Tag Archives: nursing home

Government Cracks Down On Nursing Home Use of Social Media

On August 5, 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published a Survey and Certification Memorandum (Notice) urging State health departments to enforce violations by nursing homes in posting patient images on social media. This development was interesting given that the Office for Civil Rights (OCR), the enforcer of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy and Security Rules, presumably should already be cracking down on any such violations of resident rights as a violation of HIPAA. According to Modern Healthcare, increased instances of nursing home staff inappropriately posting resident pictures on social media may have sparked this pronouncement by CMS.

Specifically, CMS will more strictly enforce, through State agencies, corrective actions to ensure that employee postings of residents in a degrading manner do not occur in the nursing home setting. Interestingly, the Notice does not discuss nursing homes reporting such employee conduct to OCR, but does indicate that employees should report such postings on social media of residents as abuse “to at least one law enforcement agency.” Continue reading Government Cracks Down On Nursing Home Use of Social Media

CMS released its Focused Dementia Care Surveyor Worksheets

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released its Focused Dementia Care Surveyor Worksheets on November 27, 2015. The Worksheets were developed for a pilot project in 2014 as part of CMS’ continuing effort to reduce the use of antipsychotic medication. The Worksheets are to be used by surveyors in reviewing dementia care at post-acute care facilities. The Worksheets were released so that facilities can use these tools to assess their own practices in providing resident care.

The Worksheets contain specific topics for review, and state that failure of the facility to perform certain practices will result in a deficiency of F309. F309 addresses quality of care, and requires that each resident receive (and the facility provide) the necessary care and services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being, in accordance with the comprehensive assessment and plan of care.

Facilities that serve individuals with dementia should have policies and procedures based upon nationally-recognized dementia care guidelines, such as CMS’ Hand in Hand series, the OASIS program, the University of Iowa program, the VA Program (STAR), Johns Hopkins’ DICE program, Alzheimer’s Association materials, NHQCC or other QIO guidelines, Advancing Excellence medication management tools, or the AHCA toolkit.

The Worksheets also evaluate supervision, staff training, and Quality Assessment and Assurance, as well as the care provided to specific residents. All facilities that serve individuals with dementia should obtain and use the Worksheets to evaluate their own practices.

Antipsychotic Drug Use Can Lower Nursing Home’s Five-Star Rating

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is continuing its efforts to reduce the national prevalence of antipsychotic drug use in long-stay nursing home residents. Its initial goal of a 15.1% reduction in antipsychotic drug use was met, so CMS now seeks to reduce antipsychotic drugs by 25% by the end of 2015 and 30% by the end of 2016. The national average of antipsychotic drug prevalence was 19.8% in early 2014.

CMS has been publishing each facility’s antipsychotic drug use on the Nursing Home Compare web site. Now in 2015, as further incentive to nursing homes, CMS will use antipsychotic drug use as a factor in calculating each facility’s Five-Star Rating.  A low Five-Star Rating can have a direct impact on a facility’s census and profitability.

Nursing homes need to develop strategies to reduce antipsychotic drug use. They cannot depend upon physicians to change the drug orders; they need to partner with physicians to develop creative approaches for treatment. Each resident should be thoroughly evaluated to determine the root cause of behaviors that trigger the use of antipsychotic drugs. Frequently, the undesirable behaviors are caused by an unmet need. Once the need or cause is determined, individualized, person-centered approaches can be developed to prevent or respond to the behaviors. This is the beginning of a new year, now is the time to start some new interventions to reduce antipsychotic drug use and enhance your Five-Star Rating.

OIG’s 2012 Work Plan For Nursing Facilities: Same Fraud, Different Enforcement

Recently, the United States Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) published its Work Plan for fiscal year 2012 (“Work Plan”) and delineated focus points for nursing facilities and new enforcement in 2012. The Work Plan is not much different than previous work plans with the exception of increased areas of enforcement, as well as a few new areas to be looked at by OIG.

Continue reading OIG’s 2012 Work Plan For Nursing Facilities: Same Fraud, Different Enforcement