Higher Education Institution and Student Relief in the CARES Act

The CARES Act appropriates $30.75 billion for an Education Stabilization Fund available through September 30, 2021, to assist governors and postsecondary institutions with preventing, preparing for and responding to COVID-19. The Act also includes important student relief and temporary regulatory flexibilities.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

Department of Education Issues Guidance on Safeguarding Civil Rights During COVID-19 Pandemic

As with all crises, this pandemic is a rapidly evolving situation that is forcing schools to quickly implement new policies and practices, often operating on limited information and without the usual procedural safeguards and vetting. Such an environment creates a risk of the unintended consequences of those new policies/procedures resulting in potentially discriminatory effects to students.

Recognizing this risk, the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights published guidance on March 16, 2020, reminding schools that students’ civil rights must be safeguarded during responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. OCR’s guidance encourages schools to take measures to protect against COVID-19, but to do so in a manner that is free from discrimination and continues to accommodate people with disabilities.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

California Attorney General’s Draft CCPA Regulations Continue to Evolve

On March 11, 2020, California’s Office of the Attorney General proposed a second set of revisions to the draft California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) regulations. These proposed regulations were first published on October 11, 2019, and summarized in our previous Alert. The most recent changes come on the heels of modifications to the regulations released on February 10, 2020, which were summarized in this Alert.

The deadline for providing comments to the second set of modified proposed regulations is March 27, 2020.

Overall, most of the changes were of a technical nature and not substantive.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, which highlights the notable changes, please visit the firm website.

U.S. Department of Education Issues COVID-19 Guidance to Schools

Due to the outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that institutions of higher education consider postponing or canceling upcoming study abroad or foreign exchange programs. However, this advice has raised pressing questions about how this would affect Title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) federal financial aid and a student’s ability to finish the term if a program is interrupted or canceled. In response, on March 5, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid (FSA) offered guidance permitting temporary flexibility and clarifying how higher education institutions can continue to comply with Title IV regulations for students whose activities are impacted by COVID-19.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

U.S. Department of Education Issues COVID-19 Guidance

Due to the outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that institutions of higher education consider postponing or canceling upcoming study abroad or foreign exchange programs. However, this advice has raised pressing questions about how this would affect Title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) federal financial aid and a student’s ability to finish the term if a program is interrupted or canceled. In response, on March 5, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid (FSA) offered guidance permitting temporary flexibility and clarifying how higher education institutions can continue to comply with Title IV regulations for students whose activities are impacted by COVID-19.

View the full Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

Cybersecurity Update: Protecting Student Data Critical to Continued Participation in the Federal Student Aid Programs

On February 28, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Federal Student Aid (FSA) issued an electronic announcement regarding the enforcement of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act’s (GLBA) cybersecurity requirements for all institutions of higher education participating in the Title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) federal student financial aid programs and their third-party servicers. The announcement states that auditors are expected to evaluate three GLBA information safeguard requirements in annual compliance audits of postsecondary institutions and third-party servicers. Any finding of noncompliance will be sent to both the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the FSA’s cybersecurity team for further investigation and potential adverse action. All Title IV participating institutions should consult with counsel about the very serious consequences and administrative actions that may be taken if they or their third-party servicers fail to meet the GLBA’s information security requirements.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

California Attorney General Proposes Modified CCPA Regulations – Overview of Significant Proposed Changes

On February 10, 2020, California’s Office of the Attorney General proposed a modified version of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) regulations first published on October 11, 2019. The initial proposed regulations were summarized in our previous Alert.

The deadline for providing comments on the modified proposed regulations is February 25, 2020. This Alert summarizes some of the most significant proposed changes to the regulations. A more detailed summary, including new practical CCPA examples, can be found in our blog posts regarding changes to: (1) definitions and consumer notice requirements; (2) requirements for consumer requests and verification; and (3) requirements for service providers, authorized agents, minors, nondiscrimination and calculating the value of consumer data.

View the full Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

Clery Act Compliance: October 1 Deadline for Colleges and Universities to Complete and Distribute Annual Security Report Is Fast Approaching

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, or Clery Act, 20 U.S.C. § 1092(f) (34 C.F.R. § 668.46), requires all schools, colleges and universities that participate in federal student financial aid programs to:

  1. Maintain and disclose to the public statistics, policies and programs about certain crimes occurring on and/or near a campus; and
  2. Have in place and be able to demonstrate implementation of specific campus safety policies, including those related to crimes of sexual violence.

Educational institutions must provide and distribute this information in a Clery Act Annual Security Report (ASR) by October 1, 2019. The U.S. Department of Education guidance specifies that this is a firm deadline; there is no grace period and no exemptions exist.

View the full Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

Webinar: How the CCPA Impacts the Higher Education Industry

The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 Webinar Series will be hosting its third installment, “How the CCPA Impacts the Higher Education Industry,” to be held on September 5, 2019. The webinar will be presented by Duane Morris attorneys Brandi A. Taylor and Michelle Hon Donovan.

Brandi Taylor
Brandi A. Taylor
Photo of attorney Michelle Hon Donovan
Michelle Hon Donovan

This session provides an overview of the new law and how it applies to schools and companies in the education sector. Nonprofit educational institutions are exempt from the new law. However, it will apply to any for-profit education institutions, service providers and technology companies that collect any information on California residents and meet any of the following criteria:

  • Have an annual gross revenue of $25 million or more;
  • Collect, sell or share for commercial purposes the personal information of at least 50,000 consumers, households or devices annually; or
  • Derive at least 50 percent of annual revenue from selling consumers’ personal information.

To register for this webinar, please visit the Duane Morris website.