Tag Archives: charles fastenberg

Duane Morris’ Charles Fastenberg to Present Lorman Educational Services Webinar on “Understanding New York Public Contracts and Procurement Regulations”

Duane Morris special counsel Charles Fastenberg of the firm’s New York office will present the Lorman Educational Services webinar, “Understanding New York Public Contracts and Procurement Regulations,” on Thursday, October 6, 2016, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. (Eastern time). This webinar will provide insights for contractors and vendors so they are aware of unanticipated issues they may face when submitting bids for contracts.

For more information, please see the event posting on the Duane Morris website.

Recent Changes in New York City’s Standard Construction Contract

With its new Standard Construction Contract, issued in December 2013, the City of New York (the “City”) has implemented numerous significant changes as compared with its 2008 standard contract. The most widely discussed change in the City’s standard construction contract is the elimination of an express “no damage for delay” clause. At least ostensibly, the new contract represents a more flexible approach to delay damages by enabling the contractor to recover for delays in factual settings not previously amenable to delay claims. This Alert briefly summarizes some of the new provisions.

Click here to read the full Alert.

City Of New York Amends Its M/W/EBE Law

New York City Local Law 1–2013, effective July 1, 2013, amends the City’s laws concerning participation by Minority-Owned, Women-Owned, and Emerging Business Enterprises (“M/W/EBE”) in City contracts. The City’s M/W/EBE laws, including the amendments, are imposed upon the individual agencies and serve to guide the agencies in the administration of M/W/EBE programs under their respective contracts; these laws are not imposed directly upon the contractors and vendors themselves. Among the amendments concerning construction contracts are a reduction in the participation goals for African-American and Hispanic-Americans and increased goals for WBEs. The $1 million cap for eligibility as a “disadvantaged” entity has been removed.

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