New Reporting Requirements for Philadelphia Health Care Facilities

By Erin M. Duffy and Samantha Dalmass

On June 9, 2021 Mayor Jim Kenney signed municipal legislation amending the Philadelphia Health Code to add a section establishing reporting and employment requirements related to changes in ownership or of the license holder of long-term care facilities and hospitals. Proposed in April by the Committee on Public Health and Human Services, Bill No. 210331 (the “Ordinance”) was passed by the Philadelphia City Council on May 27, 2021. The Ordinance imposes certain notification requirements for hospitals and long-term care facilities pursuant to a 5% or more change in ownership of the owner or operator of such institutions. The City of Philadelphia Ordinance requires hospitals and long-term care facilities to provide notices to the City of Philadelphia, as well as to facility employees prior to the effective date of a sale or other change in ownership interest. The ordinance also requires that certain documentary evidence of the transaction be posted the institution’s website. Following the initial posting of such notices, there are ongoing requirements for the owner or operator of a facility to update the information made available to its employees and the public on a weekly basis as well as additional notice requirements upon the effective date of the change. Continue reading “New Reporting Requirements for Philadelphia Health Care Facilities”

HHS Issues Proposed Changes to the HIPAA Privacy Rule

On December 10, 2020, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (“NPRM”) to modify the HIPAA Privacy Rule. HHS stated that the proposed modifications, which are being issued as part of HHS’s “Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care,” are aimed at removing barriers to coordinated care, strengthening individuals’ access to their own medical information, and reducing unnecessary administrative burdens. Proposed changes to the HIPAA Privacy Rule in the NPRM include: Continue reading “HHS Issues Proposed Changes to the HIPAA Privacy Rule”

Class Action ADA Lawsuit Filed Against Hospital – A Sign of More to Come?

Disability discrimination lawsuits against hospitals have become relatively common in recent years as former hospital employees allege that their former employers discriminated against them on the basis of various disabilities in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Other ADA lawsuits have been filed against hospitals and other healthcare providers, claiming that their websites or parking lots do not adequately accommodate those with disabilities. Yet others have been filed accusing hospitals of failing to accommodate deaf patients by not providing a live interpreter. But few, if any, major lawsuits had been brought against hospitals and healthcare providers alleging that the facilities themselves fail to accommodate patients with physical disabilities. That may have changed with a putative class action lawsuit filed in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania in late July, which may be the first of many cases to come.

View the full Alert on the Duane Morris LLP website.

Nursing Homes Ready For Emergency Preparedness Rules?

Neville M. Bilimoria
Neville M. Bilimoria

With all the regulatory changes facing nursing homes these days, it is no wonder most are behind in the world of compliance. It seems nursing homes are constantly berated with new regulations and more issues to deal with on a daily basis. The recent article in the May 22, 2017 edition of Modern Healthcare was, therefore, not a surprise: “Regulation: Nursing homes and hospice providers face looming emergency preparedness deadline.”

The article discusses the real November 15, 2017 deadline for nursing homes to comply with the emergency preparedness regulations promulgated by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) in September 2016. The article further discusses how most facilities are not close to complying by the November 15, 2017 deadline. The problem is that while nursing homes have historically had some emergency preparedness policies and procedures, the new CMS rules impose more robust policies, procedures, and mechanisms to be in place prior to November 15, 2017. That would require nursing homes to partner with local hospitals, police and fire departments to make sure their preparedness plans are up to date, robust, and systematically applied. The rules mandate, among other things, back-up generator contingencies, cybersecurity attack back up plans, and widespread training on a myriad of emergency preparedness policies and procedures that need to be developed by nursing homes. The rules even require disaster drills to be conducted by the nursing home in conjunction with local emergency response agencies.

Continue reading “Nursing Homes Ready For Emergency Preparedness Rules?”

SCOTUS Strikes Down Texas Statute in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt

In a 5-3 decision today, the Supreme Court of the United States in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt, No. 15-275, slip op. (June 27, 2016) reversed a decision of the Fifth Circuit and overturned as unconstitutional a Texas law that (1) required abortion providers to have “active admitting privileges” at a hospital within 30 miles of the location at which they provide abortions and (2) required abortion facilities to meet standards adopted for ambulatory surgery centers. The Court wrote that each of the requirements “places a substantial obstacle in the path of women seeking a previability abortion, each constitutes an undue burden on abortion access, and each violates the Federal Constitution.”  A team of Duane Morris attorneys, including Philip H. Lebowitz, Erin M. Duffy, Katharyn I. Christian McGee, Alison Taylor Rosenblum, and Erica Fruiterman, filed an amicus curiae brief on behalf of medical staff professionals in support of petitioners Whole Woman’s Health et al.  In its decision, the Supreme Court cited Duane Morris’ amicus brief, noting, “Other amicus briefs filed here set forth without dispute other common prerequisites to obtaining admitting privileges that have nothing to do with ability to perform medical procedures.”  The brief was one of only a handful of amici curiae briefs cited in the decision out of a total of 41 such briefs filed on behalf of petitioners.

 

ACOs Waking Up to the Value of Post-Acute Care Providers

Recently, the American Hospital Association published in its newletter Trendwatch a detailed 16 page article entitled “The Role of Post-Acute Care in New Care Delivery Models,” December 2015.   The article discusses what we have been trying to tell our post-acute care, especially nursing home clients, for years: become a valued partner of an Accountable Care Organization (“ACO”) and be ready to show your value to those ACOs, or continue to operate as you historically have at your own peril.

When ACOs first started, there was virtually no room or focus on long-term care providers being involved in an ACO. Some hospitals talked initially about home health care, but very little discussion was geared towards long-term care providers being in an ACO network because hospitals did not understand the long-term care environment. Continue reading “ACOs Waking Up to the Value of Post-Acute Care Providers”

Duane Morris Partner Patricia S. Hofstra to Speak on “Retail Clinics in Healthcare: Overcoming Complex Legal Challenges”

Duane Morris partner Patricia S. Hofstra will be speaking at the Strafford Live Webinar on “Retail Clinics in Healthcare: Overcoming Complex Legal Challenges” to be held on Thursday, March 10, 2016 from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. (Eastern time).  The webinar  will address “Complying with Corporate Practice of Medicine, Licensure, and Scope of Practice Laws; Navigating Emerging Relationships with Physicians, Hospitals and Payers.”

For more information, please see the event page on the Duane Morris website.

Health System Integration and Antitrust Laws on Collision Course

Health systems attempting to fulfill the mandate of integrating hospitals and physicians may find themselves accused of going too far.  Although the Affordable Care Act, shared savings, gainsharing and other alternative payment methodologies have made integration of physicians, hospitals and other providers an operational goal, success in reaching that goal may be challenged by private antitrust actions.

In a recent Florida federal court decision, the antitrust complaint of “several of Southern Brevard County’s physicians and physicians practice groups” was held to have stated a monopolization claim against Health First, Inc. and three of its wholly-owned subsidiaries —  an insurer, a hospital and a physician practice group.  Essentially, by fully integrating its business, and incentivizing in-network referrals and managed care pricing, Health First became vulnerable to claims of tying, exclusive dealing, price discrimination and monopolization.

Continue reading “Health System Integration and Antitrust Laws on Collision Course”

Duane Morris’ Michael E. Clark Quoted in Modern Healthcare

Duane Morris special counsel Michael E. Clark of the firm’s Houston office, is quoted in “AHA Lawsuit over ‘Two-Midnight’ Rule Called Uphill Battle,” which appeared in Modern Healthcare on April 15, 2014.

No matter how strong their legal arguments, hospitals will have a tough time convincing judges to overturn Medicare’s controversial new rules on classifying inpatients, some legal experts say.

Continue reading “Duane Morris’ Michael E. Clark Quoted in Modern Healthcare”

Hospital Employment of Physicians

Those of us who have been in the health care industry for awhile have seen hospital employment of physicians come and go several times. In my early years as a health care attorney, I was an in-house counsel in the hospital industry. I represented hospitals in the rush to jump on the band wagon of physician employment. I am now in the private practice of law and while I continue to represent hospitals, I also represent physicians and physician groups exploring various relationships with hospitals including employment.

Continue reading “Hospital Employment of Physicians”