Tag Archives: market access

Vietnam Logistics Law – New Decree 163 – Nothing to See Here?

Despite media reports to the contrary, Vietnam’s new logistics regulation does not further open up the market to foreign investment but newly requires compliance with e-commerce regulations.

On 20 February 2018, Government Decree No. 163/2017/ND-CP on logistics services will replace the old Decree 140/2007/ND-CP. Many foreign investors had hoped for further clarification and market access in the logistics sector. The new Decree 163 does not grant new rights to foreign investors, at least on paper, and may even introduce new uncertainties in practice. While the most interesting new provision could turn out to affect the digitalization of logistics processes.

Issued in 2007, just when Vietnam acceded to the WTO, Decree 140 is ancient for Vietnamese law standards. The law has moved on since then, as Vietnam opened most service sectors to foreign investors, including many (but not all) business activities in the logistics sector. A few points on Decree 163 are outlined below.

I. “Logistics” redefined

Foreign investors (and Vietnamese businesses seeking foreign investment) must closely review each business activity they plan to conduct in Vietnam to see if foreign ownership limitations and other conditions apply. The old Decree 140 defined “logistics” with reference to Article 233 of the Commercial Law 2005. Article 3 of the new Decree 163 defines and regulates the following “logistics services”:

Logistics services under Article 3 of Decree 163

  1. Container handling services, except for provision of such services at airports.
  2. Container warehousing services as part of maritime transport support services.
  3. Warehousing services as part of support services for all modes of transport.
  4. Delivery services.
  5. Freight transport agency services.
  6. Customs brokerage services (including customs clearance services).
  7. Other services including the following activities: bill of lading inspection, freight brokerage services, cargo inspection, sampling and weighing services; goods receipt and acceptance services; and transport documentation preparation services.
  8. Wholesaling support services and retailing support services including activities being management of goods in storage, collection, sorting and classification of goods, and goods delivery.
  9. Freight transport services as part of maritime transport services.
  10. Freight transport services as part of inland waterway transport services.
  11. Freight transport services as part of rail transport services.
  12. Freight transport services as part of road transport services.
  13. Air transport services.
  14. Multimodal transport services.
  15. Technical analysis and testing services.
  16. Other transport support services.
  17. Other services provided by logistics service providers and as agreed with their clients in accordance with the basic principles of the Commercial Law.

“Delivery services” and “other transport services” are not further defined in Article 3. The lawmakers probably intended that one refer to the Vietnam Standard Industrial Classification System (VSIC), which is comparable to the United Nation’s Central Product Classification (CPC) codes used in Vietnam’s WTO Service Sector Commitments (WTOSSC) . For example, “delivery services” under VSIC 5230 include delivery of mail and parcels not covered by “freight transportation services.” VSIC 5320 is similar to WTOSSC’s “courier services” (CPC 7512), which includes “express delivery services.” There is no foreign ownership limit in Decree 163 for “delivery services,” nor for “courier services” under the WTOSSC – that’s good news for foreign courier services providers.

II. No changes to foreign ownership limitations (FOL)

WTOSSC and Decree 140 already defined FOL and their respective schedules. Decree 163 does not change anything. Decree 163 addresses FOL of various freight related services but is silent on passenger transportation services.

The below chart summarizes the main foreign ownership caps in the logistics sector. It is a simplified chart, and additional conditions apply to those business lines. Further conditions apply to foreign investors. For example, maritime freight transport companies with up to 49% foreign ownership may register ships in Vietnam and fly the Vietnamese flag, but only up to one third of the crew members may be non-Vietnamese; the captain and the first officer must be Vietnamese citizens. Like other conditions in Decree 163, this is nothing new and was already set forth in the WTOSSC.

Vietnam: Foreign Ownership Limitations (FOL) in the Logistics Sector

WTOSSC Decree 163
CPC Service Description FOL FOL
742 Storage and Warehouse 100%
748 Freight transport agency (incl. freight forwarding services) 100%
749 Bill auditing; freight brokerage; freight inspection, weighing and sampling; freight receiving and acceptance; transportation document preparation on behalf of cargo owners 99% 99%
7211 Maritime transport (Passengers; less cabotage) 49%
7212 (a) Maritime transport (Freight; less cabotage) – joint-venture fleet flying Vietnamese flag 49% 49%
7212 (b) Maritime transport (Freight; less cabotage) – foreign fleet 100% 100%
7221 Internal waterways transport (Passengers) 49%
7222 Internal waterways transport (Freight) 49% 49%
7111 Rail transport (Passengers) Unbound
7112 Rail transport (Freight) 49%
7121 + 7122 Road transport (Passengers) 49%
7123 Road transport (Freight) 51% 51%
No CPC Custom clearance 99%
No CPC Container station and depot 100%
7411 Container handling (except at airports) 50% 50%
621, 61111, 6113, 6121, 622, 631 + 632 Distribution (import/export, commission agents, wholesale, retail) 100%

III. New e-commerce provision – digitalization of logistics services

One thing that is new in Decree 163 is its express requirement to comply with Vietnam’s e-commerce regulations. Article 4.2 provides that a logistics business conducting part of or its entire business electronically over the Internet, mobile or other “open networks” must comply with e-commerce regulations. Vietnam’s main e-commerce regulation is Decree 52/2013/ND-CP. Decree 52 requires e-commerce service providers to either notify or register with the Ministry of Industry and Trade. E-commerce providers must also protect personal information and consumer interest in accordance with Decree 52 and other laws and regulations. Arguably, though, these e-commerce requirements were already applicable to logistics services that conducted e-commerce activities before Decree 163.

Article 4.2 is very broad and could obviously apply to any business communications over e-mail, messaging apps, web-conferencing, company websites, and social networking sites – just to name few. The question is whether Article 4.2 will also apply to new internal, digital enterprise processes, such as digital supply chain and smart warehousing technologies that utilize “open networks.” Vietnamese law does not define “open networks,” and various literature about the topic is inconclusive as to what it actually means. For instance, one tech article concludes that today “open network” means “user choice” – which is not very helpful from a legal perspective. If IT specialists disagree on the meaning of “open networks,” the various Vietnamese authorities involved in regulating and licensing logistics activities are likely to be confused as well and could interpret Article 4.2 in various, uncertain ways.

Bottom line: The new Decree 163 does not expand market access rights of foreign investors in Vietnam’s logistics sector, but it introduces an explicit requirement to comply with e-commerce regulations.

For more information , please contact Manfred Otto at MOtto@duanemorris.com or any other lawyer you are regularly communicating with at Duane Morris.

Disclaimer: This post has been prepared and published for informational purposes only and is not offered, nor should be construed, as legal advice. Each case should be analyzed individually with the support of competent legal counsel. For more information, please see the firm’s full disclaimer.

Lawyer in Vietnam Dr. Oliver Massmann Public Mergers and Acquisitions: Market Analysis Overview

Largest / most noteworthy public M&A transactions in the past 12 months

Oil gas & Chemicals

In May 2017, Earth Chemical bought 100% stake in A My Gia Joint Stock Company at about USD79.2 million.


In July 2017, Vietnam International Joint Stock Commercial Bank bought 100% business of Commonwealth Bank of Australia (Ho Chi Minh Branch).



  • Thai group Singha bought 25% and 33% stake in Masan Consumer Holdings and Masan Brewery respectively at a total of USD1.1 billion.
  • VinGroup bought Maximark at an undisclosed value.
  • In April 2017, Shinhan Vietnam Bank bought the retail business of ANZ at an undisclosed value.
  • In May 2017, Bien Hoa Sugar Company and Thanh Thanh Cong Tay Ninh Sugar Company bought 100% charter capital of HAGL Sugar at about USD58.52 million.


  • In December 2016, Fraser & Neave (a Singaporean beverage company) bought 5.4% of Vinamilk’s shares at USD500 million.
  • In late 2016, Deasang Corp bought 99.99% stake in Duc Viet Food Joint Stock Company.
  • In November 2016, Kido Corporation bought 65% stake in Tuong An Vegetable Oil Company at about USD44.52.
  • In late March 2017, CJ Cheiljedang Corporation bought 20% stake in Saigon Trading Corporation at USD8.2 million, bringing its total ownership in Cau Tre Export Products Processing Joint Stock Company to 71.6%.
  • In May 2017, Kido Corporation bought 27% stake in Vietnam Vegetable Oil Industry Corporation, bringing its total ownership in the company to 51%.

Real estate

  • In June 2016, Mapletree Investments acquired Kumho Asiana Plaza project through the joint venture between Kumho Industrial and Asiana Airlines at USD215 million.
  • In July 2016, Mitsubishi bought the Manor Central Park project from Bitexco Group at an undisclosed deal value.
  • Also in July 2016, VinaCapital bought International Centre Building from Keppel Land Ltd. At USD13.8 million.
  • In September 2016, CapitalLand Vietnam bought Ho Chi Minh Cau Kho Land Plot project from River View Company Limited at USD51.9 million.
  • In the first quarter of 2017, Sulyna Hospitality bought 70% stake in a 4-start resort in Phu Quoc from Berjaya Land at USD14.65 million.
  • In the first quarter of 2017, An Gia Investment Corporation and its partner Creed Group bought 5 apartment blocks of La Casa Project of Van Phat Hung Corporation at about USD40 million.
  • In the same period, CapitaLand announced the purchase of 90% stake in CapitaLand Thanh Nien.


  • In June 2016, FWD insurance company, a branch of Pacific Century, started the process of acquiring Great Eastern Vietnam after receiving the licence for this acquisition.
  • In June 2016, New Life RE bought Duxton Hotel from Low Keng Huat at USD49.2 million.
  • In April 2017, Aviva Insurance Corporation bought 50% stake of VietinBank Aviva Joint Venture Company from Vietnam Joint Stock Commercial Bank for Industry and Trade.

The major trends in the structuring of public M&A transactions

In Vietnam, M&A transactions usually take the form of either share or asset acquisitions, with share acquisition transactions outnumbering asset acquisition transactions.

Share acquisitions by foreign purchasers are commonly structured as offshore direct investments. The new investor can:

  • Acquire shares or capital contributions from an existing shareholder in the target (for example, a joint stock company, limited liability company, and so on).
  • Subscribe for newly issued shares of the target (for a joint stock company).
  • Make further capital contributions to the target (for a limited liability company).

In the case of an asset deal, a foreign purchaser must generally establish a new subsidiary in Vietnam.

In addition, M&A transactions can also take the form of a merger. One or more companies of the same type can be merged into another company by transferring all assets, rights, obligations and interests to the merged company, terminating the existence of the merging company.

The 2014 Enterprise Law sets out the types of business structuring that can be used by investors as a result of M&A transactions. In addition, the 2014 Investment Law is the first law that regulates M&A transactions and clearly provides that such transactions do not require an investment registration certificate. Now, the foreign investors must seek approval from the local Department of Planning and Investment of the transaction if the:

  • Target company operates in conditional business sectors applicable for foreign investors.
  • Investment leading to foreign ownership of the target company is 51% or more (in particular, from below 51% to more than 51% and from 51% to above 51%).

In other cases, the target company only needs to register a change of membership/shareholding at the Business Registration Division. This change has ended years of uncertainty and frustration faced by foreign investors seeking entry into the Vietnam market or expansion through M&A transactions.

The level/extent of private equity-backed bids in the past 12 months

Investment in the form of M&A transactions is still the most popular form compared with private equity investment. In recent months, private equity funds have been following the securities market in Vietnam, especially companies carrying out value chain operations. Consumer goods and infrastructure are the sectors that attract the most attention. However, due to limited publicly available information, it is not possible to fully assess the level of private equity-backed bids.

The approach of the competition regulator(s) in the past 12 months

The Vietnam Competition Authority under the Ministry of Industry and Trade (VCA) must be notified of the transaction if participating companies have a combined market share in the relevant market of 30% up to 50%. The VCA will then examine whether the calculation of the combined market share is correct and whether the transaction is prohibited (that is, whether the combined market share exceeds 50%, except in certain cases). The transaction can be conducted when the VCA issues a written confirmation that the transaction is not prohibited under competition law.

For more information on the VCA, see www.vca.gov.vn/Default.aspx?lg=2.

Main factors affecting the public M&A market over the next 12 months

The country’s deeper and wider integration into the world’s economy is offering new opportunities for M&A activities.

Another factor includes the high pressure faced by the government to privatise state-owned enterprises to meet requirements under signed trade pacts, especially the EU – Vietnam Free Trade Agreement, which is expected to come into force in 2019.

Encouraging signs for foreign investment include:

  • Reformed policies to allow wider access to foreign investors.
  • Formation of the ASEAN Economic Community at the end of 2015.
  • The conclusion of free trade agreements (FTAs).
  • Vietnam’s super rich population is growing faster than anywhere else and is on track to continue leading the growth in the next decade.
  • Equitization of state-owned enterprises will speed up.

The introduction of the new Investment Law, Enterprise Law and other laws and policies are creating an improved legal environment for investment and trade in general, and the M&A market in particular. However, the following factors also affect M&A transactions:

  • Divergent interpretations and implementations by local licensing authorities of international treaties such as Vietnam’s WTO Commitments.
  • Different licensing procedures applied to different types of transactions (for example, for foreign invested companies and domestic companies, public companies and private companies, and for buying state-owned shares or private shares).

Although legal and governance barriers, along with macro instability and the lack of market transparency are still the greatest concerns for investors, M&A deals in Vietnam are still expected to be one of the key, effective channels for market entry.

The major expected trends in the Vietnam M&A market include:

  • Bank restructurings.
  • Acquisitions and anti-acquisitions, particularly in the real estate sector.
  • Growing Japanese and Thai investment in Vietnam through M&A transactions.
  • Reform of SoEs.


Please do contact the author Dr. Oliver Massmann under omassmann@duanemorris.com if you have any questions on the above. Dr. Oliver Massmann is the General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam.




On 2nd December 2015, after nearly 3 years with 14 rounds of negotiations, President Donald Tusk, President Jean-Claude Juncker and Prime Minister of Viet Nam Nguyễn Tấn Dũng announced the conclusion of the negotiations of the EU-Vietnam Free Trade Agreement (EVFTA). Both parties are undertaking the necessary steps to finalise the ratification process for the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) to enter into force in 2018.

EVFTA is considered one of the most comprehensive and ambitious trade and investment agreements that the EU has ever concluded with a developing country. It is the second agreement in the Association of South East Nations (ASEAN) region after Singapore and it will intensify the bilateral relations between Vietnam and the EU. Vietnam will have access to a potential market of 500 million people and a total Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of USD 15 000 billion (accounting for 22% of global GDP). The other way around, exporters and investors from the EU now have further opportunities to access one of the fastest-growing countries of more than 90 million people in the region.

The real wages of skilled laborers may increase by up to 12% while real salary of common workers may rise by 13%. The macro economy will be stable and inflation rate controlled. Vietnam’s business activities will be booming in the next few years once the EVFTA officially comes into force and Government’s policies, as well as institutional reforms, start showing their positive effects.

Moreover, Vietnam’s GDP is expected to increase by 0.5% annually and increase in exports of 4-6% per year. If this trend continues until 2020, Vietnam’s exports to the EU will increase by USD 16 billion. Until 2025, the EVFTA is estimated to generate an additional 7-8% of GDP above the trend growth rate.


Nearly all customs duties – over 99% of the tariff lines will be eliminated. The small remaining number is partially liberalised through duty-free quotas. As Vietnam is a developing country, it will liberalise 65% of the value of EU exports to Vietnam, representing around half of the tariff lines, at entry into force and the remaining duties will be eliminated over the next ten years. For some products, Vietnamese duties will be eliminated over a sevenyear period such as motorcycles with engines larger than 1500cc, car parts and about half of EU pharmaceutical exports. The market will be opened for most of EU food products, i.e. wine, spirits and frozen pork meat after seven years. For dairy products, after a maximum of five years. This is an unprecedented far-reaching tariff elimination for a country like Vietnam, proving its targets for deeper integration and trading relations with the EU.

From the EU’s side, the EU agreed to eliminate duties for 84% of the tariff lines for goods imported from Vietnam immediately at the entry into force of the FTA. Within 7 years from the effective date of the FTA, there will be more than 99% of the tariff lines being eliminated for Vietnam. The EU will eliminate duties for some sensitive products in the textile and footwear sector over a 5-7-year period, with a double transformation rule (instead of a strict yarn-forward rule as in the TPP) and will allow Vietnam to import fabrics from South Korea as an exception to the general rule. The EU also offers access to some Vietnamese sensitive agricultural products via duty-free quotas (rice, canned tuna, surimi, sweet corn, sugar products, etc.). Vietnamese exports of textile, clothing and footwear to the EU are expected to more than double by 2020 as a result of the EVFTA.

We note that, in the region, besides Vietnam, Singapore also concluded an FTA with the EU in 2014. However, this does not affect the competitiveness of Vietnam in trading with the EU. This is due to the fact that Vietnam mainly exports textiles, footwear, agricultural products, etc. while Singapore’s main exports are machines, chemical products and transport equipment. Moreover, while the EU is accelerating procedures to negotiate FTAs with different countries in the ASEAN region, Vietnam should take advantage of this golden time before FTAs with others in the region are concluded and to become a regional hub.


Although Vietnam’s World Trade Organisation(WTO) commitments are used as a basis for thes ervices commitments, Vietnam has not only opened additional (sub)sectors for EU service providers but also commits deeper than in the WTO, offering the EU the best possible access to Vietnam’s market. (Sub)sectors that are not committed under the WTO but under which Vietnam makes commitments are, for example: interdisciplinary research and development (R&D) services, nursing services, physiotherapists and para-medical personnel, packaging services, trade fairs and exhibitions services and building-cleaning services. Moreover, it is noteworthy that the EVFTA contains a MFN clause that allows one party to grant the other party the best treatment that the former is negotiating with other partners under another framework.

We set out below certain Vietnam’s commitments in key sectors with reference to its commitment to the WTO.

Distribution sector

The WTO requires an Economic Needs Test (ENT) for the establishment of outlets for retail services (beyond the first one). The EVFTA requires the same but adds cases for ENT exemption and timeline for ENT abolishment after five years.

Distribution of cigarettes and cigars, publications, precious metals and stones, pharmaceutical products and drugs, explosives, processed oil and crude oil by foreign investors are still prohibited.

wtO eVFtA




The establishment of outlets for retail services (beyond the first one) shall be allowed on the basis of an Economic Needs Test (ENT)


In case of establishing an outlet less than 500m2 within the area planned for trading activities and already completed construction of infrastructure, ENT is not required.


5 years from the date of entry into force of the Agreement, the requirement of the ENT will be abolished.

Power/ energy

wto eVFtA







Commitments are made in 3 sub-sectors: (i) Production of electricity; transmission and distribution of electricity on own account; (ii) Manufacture of gas; distribution of gaseous fuels through mains on own account; and (iii) Production of steam and hot water; distribution of steam and hot water on own account.

Maritime transport

Sub-sectors wto eVFtA


Maritime transport services


Mode 3 Market Access (MA): joint venture with maximum 49% foreign ownership



Mode 3 MA: joint venture with maximum 70% foreign ownership


internal waterways transport

Passenger transport Freight transport


Mode 1: No commitment Mode 3: joint venture with

maximum 49% foreign ownership


Mode 1: No restriction Mode 3: joint venture with

maximum 51% foreign ownership

Securities services

wto eVFtA


Commitments on 6 sub-sectors

Mode 3: foreign securities service suppliers are permitted to establish representative offices and joint ventures with maximum foreign ownership of 49%.

After 5 years from the date of accession, securities service suppliers with 100% foreign-invested capital shall be permitted.

Same commitments in 6 sub-sectors

Commitments on 2 additional services: Provision and transfer of financial data processing; and credit reference and analysis.

Mode 3: Same as the WTO

Telecommunication Services

Non facilities-based services: WTO/ASEAN Framework Agreement on Services (AFAS): maximum 65% foreign ownership forever but in the EVFTA after 5 years, this could be 75%.

Other services – Virtual Private Network (VPN): maximum 70% foreign ownership forever but in the EVFTA after 5 years, this could be 75%.


 Vietnam is a country of changes and currently offers increasing opportunities for foreign businesses. The underlying strength of the economy is reflected in, among others, controlled macroeconomic indicators, strong productivity gains and extensive integration into the regional and global economy. It is now time for foreign investors to start their business plans and grasp the upcoming clear opportunities.

Please do not hesitate to contact Oliver Massmann under omassmann@duanemorris.com if you have any questions or want to know more details on the above. Oliver Massmann is the General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC.

Thank you!





Japan Releases TPP Details – Vietnam to Abolish Tariffs and Economic Needs Test

Besides abolishing tariffs and providing for investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), some of Vietnam’s highlights under the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade pact include removing the dreaded economic needs test (ENT), raising foreign ownership caps in restricted sectors such as telecoms, and improving custom procedures.

Although the actual text of the TPP has not been published (because the final version is not available yet), the Japanese government has recently disclosed key elements of the pact. Interestingly, the government refers to the agreement that was reached on 5 October 2015 in Atlanta as a “broad agreement,” implying that it may not be the final version including all the details yet. The following information that may not have been as broadly reported in other international news is based on Japanese government sources, including the following presentation (in Japanese):


1. Abolishing tariffs for 95% of all traded items

The TPP has a very high liberalization rate. Tariffs for many agricultural products and 99.9% of industrial products (e.g., cars, auto parts, electronics, chemicals) will be abolished. Tariffs for many items will be lifted immediately once the TPP comes into effect (e.g., agricultural products such as grapes, kiwifruits, herring, prawns, crab, yellowfin tuna, suckling pig, red beans, eggs.). On the other hand, tariffs for some items will remain and will end in the 3rd to 16th year of the pact (e.g., orange juice, cigarettes, wine, plywood).

For specific items member countries can set import quotas (e.g., rice in Japan), and countries can implement temporary emergency measures (so-called “safeguards”) to protect domestic production.

2. General trade and investment facilitation

The TPP provides common rules to facilitate doing business, competition and investing in other member countries. Some general rules include:

  • 6-hour rule for express custom clearance (standard clearance within 48 hours).
  • Stricter rules on intellectual property (counterfeits) and prohibition on royalty rate restrictions.
  • General prohibition on demanding technology transfer, local contents, or access to source code from an investor.
  • Visa waivers for short-term business travelers and their families (except for United States and Singapore).
  • Opening domestic public procurement to member state bidders.
  • Prohibition on levying import duties on digital contents and general rules on e-commerce.
  • Support for small and medium-sized enterprises to benefit from TPP.
  • Environmental and over-fishing protection measures.

3. Examples of rules specifically applicable to Vietnam

(a) Vietnam to scrap the economic needs test

Vietnam commits to abolish the ENT after a period of 5 years from the issuing date of the TPP agreement. (At least 6 member countries respresenting at least 85% of the GDP of all initial members must ratify the pact within 2 years before it can be issued.) Foreign retailers are very interested in this market with an emerging middle class and surging disposable income.

The ENT currently requires foreign investors in the retail sector (including supermarkets, malls, and convenience stores) to undergo licensing procedures for each new outlet they intend to open beyond the first one. This has long been seen as a barrier to market access.

(b) Vietnam to ease foreign investment caps on telecoms, local banks, and entertainment services

Currently limited to a maximum of 65% foreign ownership, under the TPP foreign investors will be allowed to own up to 75% stakes in telecommunication businesses in Vietnam. Foreign ownership caps are also slated to be raised for local banks and entertainment services, such as theaters and music clubs.

(c) Prohibition of export duties and custom procedure transparency

Vietnam will generally not be allowed to impose new export tariffs or maintain the same on items such as on mineral resources. Vietnam will also be obliged to use best efforts to announce new custom regulations at least 60 days before they come into effect and to respond to reasonable questions from member states within 60 days as well.

In addition, the TPP generally provides for product-specific rules of origin applicable to all TPP member countries. Producers, exporters and importers will be allowed to issue certificates of origin themselves. E-custom filing is encouraged.

4. Investor-state dispute settlement mechanism

Investors from member states will be able to bring legal action against the Vietnamese government using international arbitration tribunals outside of Vietnam.

The ICSID, UNCITRAL, ICC or other arbitration rules can be applied, but the TPP’s ISDS provisions set forth a few basic rules:

  • Before the arbitration tribunal can rule on the merits of a case, it must first decide on whether it has jurisdiction and respond to the responding party’s objections.
  • Unlike in private arbitration where secrecy is considered a plus, all ISDS arbitral decisions must generally be published.
  • Statutes of limitations for bringing ISDS actions.

However, apparently, the TPP cannot prohibit countries from implementing restrictive measures based on justifiable public policy grounds. In the past, Vietnamese courts have often declined the recognition and enforcement of foreign arbitral awards on the ground of contradicting ‘fundamental principles of Vietnamese law’ which is similar to the public policy argument. Accordingly, how frequently TPP ISDS awards against Vietnam will be enforced in Vietnam in the future is still uncertain.


Again, the above information is not based on the actual text of the TPP but secondary governmental sources. A review of the actual legal text may reveal discrepancies. We will keep you updated on interesting developments and look forward to receiving your comments.

Please contact  Manfred Otto for more information or japanese@duanemorris.com inquiries in Japanese.

Disclaimer: This post has been prepared and published for informational purposes only and is not offered, nor should be construed, as legal advice. Each case should be analyzed individually with the support of competent legal counsel. For more information, please see the firm’s full disclaimer.


Vietnam Opens Logistics Sector to Foreign Investors . . .

By Manfred Otto, Duane Morris Vietnam LLC


As of 11 January 2014, wholly foreign-invested enterprises (“FIE”) are permitted to provide almost all types of logistic services in Vietnam subject to proper licensing. The problem is that important aspects of logistics are not open to wholly-owned foreign companies: container handling services and road transport services still require joint ventures with Vietnamese partners.

Continue reading Vietnam Opens Logistics Sector to Foreign Investors . . .

ベトナムが物流部門を外国投資家に対して開放. . .


オットー マンフレッド 倉雄(著)
小林 裕(訳)


この点について、国連の重要商品、サービスの分類コード(CPCコード)に従うWTOサービス部門コミットメントに基づき、外国企業による市場への参入は保証されるはずであるが、「物流部門」についてベトナムのWTOコミットメントは定義付けをしていない。ただし、次の「すべての物流手段の補助サービス(Sector H)」は現在FIEにも開放されている。 Continue reading ベトナムが物流部門を外国投資家に対して開放. . .