Rick Ball to Speak at FDLI’s Introduction to Drug Law and Regulation Event

Duane Morris partner Rick Ball will be a speaker at FDLI’s “Introduction to Drug Law and Regulation,” a virtual course to be held on April 28, 2022. Mr. Ball’s topic will be “Violations and Enforcement.”

About the Program

Explore the essentials of drug law and regulation and gain a comprehensive understanding of the administrative agencies that impact this industry. Learn about patent and exclusivity issues, Rx to OTC switches, Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), advertising and promotion, compliance, enforcement, and related issues. Case studies, hypotheticals, and ample time for Q&A are provided.

To learn more about this program and register, please visit the FDLI website.

FDA Final Guidance on Initiating Voluntary Recalls: Be “Recall Ready”

On March 4, 2022, FDA issued a final guidance to industry and FDA staff regarding the initiation of voluntary recalls under 21 CFR part 7, subpart C. The guidance applies to voluntary recalls of products subject to FDA’s jurisdiction, including any:

    1. Food, drug and device (human or animal use);
    2. Cosmetic and biological product (human use);
    3. Tobacco product;
    4. Item subject to a quarantine regulation under 21 CFR part 1240; and
    5. Devices that are electronic products regulated as radiology devices (subject to 21 CFR part 892) but not electronic products subject to 21 CFR parts 1003 and 1004.

In short, the final guidance clarifies FDA’s recommendations on how a firm should be prepared to facilitate the timely initiation of voluntary recalls, steps a firm should take if there is an indication of a problem with a distributed product and how to initiate voluntary recalls. The final guidance also explains how FDA works with firms to initiate a voluntary recall.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

DOJ Reinstates and Augments Prior Corporate Criminal Enforcement Policies

On October 28, 2021, Deputy United States Attorney General Lisa Monaco issued a memorandum marking the first major announcement on corporate criminal enforcement from the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) under the Biden Administration (“Monaco Memo”). Most notably, this memorandum: (1) reinstates the Individual Accountability Policy originally announced in the Yates Memo and (2) guides prosecutors to look at all prior misconduct, not just those instances similar to the misconduct at issue in the present investigation.

To read the full text of this post by Duane Morris attorneys Rick Ball, Eric Breslin and Brittany Pagnotta, please visit the Duane Morris White-Collar Criminal Law Blog.

Could COVID-19 Data Help Medical Device Manufacturers Accelerate the FDA Approval Process?

Medical device shortages and shortcomings during the COVID-19 pandemic have led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to grant Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to many medical devices manufacturers. Were it not for these EUAs, these manufacturers would be unable to market their devices, as their FDA applications would still be pending. Once the present “emergency” ends, these EUAs will expire, and manufacturers will again be unable to market their devices for the indications cleared under the EUA.

Still, the real-world evidence (RWE) gained about these devices while marketed under the EUA need not be lost with the passing of the pandemic. Once the pandemic ends, manufacturers should be able to use the data collected to support their pending applications for market clearance and for new indications for already-cleared devices.

To read the full text of this article by Duane Morris partners Frederick R. Ball and Erin M. Duffy, please visit the Wharton Health Care Management Alumni Association website.

FDA’s New MAPP Shows the Route to Changing Ownership of Generic Drug Applications

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) recently issued a new Manual of Policies and Procedures (MAPP), in which it explains the Office of Generic Drugs’ (OGD) policy on facilitating changes to generic drug applications and updating the Orange Book to reflect those changes.

MAPP 5242.1 makes clear that the policies, processes and procedures for changing ownership of an application differ based on whether the change is effected by a simple transfer of ownership or whether it results from a corporate merger or acquisition.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

FDA Postpones Foreign Inspections Through April in Response to COVID-19

FDA announced on March 10, 2020, that the agency is postponing most foreign inspections through April, effective immediately. FDA will consider whether to conduct inspections outside the U.S. deemed mission-critical on a case-by-case basis.

Postponing foreign inspection will likely delay product application reviews that require facility inspections. FDA has committed to trying to mitigate any potential impact that the COVID-19 outbreak and suspension of foreign inspections may have regarding FDA action on product applications. The extent of that impact will likely depend on how soon foreign inspections can resume and the resources, including personnel, available to FDA once they resume.

View the full Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

FDA’s Bark May Be Worse Than Its Bite: Revised Guidance Permits Certain Compounding of Animal Drugs from Bulk Drug Substances

On November 19, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released revised guidance concerning the compounding of animal drugs from bulk drug substances—in particular, the circumstances under which the FDA would not plan to take enforcement action for certain violations of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) when pharmacists and veterinarians compound or oversee the compounding of animal drugs from bulk drug substances. The guidance is intended to replace a withdrawn draft guidance concerning the compounding of animal drugs initially released in May 2015.

View the full Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

In a Regulatory “One-Two,” FDA Modifies Terms of Oversight Concerning Homeopathic Drugs

Late last week, the FDA—in denying a citizen petition and issuing two Federal Register notices—modified published guidance on the manufacture and distribution of homeopathic drugs and declined to convert a current policy guide (CPG) provision into an official regulation. Importantly, the FDA cautioned industry participants and consumers alike that its CPG withdrawal “does not represent a change in the legal obligations that apply to homeopathic drugs”; rather, the CPG—issued in 1988—merely no longer reflects the “current thinking” of the FDA, as it is inconsistent with the agency’s “risk-based approach to enforcement generally.”

View the full Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

Federal Agencies Issue Draft Guidance for Drug Master Files for First Time in 30 Years

For the first time since September 1989, federal agencies have issued draft guidance concerning drug master files (DMFs), submissions to the FDA that may be used to provide confidential, detailed information concerning the manufacturing, processing, packaging and storing of human drug products. Notably, the release of this draft guidance comes on the heels of a recent executive order by President Trump aiming to curb the use of agency guidance documents to avoid the formal rule-making process.

View the full Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

Discovery Ruling in District of Minnesota May Have Far-Reaching Implications for FCA Defendants

In a concise, six-page discovery order, a federal judge in Minneapolis may have just started the proverbial shifting of tectonic plates undergirding routine defense procedures in False Claims Act (FCA) litigation by requiring a defendant in an FCA lawsuit to produce the information provided to the Department of Justice (DOJ) during the DOJ’s process of determining whether to pursue the matter.

The FCA creates liability for persons or entities found to have knowingly submitted false claims to the government or having caused others to do so. Like some other federal laws, the FCA creates a private right of action; under the act, a private party—a whistleblower or “relator”—may bring a qui tam action on behalf of the government. When initially filed, the court seals the complaint pending the government’s investigation of the case. If the government chooses, it may intervene and pursue the matter. If not, the relator may pursue the case on its own. (In either case, the relator is entitled to a percentage of the government’s recovery.)

View the full Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

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The opinions expressed on this blog are those of the author and are not to be construed as legal advice.

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