Two New Guidances from FDA for Investigational New Drug Applications and Clinical Trial Expectations for Drugs and Biological Products Proposed for Use Against COVID-19

On May 11, 2020, the FDA issued two new guidances for industry and investigators of drugs and biological products proposed for use against COVID-19. These two guidances, “COVID-19 Public Health Emergency: General Considerations for Pre-IND Meetings Requests for COVID-19 Related Drugs and Biological Products” and “COVID-19: Developing Drugs and Biological Products for Treatment of Prevention,” provide insight into the expectations of the FDA regarding new treatment drug development programs in the fight against COVID-19.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

Liability Protections Under Consideration for Businesses Set to Reopen During the COVID-19 Pandemic

With the Senate set to return from recess on Monday, liability protections related to the COVID-19 pandemic are anticipated to be a hot button issue. While state and local governments are seeking financial aid from the federal government to assist in their battle against the COVID-19 pandemic, relief packages may also include protection from future legal actions against businesses.

As stay-at-home restrictions are beginning to be lifted, and businesses are starting to reopen, there are concerns that employees and customers will file suit against businesses, claiming that they were infected with COVID-19 as a result of the businesses’ failure to take appropriate measures to protect them once reopening occurs. This fear is likely in response to lawsuits that have already arisen against businesses related to COVID-19. For instance, earlier this month, a Celebrity Cruises crewmember, who contracted COVID-19 while working on a Celebrity ship, filed a proposed class action alleging that the cruise company failed to take adequate measures to protect the employees on its ships.[1] The crewmember filed the proposed class action in a Florida federal court, claiming that the cruise company failed to follow safety precautions after receiving notice that COVID-19 was or was likely present on the ships, such as permitting crewmembers to continue to eat in a buffet setting, and mandating crewmembers’ participation in shipboard drills.[2] Continue reading “Liability Protections Under Consideration for Businesses Set to Reopen During the COVID-19 Pandemic”

HHS Offers Details on Liability Immunity of PREP Act Following Passage of CARES Act

The Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) has provided an omnibus advisory opinion in response to various requests for clarification of the scope of tort immunity provided by the declaration under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act (PREP Act). The PREP Act declaration provides immunity from tort liability for various persons, products and activities in response to COVID-19, as explained in our March 17, 2020, Alert. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) subsequently expanded these protections.

To read the full text of this Duane Morris Alert, please visit the firm website.

Personal Protective Devices Available Through 3D Printing Process

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the demand for personal protective equipment (PPE) has significantly outpaced the capabilities of the traditional supply chain. Gowns, gloves, facemasks, and face shields are valued commodities that even many healthcare providers cannot secure in this environment. While traditional supply and manufacturing chains struggle to keep up with production, industry leaders have turned to 3D printing, or additive manufacturing technology, to address this dire need. Unlike traditional manufacturing methods, companies with already established additive manufacturing technologies can more readily and efficiently adapt their productions to manufacture such PPE. 3D printing manufacturers may already have the powder or fabric necessary to manufacture PPE. They also have versatile printers. These companies simply need software and product design specifications, which allows them to begin production much more quickly than companies relying on traditional manufacturing methods that require additional raw materials and even machines and equipment.

For example, Superfeet, a shoe insert manufacturer, which typically uses 3D printing for manufacturing its products, was contacted about its ability to assist with a shortage of powered air purifying respirators (PAPR) hoods to hospitals in Washington state. The company had printers and fabric already. In just a few short days, Superfeet was making PPE.

To read the full text of the article by Duane Morris , visit the MD+DI website.