Tag Archives: Tanvi Shah

Title IX Final Rule

On May 6, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education issued the Final Rule on Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (“Title IX”) regulations. These are the first comprehensive regulations issued under Title IX since 1975.

The Final Rule goes into effect on Friday, August 14, 2020.  Its provisions will significantly impact K-12 school districts, colleges, and universities. The changes include: a definition for sexual harassment, requirement for publication of Title IX materials, triggers for an institution’s legal obligation to respond and investigate, and a requirement that institutions conduct courtroom-like hearings. Continue reading Title IX Final Rule

U.S. Department of Education Issues Additional COVID-19 Guidance in Form of FAQs

In response to pressing questions from institutions, on March 5, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid (FSA) offered guidance permitting temporary flexibility and clarifying how higher education institutions whose activities are impacted by COVID-19 can continue to comply with Title IV of the Higher Education Act and its implementing regulations (“Title IV”) . You can read our client alert on the guidance here.

On March 20, 2020, the Department updated the announcement to include answers to frequently asked questions. The guidance provided by the Department in the FAQ is summarized below. Institutions should consult the guidance directly for additional information about any of the below topics. Continue reading U.S. Department of Education Issues Additional COVID-19 Guidance in Form of FAQs

Federal Student Loan Borrowers Catch a Break Amidst Coronavirus Chaos

As the coronavirus continues to impact jobs and financial stability across the nation, President Trump announced Friday that he will allow federal student loan borrowers to take a break from making their monthly payments without penalty for at least the next two months. The Education Department also announced that it would set the interest rates on all federally held student loans to zero until at least May 12.

To obtain the reprieve, borrowers must make a request of their loan servicers over the phone or online. However, the 60-day suspension will automatically apply to those who are already more than a month behind on their payments. With more than 3.2 million federally-held student loans over a month delinquent and another 7.7 million in default, according to the Education Department’s most recent quarterly data, the Department hopes that the option will allow borrowers to focus on health and safety during these anxious times. Continue reading Federal Student Loan Borrowers Catch a Break Amidst Coronavirus Chaos