New York Department of Labor Publishes Standard and Model Plans for HERO Act’s Imminent Adoption Requirement

The HERO Act, signed into law on May 6, 2021, and amended on June 14, 2021, is legislation designed to create enforceable health and safety regulations aimed at preventing airborne infectious diseases in the workplace. The law applies to all New York employers, regardless of size, and includes a requirement that employers establish a joint labor-management workplace safety committee. The law also includes an anti-retaliation provision and provides for civil penalties and a private right of action.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

New York Enacts Amended HERO Act Requiring Employers to Implement Workplace Airborne Infectious Disease Exposure Prevention Plans

On May 6, 2021, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law “first in the nation” legislation designed to create enforceable health and safety regulations aimed at preventing airborne infectious diseases in the workplace. The New York Health and Essential Rights Act takes effect in stages and requires the New York State Department of Labor to develop and publish model airborne infectious disease exposure prevention standards that employers can choose to either adopt or use as a guide in developing their own airborne infectious disease exposure prevention plans.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

New Year, New Rules: Status of COVID-19 Leave Laws for New York Employers in 2021

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) partially sunset as of December 31, 2020. Employers are no longer required to provide FFCRA leave to employees. For New York employers, though, their responsibilities under Senate Bill 8091, which guarantees certain leave, benefits and job protections to employees affected by COVID-19, remain in full force.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

The State That Never Sleeps, Especially During a Pandemic: New York COVID-19 and Other Updates

In the midst of a second and serious wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, New York has been busy updating guidance, restrictions and other laws. While seemingly unrelated, each is a direct result of what we are experiencing in this new normal environment. They include travel advisories, New York Forward Phase IV regulations and amendments to the WARN Act.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

New York Governor Issues One More (and One Final?) COVID-Related Executive Order Tolling Statutes of Limitations

On October 4, 2020, New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo issued Executive Order 202.67, which further tolled New York statutes of limitations until November 3, 2020, and extends a toll first instituted by Executive Order 202.8 on March 20, 2020. Executive Order 202.67 is the latest order extending the initial toll of New York’s statutes of limitations that Governor Cuomo ordered at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Court Rules Telephonic Annual Meeting Appropriate During COVID-19 Pandemic Under New York Not-for-Profit Corporation Law

The New York Supreme Court recently ruled that under the COVID-19 emergency amendments to the New York Not-for-Profit Corporation Law (N-PCL), a homeowners’ association board of directors’ decision to not hold an in-person annual meeting, but instead use measures including a telephonic meeting, mail-in voting for the election of new directors and pre-meeting submission of proposed business, complied with HOA bylaws and the N-PCL.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

COVID-19 Telework May Trim Fund Managers’ NYC Biz Taxes

With COVID-19 continuing to spread through much of the U.S., working from home has become the preferred, if not required, form of work for many employers and their employees. Entering the pandemic’s sixth month, this new work-life arrangement shows no signs of stopping anytime soon.

Working from home may trigger a host of unforeseen state tax consequences for employers and employees alike,[1] particularly in the Northeastern U.S. where people frequently cross state lines to travel between their office and home.

One industry in particular has seen, and may continue to see, a substantial state tax benefit from remote working arrangements: hedge fund and private equity fund managers with offices located in New York City.

To read the full text of this article by Duane Morris attorneys Scott Gluck and Maximilian Viski-Hanka, originally published in Law360, please visit the firm website.