California’s COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave Law: No Longer Effective, but Employers Beware

On September 9, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom enacted a law requiring all California employers with more than 500 employees, as well as certain industries exempted from the Families First Coronavirus Recovery Act (FFCRA), to provide up to 80 hours of supplemental paid sick leave to employees for COVID-related reasons. This law was set to sunset on the later of December 31, 2020, or upon the expiration of any extension of Emergency Paid Sick Leave under the FFCRA. As Congress has not extended the federal Emergency Paid Sick Leave requirements, California’s supplemental paid sick leave requirements are no longer effective as of January 1, 2021.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

California’s New Extensive COVID-19 Safety and Health Regulations Include Employer-Required Testing

California has enacted new and detailed emergency safety and health regulations affecting virtually anyone who runs a business, school or other enterprise in the Golden State. California’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA) has issued emergency temporary standards for COVID-19 to clarify employer obligations during the pandemic and to prevent outbreaks. The new standards took effect November 30, 2020, and will remain in effect until May 30, 2021, subject to extension or adoption as a permanent regulation.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

California Issues Restrictive Regional Stay Home Order Tied to Hospital ICU Capacity

As COVID-19 cases escalate dramatically in California, health officials in the state announced a Regional Stay Home Order on December 3, 2020, intended to help flatten the rapidly rising curve and to assist hospitals in managing intensive care unit (ICU) capacity. The order severely restricts business activities, prohibits gatherings and requires masking and physical distancing. It modifies the state’s initial stay-at-home order issued by the governor in March and builds on the state’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

New COVID-19 Reporting Obligations for California Employers Take Effect January 1, 2021

Employers with workers in California, get ready! New reporting requirements for COVID-19 exposures at work take effect January 1, 2021. AB 685 imposes obligations for private and public employers to quickly notify employees and employers of subcontracted employees of COVID-19 exposures and to notify public health officials of outbreaks in the workplace. The new law permits the California Division of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to shut down a workplace due to COVID-19.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

COVID-19 Business Income Loss Suit Dismissed by California Court

Last week, Judge Birotte Jr. of the Central District of California dismissed a declaratory relief and bad faith action against Travelers Indemnity Company of Connecticut seeking coverage for COVID-19 business income losses. Plaintiff, a Los Angeles-based restaurant significantly impacted by COVID-19, held a policy with Travelers that it alleged provided coverage for COVID-19 losses.

To read the full text of this post by Duane Morris attorney Gina Foran, please visit the Duane Morris Insurance Law Blog.

California’s Large Employers Are on the Hook for Supplemental Paid Sick Leave

Employers with workers in California, take note. A new supplemental paid sick leave law related to COVID-19 takes effect this month. On September 9, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed AB 1867 (now known as Labor Code section 248 and 248.1) into law. Beginning September 19, 2020, all employers with more than 500 employees or who are otherwise exempt from the requirement to provide paid leave under the Families First Coronavirus Recovery Act (FFCRA) are now required to provide up to 80 hours of supplemental paid sick leave to employees for COVID-related reasons.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

California Announces New “Blueprint For A Safer Economy” That Includes Significant Changes to Reopening Guidance

By Brooke Tabshouri

After being the first state to shut down its whole economy in mid-March response to the COVID-19 crisis, California began reopening in May.  After attempting to do so on a statewide basis, reopening was primarily driven at the county level, with some counties permitted to reopen various parts of the economy before others.  The state then experienced a huge surge of cases shortly thereafter, leading to a reimposition of many restrictions, particularly with regard to bars and restaurants and indoor operations across a number of industries.  It created a monitoring list that tracked six key factors regarding reopening, including positive test rates, hospital and ICU capacity, number of available ventilators and personal protective equipment available for hospitals, and cases per 100,000 people.

To allow a continued reopening without an accompanying surge in cases, effective August 31, 2020, California has a new, phased reopening that applies statewide called the Blueprint for a Safer Economy. Continue reading “California Announces New “Blueprint For A Safer Economy” That Includes Significant Changes to Reopening Guidance”