on consumers, retailers and growers could potentially divert sales to the already well-established cannabis black market. For example, the black market price for an eighth of an ounce of cannabis is approximately $20, as opposed to approximately $50 at a licensed dispensary. High taxes, coupled with a cheaper source of product, could ultimately hamper California’s efforts to legitimize the cannabis industry.  However, since legal cannabis is subject to stringent quality assurance testing which will be overseen by the California Bureau of Cannabis Control, consumers may be willing to pay a premium to ensure that they are getting a better, safer product than they would on the black market.