Thankful for Technology

At times, it can seem like technology is bringing us down …

We frequently hear about: cyberbullying of teens; online intellectual property infringement; various forms of identity theft, hacking, privacy and security violations, and cyber crime; cyber warfare; illegal sales of munitions and slaves and the organization of terrorist activities on the Dark Web; political email scandals; potential foreign Internet influence over US political elections; and the list goes on and on.

But during this Thanksgiving and holiday season, not only can we be thankful for our family and friends, we also can be grateful for the many benefits of technology.

The Many Blessings of Modern Technology

When we cannot be with our family and friends, because of technology, we can see them and talk to them in real time on our computers, laptops, tablets, and our phones. Without leaving our homes, we can make online purchases at sites like Amazon for holiday gifts, and for the numerous other aspects of our lives.

Technology also allows us to work remotely, either full-time, part-time, or just once in a while — which is a blessing indeed. Not only that, technology makes us much more efficient and productive in our work.

Entertainment never has been better, thanks to technology. We can watch movies and our favorite shows and we can listen to our music anytime and anywhere.

Transportation likewise has improved. We can just pull out our phones and at a moment’s notice, and an Uber or a Lyft will show up to take us to our desired destinations.

And, of course, sites such as Airbnb and VRBO have expanded our lodging options far beyond traditional hotels and motels when we travel.

Review sites like Yelp afford the opportunity for us to review online evaluations before we utilize a service or purchase certain goods.

Last but not least in this very short list, the power of the internet is demonstrated by the wealth of information at our fingertips. No longer do we need to try to look something up in a cumbersome and dated encyclopedia. Instead, just “Google it” or go to Wikipedia.

So chin up folks — we can be grateful for technology.

Eric Sinrod (@EricSinrod on Twitter) is a partner in the San Francisco office of Duane Morris LLP, where he focuses on litigation matters of various types, including information technology and intellectual property disputes. You can read his professional biography here. To receive a weekly email link to Mr. Sinrod’s columns, please email him at ejsinrod@duanemorris.com with Subscribe in the Subject line. This column is prepared and published for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. The views expressed in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the author’s law firm or its individual partners.