EPA’s PFAS Reporting Rule Requires Data Going Back to 2011

On September 28, 2023, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its final Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Section 8(a) reporting rule. It expands reporting and recordkeeping requirements for companies that have manufactured or imported per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) for a commercial purpose—whether as a chemical substance or in a mixture or article—since January 1, 2011. Entities subject to this rule will need to submit reporting forms for retrospective data either 18 or 24 months following the rule’s effective date, which is 30 days after its publication in the Federal Register.

Read the full Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

EPA Looking to Expand PFAS Substances Regulated under Superfund

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On September 6, 2022, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (“USEPA”) had previously issued a notice of proposed rulemaking to designate two (2) specific PFAS substances, known as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) as CERCLA hazardous substances. We have previously blogged about this Notice and it can be found on our website if of interest. The comment period to that proposed rulemaking has now closed and USEPA is presently evaluating comments received.

In the meantime, however, USEPA is considering a new initiative to expand the list of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (“CERCLA”) regulated PFAS beyond PFOA and PFOS to include seven (7) additional PFAS, their salts and precursors and, possibly, certain categories of PFAS.

In a pre-publication notice issued by the USEPA on April 13, 2023 (to be published in the Federal Register on that same date), USEPA announced its intention to consider expansion of its CERCLA hazardous substances list developed under potentially to include seven (7) additional per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) on that list.

As set forth in the pre-publication notice, additional PFAS under consideration for regulation includes:

Perfluorobutanesulfonic acid (PFBS), CASRN 375-73-5;
Perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS), CASRN 355-46-4;
Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), CASRN 375-95-1;
Hexafluoropropylene oxide dimer acid (HFPO-DA), CASRN 13252-13-6 (sometimes called GenX);
Perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA) CASRN 375-22-4;
Perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) CASRN 307-24-4; and
• Perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) CASRN 335-76-2.

Take Aways:

USEPA will also be giving consideration to the precursors to PFOA, PFOS, and other PFAS listed above as well as whether USEPA should take action to designate whole categories of PFAS based on shared characteristics among the PFAS listed in those categories.

To these ends, USEPA is seeking a variety of data sources and information to assist them is deciding whether to expand the CERCLA list. The Comment period will run until approximately July 6, 2023 (i.e., sixty (60) days from publication in the Federal Register which is anticipated on April 13, 2023).

Duane Morris has an active PFAS Team to help organizations and individuals plan, respond to, and execute on your PFAS issues and initiatives. We would be happy to discuss your concerns and objectives and how new rules, regulations and rulings might apply to you. For more information or if you have any questions about this post, please contact Lori Mills, the author, or Lindsay Brown, Sharon Caffrey, Brad A. Molotsky, Alice Shanahan,  Seth Cooley, Alyson Walker Lotman, Kelly Bonner, Sharon Caffrey or the attorney in the firm with whom you in regular contact or the attorney in the firm with whom you are regularly in contact.

EPA Now Taking Comments on Its PFAS Enforcement Discretion Policy

On September 6, 2022, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its proposed rulemaking to designate certain per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) as Hazardous Substances under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), which would have a significant legal impact across the country and create potential liability for PFAS release and/or contamination for a broad set of entities in numerous industries. Accordingly, the EPA has been developing an enforcement discretion policy and recently concluded two public listening sessions to seek stakeholder input on concerns about CERCLA enforcement for PFAS contamination. The EPA will review and consider the input received as it finalizes the CERCLA PFAS enforcement discretion policy.

Read the full text of this Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

PFAS Limits in Public Drinking Water Set Forth in Proposed EPA Rule

On March 14, 2023, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a proposed new National Primary Drinking Water Regulation (NPDWR), which standardizes and sets the legally enforceable maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) of six per- and polyfluoralkyl substances (PFAS) in drinking water. The proposed regulation also sets nonenforceable maximum contaminant level goals (MCLGs).

Read the full text of this Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

PFAS – Pennsylvania DEP Adopts new limits on 2 PFAS Chemicals – Required Testing, Reporting and Treatment

Earlier this past week, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (“DEP”) adopted new limits on two classes of PFAS chemicals.

Pennsylvania joins a growing list of states that have implemented limits and, in some cases, bans, on certain types of PFAS and PFOS chemicals. According to the new rule, Pennsylvania will now mandate that all public and private drinking water treatment facilities in the Commonwealth, together with schools and healthcare facilities, and  commercial bottled water plants, will all be required to test their water for PFAS and PFOS, report the findings and treat affected water for the chemicals present above the new maximum contaminant levels (MCLs).

Pennsylvania’s new regulations will restrict the PFAS compounds PFOS (perfluoro-octane sulfonic acid) at 14 parts per trillion, and PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid) at 18 parts per trillion.

Studies have indicated that over 97% of all humans have PFAS compounds in their blood stream that bio accumulates over time.

For decades, PFAS chemicals have been widely used in consumer products such as cosmetics, personal care products, furniture stain resistant applications, carpet stain guard, flame retardant fire fighting  foam (including foam used at all airports in the US), non-stick cookware, flame-retardant clothing, weather resistant outdoor clothing, some food packaging, as well as in firefighting foam used at current and decommissioned military bases.

While the new DEP regulations set the MCLs for these chemicals for the first time in Pennsylvania, critics have pressed for a lower MCL, for more PFAS compounds to be regulated and for private wells to be protected. 

New Jersey recently proposed a 4-bill set of additional PFAS restrictions and already restricts PFAS at 13 parts per trillion for PFOS and PFNA, and 14 parts per trillion for PFOA. Delaware is also considering regulations akin to Pennsylvania’s and has proposed implementing its own MCLs.

At the federal level, the Environmental Protection Agency is continuing to study PFAS and had set a federal health advisory level for PFAS, but unlike the PA MCLs, the federal advisory is just that, advisory, and, as such, is not per se actionable. As part of its ongoing effort to study and limit the effects of PFAS, in June, 2022, the EPA revised its prior advisory guidance set in 2016 at 70 parts per trillion down to .004 parts per trillion, after announcing the compounds were more concerning than EPA had previously thought.

Key Take Away – Pennsylvania joins a growing list of states that are actively reviewing and setting standards on what is acceptable and not in drinking water, soil, products, food packaging, and other consumer products. The new PA rule will require testing, reporting and treatment for affected water which exceeds the noted standard.

Duane Morris has an active PFAS Team to help organizations and individuals plan, respond to, and execute on your PFAS issues and initiatives. We would be happy to discussion your concerns and objectives and how new rules, regulations and rulings might apply to you. For more information or if you have any questions about this post, please contact Lindsay Brown, Brad A. Molotsky, Alyson Walker Lotman, Alice Shanahan,  Seth Cooley, Sharon Caffrey or the attorney in the firm with whom you in regular contact or the attorney in the firm with whom you are regularly in contact.

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The opinions expressed on this blog are those of the author and are not to be construed as legal advice.

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