Category Archives: Investment in Vietnam

ICO/STO: Is It Legal For Vietnamese To Participate?

The short answer is that ICO/STOs themselves are not regulated yet in Vietnam (as in most other countries). That doesn’t mean that every initial coin offering (ICO), security token offering (STO), private sale, presale, crowdsale, token generating event, airdrop or whatnot and underlying blockchain token is legal. Many laws and regulations could apply and render participating legally impossible in practice.

On the other hand, the question in Vietnam is always whether the laws are implemented and enforced. If they are enforced, what are the potential sanctions and other risks?

Illegal payment method

“Issuing, providing, and using” bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies as non-cash payment method is illegal in Vietnam. That’s the only thing that is relatively clear under the law (Decree 101/2012/ND-CP and the Criminal Code). The State Bank of Vietnam (SBV), which is the monetary authority here, has published an opinion on 30 October 2017 supporting this view. The administrative fines can be up to VND 500,000,000 (about USD 22,000) for unlicensed operation.

By implication:

  • Issuing a payment token is illegal – Are you generating a utility token that can be used to pay for accessing the system?
  • Providing payment tokens is illegal – Airdrop anyone? Or are you selling cryptos?
  • Paying with cryptocurrency is illegal
    • Are you paying for ICO tokens with ether, bitcoin, or Vietnam dong?
    • Will the platform reward users who have contributed to the ecosystem with tokens?
    • Are you paying with cryptos to receive fiat currency or other cryptos (i.e., exchange or trading)?

While the above could be narrowly interpreted to apply only to cryptocurrencies as payment method, what about other characteristics and functionalities of blockchain tokens? Vietnam has no guidance yet on how to differentiate what a token represents or is used for. This might change soon.

What is a blockchain token under the law?

Reportedly, the Ministry of Justice has submitted a proposal for crypto-assets to the Prime Minister of Vietnam for approval. The details are not public yet. The plan is to recognize crypto-assets as “property” (or “asset” as the Vietnamese term “tài sản” is sometimes translated) under the Civil Code. What kind of property? Either securities or non-securities.

If the proposal is approved, the implications of being recognized as property under the law could be vast. Potentially, non-security crypto-assets would be tradeable as commodities on exchanges. Security tokens would have to comply with Vietnam’s Securities Law, which is currently being revised. Compliant ICO/STO could become reality.

From a government perspective, the main issues are how to protect investors and prevent uncontrolled capital outflows. Recognizing crypto-assets as property under the law will strengthen the legal basis to go after fraudulent ICOs and tax evaders.

Cross-border issues

The legal framework for outbound investments from Vietnam is extremely restrictive. Investing in tokens from an ICO/STO launched outside of Vietnam could be subject to capital controls, foreign exchange regulations, and offshore investment regulations. Vietnamese individuals and organizations must first apply to register their offshore investment with the authorities in Vietnam. Not many receive the necessary offshore investment registration certificate. The legality of providing tokens cross-border from outside Vietnam to Vietnam is questionable as well.

If the token is deemed a security, most individuals in Vietnam would be precluded from purchasing them legally. Individuals are generally not allowed to invest in securities outside of Vietnam. The only exception: employees of foreign companies may participate in bonuses share schemes (e.g., employee stock options). Securities companies, insurance companies, banks and a few other organizations may invest in foreign securities, but only in those securities approved by the SBV.

In addition, all profits derived from offshore investment activities must be repatriated within 6 month of tax finalization, unless they are used to expand the offshore investment (which requires another registration procedure in Vietnam).

Outlook

A legal way for conducting an ICO/STO could be boon for Vietnamese start-ups and small and medium-sized enterprises who have difficulties in accessing traditional funding channels. If capital cannot be raised in Vietnam in a legal way, such activities will stay underground. Entrepreneurs will seek other venues. However, with overwhelming enthusiasm in Vietnam for blockchain technology and cryptos, hopes are high that the country will adopt a workable legal framework that will promote compliant ICOs and STOs.

For more information, please contact Manfred Otto at MOtto@duanemorris.com or any other lawyer at Duane Morris.

The firm’s disclaimer applies to this post.

 

New Cyber-security draft decree – better but the show goes on

In October, we reported on a first draft decree to implement the Cyber-security Law and noted many concerns about its overtly stringent terms and, in particular, the threat it caused to development of a thriving e-commerce/ Industry 4.0 landscape.  Since then, the business community, among others, have been vocal on the shortcomings of the draft and offered up many comments and suggestions to address concerns.  With the release of a new draft early Novembers, it appears that the Ministry of Public Security (MPS), the decree’s authors, have listened.

 

The first clue is in the length of the new draft: cut dramatically in size from 66 clauses to just 30, it necessarily doesn’t cover as much ground as the first draft.  But the devil is always in the detail and, although the new draft is considerably less complex, particularly when it comes to issues affecting e-commerce, a close look reveals there are still areas worthy of further advocacy.

 

The question we have been asked most frequently is whether the Cyber-security Law itself, and its impending decree, govern every company on earth accessible over the Internet to Vietnam-based users. Taking the language of the “old” draft at face value, the answer was a clear affirmative, resulting in consequences both unreasonable and unnecessary to impose as well as impossible to enforce in practice, notably an obligation to localize data and establish commercial presences.  The new draft takes a much more balanced and practical approach and suggests that a far more limited number of companies will be subject to these requirements in practice. In particular, these key obligations look set to only apply to companies (whether local or international) which meet all of the following conditions:

 

  • providing one or more of specific services to users in Vietnam, including: (i) telecommunications, (ii) internet storage, (iii) internet data sharing, (iv) web hosting services, (v) e-commerce, (vi) online payment, (vii) payment intermediary, (viii) transportation connection service (think Uber), (ix) social network and social media, (x) e-gaming, and (xi) electronic mail;

 

  • collecting, exploiting, analyzing, and processing the data of Vietnamese users (see below for what amounts to “data”);

 

  • allowing its users to conduct activities prohibited by Articles 8.1 and 8.2 of the Cyber-security Law (i.e. – key Internet-based wrongdoings such as libel, anti-government propaganda, financial fraud etc.); and

 

  • committing wrongdoings covered by Article 8.4.a of the Law [this appears to be a typo as there is no such clause in the Law] or Article 26.2.b of the Law (this obliges companies to prevent sharing of and delete certain kinds of “wrongful” information within 24 hours of receipt of a request from the Vietnamese authorities).

 

While criterion (1) is still very broad, it at least removes from the scope any and all companies that had service-offering websites accessible by Internet from Vietnam (such as our hypothetical Irish bank in our October blog post). Still, many other tech companies such as Amazon, Agoda, Google, Facebook etc. would fall squarely within one or more categories covered there. However, this is just the top of a funnel: even is a company fits within criterion 1 (and therefore almost certainly criterion 2) they will not automatically be required to localize data or establish commercial presences in Vietnam.  Following approaches of other jurisdictions to assess and handle based on risk and conduct, such companies will only be required to take such steps if they fail to comply with what the Cyber-security Law expects them to do (read: cooperate with the government). It is good for business as now they can decide to cooperate and avoid strict monitoring rules.

 

Apart from this new and more tolerant “co-operate-or-comply” philosophy, the data which companies may need to store in Vietnam is also watered down slightly. The list now “only” covers information which can help identify users (i.e. – names, nationalities, occupations, residency, contact information, ID/passport numbers, credit card numbers, health records, biometrics) and other user-created data (i.e. data which users choose to upload, friend lists, groups users join or interact with).  Data such as “philosophical belief” or “political views” are no longer covered in the new draft decree.

 

As ever, there is some bad with the good.  The new draft seems to double down on granting power to the MPS to proactively examine the information systems of companies in Vietnam where it suspects wrongdoing.  There is little or no due process involved in such cases.

 

In conclusion, the MPS has clearly taken on board much of the advice and criticism received following the broad and unworkable first draft decree and this is good news.  Whether this will ultimately be reflected in the final decree however still remains to be seen.

 

For more information about the Cyber-security Law in Vietnam, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com, Le Hau at HNLe@duanemorris.com. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.

Draft Decree to implement Cybersecurity Law doesn’t dampen concerns

A draft Decree to implement Vietnam’s controversial Cybersecurity Law does little to assuage fears that all online commercial activity will be within its scope, mandating physical presence in Vietnam, expensive, cumbersome data localization and even a new permit.

 

Last June, Vietnam’s National Assembly overwhelmingly passed the Cybersecurity Law and it will take effect on 1 January 2019.  Despite assurances from the Ministry of Public Security (MPS) – author of the Law – that the Law is aimed at ensuring online security and protecting critical information infrastructure, its wide and unclear language caused concern for online commercial service providers whose activities are captured by its scope and worried about the cost and other implications of compliance, particularly with respect to commercial presence and data localization obligations.

 

Since the Law’s approval, many have been waiting to see the government Decree that will effectively interpret and implement the Law.  The Decree will determine whether and how the Law will truly impact online commercial activity.  Will it be business as usual for online commerce, as promised by a government that publicly embraces Industry 4.0, or will data hosting services and compliance officers be working overtime?

 

During the first half of October, two different versions of the draft Decree came into the public sphere. The latest draft, dated 11 October 2018, contains 66 clauses, touching on almost every single issue and clause of the Law itself.  While draft Decrees can and do change, the signs are that restrictions and headaches will remain for companies with online business activities.

 

Take, for example, the question of who will need to establish a commercial presence in Vietnam.  Under the Law, companies providing any kind of services related to or via telecommunication networks or the Internet, and which collect, process, analyze, or exploit the personal data of users in Vietnam (regardless of nationality) will need to establish a representative office or a branch in Vietnam (Article 26.3).  Many wondered whether this was intended to apply to every single company falling within the very broad criteria.  For example, would a bank in Ireland offering online banking services used by a handful of Vietnam-based users be subject to this requirement?  It would seem unnecessary and wholly impractical to say so.  The draft Decree however seems to support such a view.  According to Article 60 of the draft Decree, all companies providing “services through the Internet” will be subject to the requirement to establish a commercial presence in Vietnam (in the form of a branch, a representative office or other type of “establishment”).  “Services through the Internet” is understood very broadly by the draft Decree to include anyone providing: (1) internet connection services, (2) internet access services, (3) data storage, (4) social network, (5) over the top services (think, Netflix), (6) e-commerce, (7) banking and finance, (8) messaging and teleconference services, (9) live chat services, (10) search engines, (11) games, films, music.

 

While this clarifies and elaborates the Law’s general drafting, the long list is troubling as it clearly covers not only tech giants such as Facebook, Twitter, and Google, but also companies simply having auxiliary Internet-based services or the Irish bank in our example.

 

In a similar vein, the draft Decree sheds more light on the data localization rules but does little to assuage fears that the regulations are for the sake of regulation rather than based on risk analysis and purpose-driven policy.  According to Article 61 of the draft Decree, certain personal data will need to be stored in Vietnam by companies for the lifetime of the business, while certain other personal data need only be stored for three years from the date of creation. At any time, the MPS may request companies to provide copies of such data.  On the plus side, there is no indication that companies cannot transfer data abroad, provided they also maintain it in Vietnam. The list of personal data that companies need to store in Vietnam is extensive, including typical information such names, addresses and photos but also extending widely to include biometrics, financial records, health records, political views, and philosophical beliefs (items that need to be stored for the lifetime of the business).  Further information looks worrisome from a civil liberties perspective, including chat logs, and search histories, which will need to be stored for at least three years from creation.

 

Aside from the regulatory compliance burden, these requirements may put companies into difficult positions if they face conflict complying with their own local regulations prohibiting the transfer of data to foreign governments (take, for example, the US CLOUD Act).

 

A brand new element introduced by the draft Decree is an obligation on companies subject to the Law to obtain a special permit from the MPS prior to providing services in Vietnam.  No such requirement is included in the Law itself and this calls into question the legality of the MPS ‘creating’ this new permit obligation.  It’s cause for serious concern if this remains in the final Decree, not least of all because there is no guidance or explanation on procedures, information or timeline required to obtain such a permit.  It is also entirely unclear if this new permit obligation will apply retrospectively to companies already doing business in Vietnam over the Internet.  Any way you look at it, this is harmful for the business environment in Vietnam and contrary to the message delivered by the MPS and government in consultations and meetings about the Law.

 

The only good news in the draft Decree seems to be the decision that companies will have a full year to comply with the Law, meaning, in effect, that even though the Law takes effect on 1 January 2019, companies won’t need to be compliance until January 2020.

 

Time will tell what ultimately stays in and out of the Decree.  The draft is expected to be finalized and formally adopted by the government in the next weeks.

 

For more information about the Cybersecurity Law in Vietnam, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com, Le Hau at HNLe@duanemorris.com. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.

Vietnam Blockchain Law – Dawn of a New Era (13 Sep 2018)

Vietnam is in the process of preparing a regulatory framework for bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Rumor has it that the first draft will be released shortly, possibly this weekend. Major players are positioning themselves to enter one of the biggest markets for cryptos in Asia. Let’s take a look at the current situation and at what could potentially be – the dawn of a new era.

Plan to regulate

Last year in August the Prime Minister of Vietnam issued a decision to create a legal framework for virtual assets. The country’s Ministry of Justice is in charge of coordinating with other relevant authorities. I have met with the Minister to comment on international experiences. The plan is to have a cryptocurrency bill by the end of the year. Not much time, but they have a dedicated team working on this.

Regulatory sandbox

An official of the State Bank of Vietnam (SBV) recently announced that it will likely have a regulatory sandbox for fintech, also within 2018. Together with one of our blockchain clients, we had advocated for a blockchain sandbox as a first step for a year and a half. So, the outlook is generally positive. Although, we don’t know the details of the planned regulations yet, and delays are common in Vietnam.

Current obstacles

As it currently stands, Vietnam’s laws are hostile to cryptocurrencies. Issuing, providing and using bitcoin or other virtual currencies as payment method is prohibited in Vietnam, because cryptocurrencies are not listed in an SBV decree as one of the permitted non-cash payment methods. Vietnam also has strict capital controls and foreign exchange regulations. Offshore investments by Vietnam residents require licensing in Vietnam.

ICOs and STOs are not regulated, although, the State Securities Commission notified securities companies, broker-dealers etc. to not get involved, pending new regulations. Significant fraud is being reported in connection with fake ICOs. Likewise, the SBV has directed financial institutions and intermediaries under its purview not to deal with any virtual currencies and related companies.

Data protection

Data privacy and other issues are not yet in the mainstream, but Vietnam has passed a new Cybersecurity Law that will come into effect in January 2019. It requires server localization and commercial presences for IT services provided in Vietnam.

The upside: R&D hub

Despite the difficult legal landscape, many in the industry say that Vietnam is great for blockchain technology R&D. Vietnam has many talented engineers eager to learn and strong tax incentives for high-tech companies. Intel, Samsung and others have major production hubs here.

Outlook

Vietnam has the potential to become the next blockchain hub. A number of larger blockchain R&D companies and projects have already sprung up here. The State is welcoming high-tech and is eager to be prepared for the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Telegram groups on blockchain topics are active, and international projects are visiting to pitch on a daily basis. A conducive, practical legal framework for crypto- assets could further ignite the boom.

Get involved

Vietnam’s ministries and other law-drafting bodies are often soliciting opinions from business and other stakeholders on new draft legislation. This is a great way to be involved in shaping upcoming laws. We expect that this will be true for the draft crypto-asset regulations as well, but time is very limited. Stakeholders should get ready to submit their comments on short notice – possibly within a few days.

We can help you understand the implications of upcoming regulations. We would be happy to collaborate and prepare comments to be submitted to the relevant authorities. We can assist in Vietnamese, English, Japanese, French and other languages.

For more information, please contact Manfred Otto at MOtto@duanemorris.com or any other lawyer at Duane Morris.

The firm’s disclaimer applies to this post.

 

Solar project COD extension for Ninh Thuan province finally confirmed

Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc signed Resolution 115/NQ-CP on 31 August 2018 to confirm some special policies to support Ninh Thuan province (“Resolution 115”). Pursuant to Article 1.1.e of the Resolution 115, the Prime Minister  confirmed that the commercial operation date (COD) deadline (previously 30 June 2019) for solar projects in Ninh Thuan province to enjoy the 9.35 US cents feed in tariff has been extended to the end of 2020.  This extension applies to those solar energy projects approved in the relevant Master Plan (approx. 2000MW).  Resolution 115 took effect on 31 August 2018 and lays to rest the badly kept secret that Ninh Thuan, a literal hot spot for solar projects, will enjoy more favorable terms than projects in other locations which remain bound to the 30 June 2019 COD deadline.   Clear and definitive statements as to what will happen after 30 June 2019 for projects in other locations is now desperately required.  Our view and intel is that no-one else should bank on extensions and should develop strategies now to mitigate risks of missing the 30 June 2019 date (e.g. – look to be an early mover in the hotly-anticipated DPPA (direct power purchase) market).

For more information about renewable energy projects in Vietnam, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com or any of the lawyers in our office listing. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.

新規PPP関連法が立てうる、ベトナムのインフラ開発への道筋

著者:Giles T. Cooper

翻訳:志澤政彦(Masahiko Shizawa)

原文:https://blogs.duanemorris.com/vietnam/2018/06/19/will-a-new-ppp-law-pave-the-way-for-vietnams-infrastructure/

インフラというボトルネックに、ベトナムの急成長が直面している。政府には、今まさに必要な道路、鉄道、トンネルに資金を投下できるほどの予算がない。そこで専門家が目を向け始めているのは、民間セクターである。

この制約がある以上、非国家セクターの資金を輸送インフラ開発のため継続的に活用することが今すぐ必要となる。アジア開発銀行(ADB)によれば、2015年から2020年までの間のインフラへの投資のため、ベトナムは最大170億米ドルを必要とするだろうとのことである。

近年、ベトナム政府は官民連携(PPP)プログラムの下で投資プロジェクトに透明性を与えるよう進めてきた。PPPは、政府機関と民間投資家が協同してなす投資の一形態であり、インフラの建設、修復、運営、並びに管理、及び公共サービスの提供のために行われる。政府はPPPにより、開発目標達成のため民間セクターの効率性と専門性を活用することができる。

そうはいっても、そうしたプロジェクトの持続的な実施を阻む欠点や限界があり、現状で名乗りを上げるのに投資家は慎重を期している。

投資を勧奨する政令が提出されてきてはいる。しかし、その条件は魅力的とはいえず、そのようなプロジェクトに必要な柔軟性がないとの批判もある。PPP投資活動の主な規制は以前、PPP投資に関する政令15/2015/ND-CP号及び入札法の実施指針である政令30/2015/ND-CP号であった。

この国は、1990年から2016年までに総額162憶米ドルにも及ぶ84件のPPPプロジェクトを実施してきている。うち79%はエネルギー関連のものであった。 一方、2011年のPPPパイロットプログラムが制定されて以来、この法的枠組みを利用した新規PPPプロジェクトは一切登録されていない。

政府は最近、政令15/2015を改正し、ベトナムにおけるPPPプロジェクトの分野、投資条件、手続を特定した政令63/2018(政令63)を発行した。この新たな政令により、PPPプロジェクトにおける投資家の資本比率が20%にまで引き上げられる。政令63は2018年の6月に施行された。

これで十分といえるか

BOT(Build-Operate-Transfer)方式とBT(Build-Transfer)方式のプロジェクトに対する調査・監査結果によれば、そのほとんどにおいて、投資家選定の際の入札が限定され、低い競争性と透明性の欠如を招いたとのことである。また、プロジェクトの通知は未だにオープンな方法で実施されていない。

同時に、プロジェクト実施の管理は非効率的であり、建設作業の低質化等の様々な問題を引き起こしている。

これらの問題に対応して投資を促進するため、ベトナム国会は政府に、上記のような難点や法的制限を取り払うようなPPP関連法を作るよう求めた。

PPP関連法の成功に必要な3要素

  • 明確なリスク共有メカニズム

当局は未だ、政府がデベロッパーのため一定の最低収益を保証し、それに至らない場合に補填するようなリスク共有メカニズムを、明確に打ち出してきてはいない。この点は、プロジェクトがしばしば重大なリスクを伴うインフラの場合には特に重要である。規制の明確さにより投資家の信頼を得られるのではないだろうか。

現状のモデルでは、ほとんどのリスクを民間セクターに転嫁してしまっている。民間の投資家や事業者の誘致には、透明性のある政策枠組みと公平なリスク分配が鍵である。同様に、明確に定義されたプロジェクトの射程と期待できる金銭的な利益の適切な保証を伴った魅力的な取引のストラクチャーによって、PPPへの参加が奨励されるものと思われる。

  • 為替レート保証

長期的な融資は外貨によってなされるものの、ベトナムのインフラプロジェクトの収益は現地通貨ベトナムドンによる。これだと、プロジェクトの収益性に負の影響をもたらす。新たなPPP関連法を成功に導くには、長期的な建設プロジェクトの中で投資家が同等の交換レートを確保できるよう、政府による兌換保証メカニズムを盛り込む改善が必要となろう。

海外への外貨送金の制限も縮小される必要があろう。

こうした障害や通貨変動のリスクは、投資家の信頼に大きな影響を与える。これらを取り除くことが、この国の継続的前進に必要な種類のプロジェクト誘致に重要であろう。

  • 金銭的インセンティブ

典型的な長期投資であるインフラプロジェクトには、投資家に巨大な建築に必要な20年から30年もの間の関与をさせるため、対価としての追加のインセンティブや収益の保証が必要となろう。

このリスクを相殺するために、政府は開発の波及的効果の一部を投資家に報いることを考えてもよいだろう。インセンティブがあれば、収益が交通の流れや将来の予測不可能な状況に依存するといった、インフラ開発に内在的な不確実性を減らすことができるだろう。

要するに、やる気のある投資家の誘致にベトナムが必要なのは、信頼できる政策及び規制、加えて投資家の信頼を得られるようなPPPに特化した政府部門といった、透明性、公平性、予測可能性を確保できる枠組みである。

ライフサイクルコスト、安全性、レジリエンス(強靭性)、そして環境への影響といったその他の要素も、考慮される必要がある。

ベトナムのインフラ開発への需要は揺るぐまい。しかし、現状の立法状況が実現可能または収益性のあるPPPプロジェクトに繋がるとはいえない。PPP関連法の上述のような点をクリアにすれば、透明性を向上し、この国に目を向けている事業体のリスクを減らし、もって状況の改善が見込めるだろう。

ベトナム投資に関する情報については、GTCooper@duanemorris.comよりGiles弁護士または当事務所の弁護士一覧の弁護士にお問い合わせください。Giles はドウェイン・モリス・ベトナム法律事務所の共同代表であり、ドウェイン・モリス・ホーチミン支所の支所代表です。

Why you shouldn’t miss out on Vietnam’s industrial property market

Though comparatively young among its regional peers, Vietnam’s economy is turning up some exciting areas of opportunity. One of the most promising is the industrial property market, comprising industrial land, ready-built factories, warehouses and other logistics properties.

 

Slowly but surely, the country is moving from a labour-intensive to a capital-intensive economy, and over the next few years we will continue to see a shift towards the more value-added sector.

 

This means that the industrial sector will begin to incorporate more sophisticated requirements, demanding a higher level of expertise and technical equipment. At the moment, industrial parks remain sparse and there is no concerted effort to gather industries on a regional level.

 

However, Vietnam’s manufacturing and processing sector accounted for over 40 percent of the country’s foreign direct investment (FDI) last year, which surged to a record high of US$36 billion overall. This trend looks set to continue.

 

Get in on industry

 

Currently, the city of Hai Phong and province of Bac Ninh are the two localities boasting the highest number of industrial parks in the country. They are also the biggest draws for industrial investment in the northern economic region.

 

France’s FM Logistic, a leading warehouse supplier, recently launched a 5,000 sq.m logistics warehouse in Bac Ninh while purchasing an additional 50,000 sq.m in the north to build the first European-standard storage centre in Vietnam.

 

Other areas around the country are showing similar signs of strong development and investors would be wise to get in early.

 

In fact, the country’s largest supplier of industrial property, the BW Industrial Development JSC, debuted in the southern province of Binh Duong earlier this year. BW is a joint-venture between US private equity fund Warburg Pincus and Vietnam’s Investment and Industrial Development Corporation (Becamex IDC), with investment of over US$200 million.

 

Betting on the country’s booming manufacturing sector and rising domestic consumption, the company has bought land for eight projects in five localities around Vietnam, with a focus on developing institutional-grade logistics and industrial properties.

 

A well-connected hub

 

Among several notable advantages increasing Vietnam’s attractiveness to industrial investors, the country’s proximity to some of the world’s major sea trading routes offers huge opportunities to develop maritime transport, particularly for logistics services.

 

The country’s border with China makes it a promising option for manufacturers looking at alternative locations in Southeast Asia while operating costs in China continue to head upwards.

 

Additionally, the nation’s household income is likely to increase. According to recent research, Vietnam is expected to enjoy the strongest growth in the middle-income population bracket, with a Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 19 percent from 2018-2020, and an increase of 14 percent from the previous decade.

 

A young population coupled with growth in average income will boost purchasing power and help the country retain its spot as a top investment destination in Southeast Asia.

 

The fruits of free trade

 

Vietnam’s industrial real estate sector is also expected to get a helping hand once the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) comes into effect.

 

The passage of the deal has been smooth so far, and players both at home and abroad are already considering ways in which they can benefit from each other’s markets. Tariff cuts and streamlined regulations will precipitate a surge in investment, and a big slice will go into the industrial sector.

 

Acknowledging the oncoming wave of interest, the Prime Minister approved spending of up to US$921 million on infrastructure development around economic zones and industrial parks by 2020. This heavy investment has been earmarked for roads, drainage and water waste treatment facilities, as well as power infrastructure for industrial parks and clusters, hi-tech parks and hi-tech agricultural zones.

 

Major cities are also eyeing increased industrial attraction, especially from abroad. Under the development plan for Hanoi, the city will have nine more industrial parks on a total area of 2,360 hectares by 2020, an increase of 132 percent against current supply.

 

Easing the entry of foreign players to such parks would help in boosting occupancy. It remains to be seen whether the pledged cash will complete the connection of factories to road networks, as well as promote the growth of residential and commercial areas around the parks. If the strong demand is anything to go by, these requirements are likely to be met soon.

 

For these reasons, Vietnam is becoming more appealing to foreign manufacturers, their associated suppliers and supporting industries. Investor interest in the industrial market is on the up, in industrial zones as well as in income-producing industrial assets, build-to-suit opportunities and logistics-based warehousing.

 

Huge opportunities exist in Vietnam for both existing players and new manufacturing firms to snap up significant market share and get in on the ground floor. This area is certainly one to keep an eye on.

 

For more information about Vietnam’s industrial sector, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com or any of the lawyers in our office listing. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.

Location, location, location – 5 areas to watch in Vietnam

With the second fastest growing economy in the world after China, Vietnam offers investors an almost overwhelming range of ways to get in on its continuing success story.

 

From energy to real estate, transport to tourism, a multitude of areas are experiencing growth and attracting domestic and foreign investment. The push to ease regulations is set to continue, and the government is working to ensure an evermore fertile business climate. But with so many options, where is a good place to start?

 

Here are five spots currently generating some real excitement:

 

  1. Soc Trang

 

The Mekong Delta province of Soc Trang recently held an investment promotion conference and, with the backing of the Prime Minister, managed to rally investment pledges totalling nearly US$5.4 billion. The 47 projects are mainly focused on clean power generation, high-tech agriculture and tourism services.

 

With work already underway to reform and streamline administrative procedures, a new injection of cash could inspire even more growth over the coming years.

 

During the conference, the PM set out an aggressive development strategy for the province, underlining his vision that the coming decade would see Soc Trang expand its economy to achieve middle-income status.

 

Specifically, the province was urged to set its sights on high-tech agriculture adapted to climate change, clean seafood production and processing targeting high-value markets and eco-tourism linked with ‘smart’ agricultural models. To achieve this kind of sustainable development, provincial authorities will need to invest in human resources and education. Co-operative models between farmers, investors, banks and distributors will help the development of value chains and quality standards for agricultural products.

 

  1. Ninh Thuan

 

For those with eyes on the renewable energy sector, the province of Ninh Thuan is looking like a hot prospect. Construction on the country’s biggest solar power plant, with a capacity of 168 MWp and total investment of roughly US$194 million, commenced in the southern province early in June.

 

The plant is a project by Singapore’s Sunseap Group – a large provider of clean energy solutions – and is slated to cover an area of 186 hectares. Once operational in June 2019, the plant is expected to supply over 200 million kWh of electricity to the national grid annually.

 

Sunseap is not the only player taking advantage of the province’s valuable location and abundance of sunlight, with four other plants kicking of construction this year in Ninh Thuan. With backing from provincial leaders, the province aims to become a renewable energy hub, with the generation of 2,000 MW of solar power by 2020.

 

So far, the province has 15 wind power and 27 solar power projects, with designed capacity of nearly 800 MW and 1,808 MW, respectively.

 

  1. Ho Chi Minh City

 

With properties priced at a fraction of those in neighbouring Singapore and Thailand, Vietnam is drawing a number of real estate investors and becoming a popular destination for foreign buyers.

 

Interest in Ho Chi Minh City, in particular, has been growing among foreign buyers with a number of projects already for sale and some approaching completion in the next one to two years. Given the political stability of the government, some investors see Vietnam as having the possibility to grow like China.

 

Home prices in Vietnam have been rising over recent years, making a modest increase last year on the back of 6.8 per cent economic growth and rapid increase in direct foreign investments.

 

  1. Coastal hot spots

 

The hotel and hospitality sector is experiencing a resurgence in Vietnam, with many properties reporting strong occupancy rates and a large number of new operators entering the market, especially in coastal areas such as Da Nang and Nha Trang.

 

These sites were already known as popular destinations for both domestic and foreign tourists, with the number of international guests visiting the country reaching over 13 million last year. In the first four months of 2018, more than 5.5 million international guests visited Vietnam, an increase of 29.5 percent over the same period last year. As interest continues to mount, so too do opportunities for investors in the hospitality sector.

 

Thanks to the strong development of tourism infrastructure and improvements in accommodation, cities like Da Nang and Nha Trang now offer a wide selection of hotels, luxury resorts and beach villas to suit a range of budgets and preferences.

 

Condotels are a growing trend in this sector, and several developers have adopted this model as a method of refinancing. Experts forecast that up to 18,000 condotel units will be added to the market in the next two years in key tourism destinations, accounting for 60% of the total new supply.

 

With major groups such as Vingroup, Sungroup, FLC, Muong Thanh and Empire, as well as well-known international brands snapping up segments of Vietnam’s hospitality market, this area will be one to watch in the coming years.

 

  1. Quang Binh

 

The central province of Quang Binh has drawn up a list of 48 projects to be completed in the 2018-2020 period, with total expected value of over US$2.2 billion.

 

The projects are expected to cover more than 8,000ha of land, with a focus on tourism, trade and services, industry, and agriculture, as well as education and health care.

 

Of the projects, 14 are in tourism, including coastal and ecological tourism and resort complexes. These are considered high-value projects that will spur local job creation, boost the budget and foster tourism development in the province.

 

For more information about investing in Vietnam, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com or any of the lawyers in our office listing. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.

ベトナム:インフラ開発のジレンマにグリーンボンドは効くか著者:Giles T. Cooper

翻訳:志澤政彦(Masahiko Shizawa)

原文:https://blogs.duanemorris.com/vietnam/2018/05/15/are-green-bonds-the-answer-to-vietnams-infrastructure-dilemma/ 

ベトナムを含む東南アジア諸国では、急成長とともに安定した資金源の確保が困難になってきた。

このことは、インフラ事業において顕著である。アジア開発銀行(ADB)の報告書によると、経済成長に伴い、2030年までにこの地域では2.8兆米ドルに相当する道路、橋梁、鉄道が必要になるとされている。

不安定さを増す政治情勢に直面している東南アジア諸国は、この先数年のインフラ開発の資金調達の選択肢としてより安全なものに目を向けている。「一帯一路」政策の下ですでに1兆米ドルものプロジェクトを支援してきた中国への過剰依存は、国内的解決策を経済が志向するにつれ、その規模が縮小されていくものであろう。従前に表明した境界線を踏み越えようとする中国の計画への恐怖は、資金の不正流用及び失敗したプロジェクトという具体的教訓と相まって、この地域周辺の国々に「一帯一路」の活用の再考を迫ってきた。

南シナ海の領域問題をめぐる政治的緊張及び増加傾向にある国際的な保護主義を前に、ベトナムのような国々は将来的な資金調達を自前で行う途を探る方向でいる。この地域全般で国家予算への負担は増加傾向にあり、この先数年で強く求められる成長のため投下すべき他の資金元を探そうとしている。一つの提案は、「グリーンボンド」の発行促進である。

「グリーンボンド」について知らなければならないこと

グリーンボンドは債券の一つであるが、発行者によって調達された資金は「グリーン」なプロジェクト、つまり、環境に配慮し、気候への懸念を考慮に入れたものに割り当てられる。グリーンボンドの発行が特に利益になるセクターは、再生可能エネルギー、インフラ、および建設業界である。

道路、橋梁、トンネル、そして鉄道の建設には、地域的及び全国的な気候に多大な負担をかけてしまう。そのため、環境フットプリントの低減を志向するプロジェクトの優先度は最も高い。

環境に配慮したプロジェクトに資金調達を集中させることに加えて、グリーンボンドは発行者の持続可能な開発への取り組みの深さを強調する意義もある。さらに、発行者はグリーン・ベンチャーにのみ投資をする特定のグループのグローバル投資家にアクセスできるようになる。国外のプレーヤーによるグリーンな投資への注目が高まっている中、資本調達のコスト削減にも貢献しうる。

ベトナムにとって意味するものとは

ドイツの開発機構であるGIZによれば、現在の炭素依存的成長からより持続可能な道筋へと移行し、その約束草案(Intended Nationally Determined Contribution、INC)に向けた行動をとるため、ベトナムは2020年までにおよそ307億米ドルを必要としている。

グリーンな成長のための資金のうち30%程度は国家予算、すなわち中央と各省の予算及び政府開発援助、からの拠出が見込まれているが、残りは民間セクターから供給されることとなるとみられる。

ベトナム政府が2011年から2020年の期間について承認したベトナム・グリーン成長戦略(Vietnam Green Growth Strategy, VGGS)の下では、資本市場がその目標達成のカギとなるだろう。グリーンボンドが死活的な役割を果たすのは、まさにこの点においてである。グリーンなプロジェクトや事業体のため特別に資金調達を行い、グリーンな商品のデリバティブの流通の素地を作り、さらに民間セクターの投資を持続可能な開発のため活用することになる。

国外からの関心としては、ベトナムのグリーンボンドの発行により、持続可能な開発、再生可能エネルギー、そして環境に配慮した成長を志向している国際投資家の誘致が期待されている。世界中の投資家が、気候変動の課題やエネルギーの移行につき、前にも増して注視している。環境問題を考慮に入れた投資ツール、特に開発途上国におけるものについて要求する投資家は、増加の一途を辿っている。

この地域で、ベトナムが持続可能な資金調達の見通しを見据えている唯一の国というわけではない。アセアン・グリーンボンド基準(ASEAN Green Bonds Standards、AGBS)が2017年11月に開発・実行され、アセアンでのグリーンボンドの発行に共通の基準が制定された。マレーシア、シンガポール、インドネシアの会社は、すでにアセアン・グリーンボンドと称された債券を発行している。

これらのグリーンボンドの発行によって調達された資金は、再生可能エネルギー、廃棄物処理、グリーンな建築物やインフラといった、持続可能性の要件を満たしたプロジェクトに配分され、さらに統合、連帯、アセアン全体の成長といった共通の目標に貢献するものである。何よりも、地域のリーダーたちは将来世代の犠牲のもとに成長は成り立たないことに気づいてきている。AGBSのような新たな取り組みが、環境に配慮した投資への資源の分配を促進するだろう。

成長不全を来しているグリーンな成長

2020年までに達成されるべき指標の一つは、グリーンボンド市場を、現在およそ90兆米ドルのグローバル債券市場の少なくとも1%にまで拡大することである。これを現実のものとするため、ソブリン債発行者は断固たる決断をする必要がある。

流動性の欠如、債券の構造の限定的な多様性、及び確実に収益の見込めるプロジェクトの定期的で大きな流れの不在といったものが、未だにアジアの現地通貨によるグリーンボンド市場の特徴である。

加えて、社会的責任を果たそうとしている投資家からの恒常的な要求はまだ限定的であり、この市場の成長の可能性を阻んでいる。

そうはいっても、ソブリン債発行者が環境を整備し、強力な枠組みが適用される限り、現地通貨でのグリーンボンド市場の成長の見込みは大きい。制約となりうるのは、確実に収益の見込めるグリーンな投資の数と大きさであろう。

もしベトナムが「グリーンボンド」の動きを十全に活用しようとするなら、上述したような方法での資金の注入が解決策を示してくれるだろう。それは、インフラ事業における資金調達の穴を埋め、より速い拡張に向けた基礎を固め、そして、これまで長い間痛めつけてきた環境には休息をもたらすものであるはずだ。

ベトナムのグリーンボンドに関する情報については、GTCooper@duanemorris.comよりGiles弁護士または当事務所の弁護士一覧の弁護士にお問い合わせください。Giles はドウェイン・モリス・ベトナム法律事務所の共同代表であり、ドウェイン・モリス・ホーチミン支所の支所代表です。

Vietnam – Regulatory Framework for Fintech and Blockchain Applications Announced

In its 5th session that closed on 15 June 2018, Vietnam’s 14th National Assembly passed 7 bills, including the controversial Cybersecurity Law. When the laws are revised, it is game on for law firms, but crucial is  action before the laws are passed.

Vietnam’s bureaucrats who draft the laws are open to exchanging information with experts from the business community. Last week, I talked with the Minster of Justice and other officials in preparation for the coming legal framework for fintech, blockchain, cryptocurrencies, and ICOs. Ministry of Justice officials announced that new legislation on virtual assets is planned within the year. Likewise, the State Bank of Vietnam is preparing a fintech “regulatory sandbox” – an environment where generally strict banking laws and other compliance requirements are eased for start-ups and new R&D projects to conduct proof-of-concept work. The Ministry of Science and Technology and other authorities are also working hard on related regulations in their respective fields.

Vietnam is beyond the point of “if” and “when” to regulate blockchain technology and applications – it has entered the “how” phase. Balancing the Cybersecurity Law and other national security measures with the opportunity to become a leading hub of the 4th Industrial Revolution might not be easy, but while legislation is pending, businesses can play a part in shaping Vietnam’s blockchain law.

For more information, please contact Manfred Otto at  MOtto@duanemorris.com or any other lawyer you are regularly communicating with at Duane Morris.