VIETNAM INVESTMENT REVIEW – INTERVIEW WITH LAWYER IN VIETNAM DR. OLIVER MASSMANN – ANTI-CORRUPTION ACTION PLAN – NEW LAW – WHAT YOU MUST KNOW:

1. It’s been observed that corruption in the non-state sector “has been growing rampantly and with complexity, especially in the areas of loaning, bidding, contracting, and in unofficial costs like gifts, tours, or job generation”. Will this law prevent or stop these various modes of corruption?

OM: Whether the law can prevent or stop these various modes of corruption depends on how well the law is enforced. Even if the law is written perfectly, without effective enforcement of said laws, they will only remain meaningless words on paper. Therefore, whether a law has a preventative or deterrent effect depends on how well the law is enforced. However it must be stated clearly that it is not possible for a law to stop all acts that it forbids – that is not possible in any country, for any law.
“Modes of corruptions” mentioned above can be classified into three categories: activities within one non-state actor, activities between two or more non-state actors, and activities between non-state actors and state actors.

Corruption in the areas of bidding, lending, contracting occur between non-state actors or between non-state and state actors. The regulation of commercial activities between non-state actors should be left to the realm of civil and contract law, and potentially criminal law for very serious offences to define what is legal and what is not, rather than corruption law, as these transactions are conducted purely in the private sector.

As for corruption between a non-state and state actor, including official costs, it is more efficient and realistic to target the corruption within the state actor rather than the non-state actor. Corruption in this situation can only happen if the state actor is susceptible and willing to receiving bribes, embezzlement or can be easily “bought”. Anti-corruption law should ensure that state actors are deterred from receiving bribes and unofficial costs, and criminal law should ensure the punishment of non-state actors for carrying out such activities. On top of that, private companies are profit-driven. No business would like to increase their costs unless absolutely necessary. Unfortunately without such unofficial costs, the private businesses are unlikely to be able to get anything done at all, as the authorities and state actors may purposefully hinder or create difficulties for the non-state actors. Thus, many non-state actors, especially SMEs, must make the sacrifice of engaging in corruption and bearing the costs in order to keep their businesses going. The prevention of such various modes of corruption must begin with the state sector.

2. The law also states that government officials cannot consult individuals and organizations in both state and non-state sectors in tasks that are related to state secrets, secret work, and work in which they have the authorization in or have part of the authorization in (Article 20)
Will this create difficulty in how businesses function well without government experts’ advice? The law forbids consultation but does not imply to forbid meetings or restrict communications. Will this be a loophole?

OM: It is reasonable to forbid government officials to consult other individuals and organizations in the non-state sector on information related to state secrets, secret work and work in which they have the authorization in or have part of the authorization in, as this may affect national security and public order. As for consultation with state actors, it should be clear what purpose of the consultation is, the position and security clearance of both parties sharing and receiving the information, and whether the consultation is necessary.
However, in order for this provision to be effective, there must be a clear definition as to what constitutes “state secret” or “secret work”, to avoid abuse of the law such as state actors unreasonably withholding information from non-state actors. On top of that, the inclusion of only consultation is also potentially a loophole, unless the law is left open on purpose. Therefore a clear definition for “consultation” is also needed to clarify which acts constitute consultation and is thus forbidden.

3. How would this affect FDI and foreign businesses in Vietnam and their needs to remain “private” as they call themselves?
Nguyen Quang Vu, a business lawyer from Venture North Law Limited, told local press that the provisions are “irrational”. He also said that private firms have their own regulations about asset transparency and control and supervision over all activities of their heads. Thus the state should not interfere in their activities. Private firms often have many stakeholders, whose interests are protected by the law and the firms’ regulations. The stakeholders are responsible for their assets, not the state.
Do you agree with him? Why/why not?

OM: Private firms may have their own regulations about asset transparency and control supervision over the activities of their employees and executives. I agree with the fact that laws should not interfere with businesses’ activities. The firms may have internal motivations to do this, for example to prevent embezzlement and abuse of corporate funds, ensure business efficiency and trust.

Having said that, some external motivations can also be useful. Providing clear laws on the illegality of such acts can also incentivize businesses to create internal regulations that comply with laws, but also give the businesses a legal recourse in the event that an individual within their company does abuse the regulations. Without legal consequences, the only recourse for a business in such situations may be to dismiss and civil action against the individuals. The additional severity from legal consequences can be both a deterrent and correctional mechanism.

The key point here is that the law-makers must find a balance between upholding the benefits of anti-corruption whilst not overly impeding upon the business’ interests, and also comply with the provisions of international agreements of which Vietnam is a member.

4. What’s your comment on the expansion of Vietnam’s anti-corruption fight to private sector? Considering the existing Criminal Law also covers these entities with specific punishments? What else can the government do? Do you foresee any chilling effect this law would have on legitimate private business?

OM: As mentioned in question 3, corruption within the non-state actor can be classified into three categories: corruption within one non-state actor, corruption between two or more non-state actors, and corruption between non-state actors and state actors.

The justification for expanding corruption to include the non-state sector is that such corruption reduces competition in the market, negatively affects the businesses’ operations and in turn hampers the country’s economy as a whole. Expansion of corruption to the non-state sector will also be consistent with Criminal Code 2015 regulating the responsibilities of individuals within private businesses for acts of embezzlement and bribery.[1]

It is clear that the intention behind including non-state actors in the new Anti-corruption law is to target corrupt acts of individuals in a non-state actor, especially those that operate on a large scale such as public companies, commercial banks and investment funds which handle extremely large sums of money and can potentially impact the rights and benefits of many other individuals and businesses. Although many of such acts are also already covered by the Criminal Code 2015, nevertheless the duplication in the Anti-Corruption Law may hold a symbolic significance, to clearly signify the severity and also moral and political implications of such acts.

The law also needs to find a balance between regulating and preventing corruption in the private sector, but also a law not too intrusive that it over-burdens legitimate private businesses, especially SMEs where they are less likely to have the resources to bear the costs.Thus the current inclusion of the whole private sector in anti-corruption law is too expansive. The law should not be all-inclusive, but perhaps include only certain private sector actors to avoid over-burdening the private sector because the Criminal Code 2015 covers large parts already. Overlapping regulations do serve nobody.

***
Please do contact Dr. Oliver Massmann under omassmann@duanemorris.com or any other lawyers in our office listing if you have any questions on the above. Dr. Oliver Massmann is the General Director or Duane Morris Vietnam LLC.

Vietnam – Power Energy Action Plan – With Outlook on the Major Trade Agreements CPTPP, EUVNFTA and Investment Protection Agreement

A. Overview of the Power Master Plan 8

Vietnam contains huge potential regarding the production of clean energy. It has best conditions for developing solar power due to being one of the countries with the most sun hours during the year and best conditions for creating wind power due to 3000km coastline. As a result, Vietnam in general, is able to attract many Foreign Direct Investments (FDI) for developing clean energy projects.

Therefore, the aim of the current Power Master Plan 8 (PMP8) is to develop power sources, in which renewable energy (wind, solar, bio) will be prioritized, in order to stepwise increase the proportion of electricity generated from renewable energy sources. Core elements are to establish links between international and domestic companies. Thus, the international finance and technology should be connected to the domestic banks and the expertise of domestic companies. In addition, a market must be developed that attracts large-scale companies and small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) equally.

Furthermore, there will be improvements to the solar power market and the Solar Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) model, which could apply from 1 July 2019. If the PPA is improved to meet the standards of international and domestic banks, the cost of financing solar power plants can be reduced. Feed-in tariffs could provide 2 billion USD in foreign investment in solar energy by 2020.

The new PPA should focus on the key areas termination payments, curtailment and failure to take or pay by Vietnam Electricity (EVN), dispute resolution / arbitration clauses and the application of the feed-in-tariff for 20 years the PPA for new solar projects, which reach their commercial operation date by 30th June 2021 with a reduced feed in tariff. These improvements should equally apply to the standard PPAs for wind power, biomass and waste to energy.

In addition, a government market-driven electricity price system should be created, which includes a welfare state price system and thus supports low-income citizens. To make this possible, the price for the middle class has to be raised. Furthermore, the need for government guarantees must be reduced. In order to counteract electricity wastefulness, incentives for private sector investment in distributed clean energy generation and energy efficiency with fair and transparent electricity tariffs are necessary.

With regard to the price of electricity, there will be essentially three types of movement. First, the daytime hourly tariff will be redesigned for commercial and industrial consumers. This is intended to reduce the peak load of the transmission system and transmission losses. Second, regional differences in retail tariffs are developed. Third, a market-based electricity tariff is set, which contains flexible regulations and thus allows adjustments and increases in efficiency.

It will be important for the government to upgrade transmission and distribution. A regulator regime is to build, which allows and encourages construction and use of bio-mass, solar, wind and other clean sources of power generation for private and public users – office, residential, manufacturing, communities, and industrial – small scale and large scale, and to speed up decision making and set predicative procedures to encourage development of off shore gas, LNG, efficiencies, and renewables.

B. Future recommendations for VL Direct Power Purchase Agreement

The Application of PPA should be extended and even used for commercial power consumers (offices, hotels, resorts and supermarkets), hence they can reduce their electricity costs. The project aim should be to make a major investment in clean energy generation. Guidelines could be to reach at least 300MW of new clean energy generation in 2018/2019 and to invest about 400 Million USD.

The Electricity Regulatory Authority of Vietnam (ERAV) and EVN must define as soon as possible a so-called “wheeling fee”. Wheeling is the transportation of electric energy (megawatt-hours) from within an electrical grid to an electrical load outside the grid boundaries. At least for the first 5 years of operation the fee should be fixed. Afterwards, an increase is possible in agreed in conjunction with business groups and WE.

C. Outlook on Major Trade Agreements TPP 11, EUVNFTA and Investment Protection Agreement

In January 2017, US President Donald Trump decided to withdraw from the US’ participation in the TPP. In November 2017, the remaining TPP members met at the APEC meetings and concluded about pushing forward the now called CPTPP (TPP 11) without the USA. The provision of the agreement specified that it enters into effect 60 days after ratification by at least 50% of the signatories (six of the eleven participating countries). The sixth nation to ratify the deal was Australia on 31 October 2018, therefore the agreement will finally come into force on 30 December 2018. Recently, on the 12th November 2018, Vietnam has officially become the seventh member of the CPTPP.

The CPTPP is targeting to eliminate tariff lines and custom duties among member states on certain goods and commodities to 100%. This will make the Vietnamese market more attractive due to technology advances, reduction of production costs and because of the high demand on renewable energy. Sustainable environments are a primary concern of the CPTPP agreement.

An increase of trade should not mean negative influence to the environment. In contrary, due to the increased focus on the need for energy efficiency and reduced emissions renewable energy could experience a crucial growth. The agreement is suitable to support Public-Private-Partnerships (PPPs), which could lead to a positive impact in development of innovative technologies and alternative energy sources. Lower or no trade tariffs can lead to lower import costs for the essential components of renewable energy production. This, in turn, results in lower investment costs and lower production costs, thus increasing the cost-effectiveness of introducing renewable energy technology.

One another notable major trade agreement is the European Union Vietnam Free Trade Agreement (EUVNFTA). The EUVNFTA offers great opportunity to access new markets for both the EU and Vietnam and to bring more capital into Vietnam due easier access and reduction of almost all tariffs of 99%, as well as obligation to provide better conditions for workers, which is a key aspect in terms of working at power plants. In addition, the EUVNFTA will boost the most economic sectors in Vietnam. Moreover, the EUVNFTA will provide certain tax reductions to 0% for clean technology equipment as well as equal treatment for companies. Due to easier opportunity on making business, trade and sustainable development will be a good consequence for an even more dynamic economy and even better investment environment in Vietnam in general and especially in the power/energy industry.

Both agreements promise great benefits for the energy sector in Vietnam and will help the PMP8 to connect international to domestic companies. The elimination of the tariff lines and custom duties are advantages to major companies and SMEs alike.

To enable at least some parts of the FTA to be ratified more speedily at EU level, the EU and Vietnam agreed to take provisions on investment, for which Member State ratification is required, out of the main agreement and put them in a separate Investment Protection Agreement (IPA). Currently both the FTA and IPA are expected to be formally submitted to the Council in late 2018, possibly enabling the FTA to come into force in the second half of 2019.

Furthermore, the Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) will ensure highest standards of legal certainty and enforceability and protection for investors. We alert investors to make use of these standards! We can advise how to best do that! It is going to be applied under the TPP 11 and the EUVNFTA. Under that provision, for investment related disputes, the investors have the right to bring claims to the host country by means of international arbitration. The arbitration proceedings shall be made public as a matter of transparency in conflict cases. In relation to the TPP, the scope of the ISDS was reduced by removing references to “investment agreements” and “investment authorization” as result of the discussion about the TPP’s future on the APEC meetings on 10th and 11th November 2017.

Further securities come with the Government Procurement Agreement (GPA), which is going to be part of the TPP 11 and the EUVNFTA. The GPA in both agreements, mainly deals with the requirement to treat bidders or domestic bidders with investment capital and Vietnamese bidders equally when a government buys goods or requests for a service worth over the specified threshold. Vietnam undertakes to timely publish information on tender, allow sufficient time for bidders to prepare for and submit bids, maintain confidentiality of tenders. The GPA in both agreements also requires its Parties assess bids based on fair and objective principles, evaluate and award bids only based on criteria set out in notices and tender documentation, create an effective regime for complaints and settling disputes, etc.

This instrument will ensure a fair competition and projects of quality and efficient developing processes.

If you have any question on the above, please do not hesitate to contact Dr. Oliver Massmann under omassmann@duanemorris.com. Dr. Oliver Massmann is the General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC.

Thank you very much!

Rechtsanwalt in Vietnam Dr. Oliver Massmann – Aktionsplan für Energie – Mit Ausblick auf die wichtigsten Handelsabkommen CPTPP, EUVNFTA und das Investitionsschutzabkommen

A. Überblick über den Power Master Plan 8

Vietnam birgt ein enormes Potenzial für die Erzeugung sauberer Energien. Es bietet die besten Voraussetzungen für die Entwicklung von Solarenergie, da es eines der Länder mit den meisten Sonnenstunden im Jahr ist und aufgrund der 3000 km langen Küste die besten Voraussetzungen für die Erzeugung von Windkraft. Daher kann Vietnam im Allgemeinen viele ausländische Direktinvestitionen (FDI) für die Entwicklung sauberer Energieprojekte anziehen.
Ziel des aktuellen Power Master Plans 8 (PMP8) ist es daher, Energiequellen zu entwickeln, bei denen erneuerbare Energien (Wind, Solar, Bio) priorisiert werden, um den Anteil erneuerbarer Energien schrittweise zu erhöhen. Kernelemente sind Verbindungen zwischen internationalen und inländischen Unternehmen. Daher sollte das internationale Finanzwesen und die internationale Technologie mit den inländischen Banken und dem Fachwissen der inländischen Unternehmen verknüpft werden. Darüber hinaus muss ein Markt entwickelt werden, der Großunternehmer und kleinere und mittlere Unternehmer (KMU) gleichermaßen anzieht.

Ferner wird es Verbesserungen am Solarstrommarkt und für das Solar Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) Modell geben, die ab dem 1. Juli 2019 gelten könnten. Wenn das PPA dearat verbessert wird, um den Standards internationaler und inländischer Banken zu entsprechen, können die Kosten für die Finanzierung von Solarenergiekraftwerken reduziert werden. Einspeisevergütungen könnten bis zum Jahr 2020 ausländische Investitionen in Solarenergie in Höhe von 2 Mrd. USD ermöglichen.

Das neue PPA sollte sich auf die Kernbereiche der Kündigungsentschädigung, die Kürzung und Nichtübernahme oder Nichtzahlung seitens Vietnam Electricity (EVN), Konfliktlösungs- / Schiedsklauseln und die Anwendung des Einspeisetarifs für 20 Jahre des PPAs für neue Solarprojekte, die ihren kommerziellen Betrieb bis zum 30. Juni 2021 mit einem reduzierten Einspeisetarif erreichen, konzentrieren. Diese Verbesserungen sollten auch für die Standard-PPAs für Windenergie, Biomasse und Energiegewinnung gelten.

Darüber hinaus sollte ein staatlich marktorientiertes Strompreissystem geschaffen werden, das ein System des Wohlfahrtsstaats beinhaltet und somit einkommensschwache Bürger unterstützt. Um dies zu ermöglichen, muss der Preis für die Mittelklasse angehoben werden. Ferner muss der Bedarf an staatlichen Garantien reduziert werden. Um der Verschwendung von Elektrizität entgegenzuwirken, sind Anreize für Investitionen des privaten Sektors in dezentrale saubere Energieerzeugung und Energieeffizienz mit fairen und transparenten Stromtarifen erforderlich.
Bezüglich des Strompreises gibt es im Wesentlichen drei Arten von Bewegungen. Erstens wird der Tagestundentarif für gewerbliche und industrielle Verbraucher umgestaltet. Dadurch sollen die Spitzenlast des Übertragungssystems und Übertragungsverluste reduziert werden. Zweitens entwickeln sich regionale Unterschiede bei den Einzelhandelstarifen. Drittens wird ein marktgerechter Stromtarif festgelegt, der flexible Regelungen enthält und somit Anpassungen und Effizienzsteigerungen ermöglicht.

Für die Regierung wird es wichtig sein, die Übertragung und Verteilung zu verbessern. Ein Regulierungssystem soll gebaut werden, das den Bau und die Nutzung von Biomasse, Solar, Wind und anderen sauberen Stromerzeugungsquellen für private und öffentliche Nutzer – Büro, Wohngebäude, Industrie, Kommunen und Industrie – in kleinem und großem Umfang ermöglicht sowie die Entscheidungsfindung beschleunigt und prädikative Verfahren festlegt, um die Entwicklung von Offshore-Gas, LNG, Effizienz und erneuerbaren Energien zu fördern.

B. Zukünftige Empfehlungen für VL Direct Power Purchase Agreement

Die Anwendung von PPA sollte erweitert und sogar für gewerbliche Stromverbraucher (Büros, Hotels, Resorts und Supermärkte) eingesetzt werden, wodurch sie ihre Stromkosten senken können. Das Projektziel sollte darin bestehen, eine große Investition in die saubere Energieerzeugung zu tätigen. Richtwerte könnten dabei sein, im Jahr 2018/2019 mindestens 300 MW neue saubere Energieerzeugung zu erreichen und etwa 400 Millionen USD zu investieren.

Die Elektrizitätsregulierungsbehörde von Vietnam (ERAV) und die EVN müssen so schnell wie möglich eine sogenannte „Wheeling-Gebühr“ festlegen. Wheeling ist der Transport elektrischer Energie (Megawattstunden) aus einem elektrischen Netz zu einer elektrischen Last außerhalb der Netzgrenzen. Zumindest für die ersten fünf Betriebsjahre sollte die Gebühr festgesetzt werden. Danach ist eine Erhöhung in Absprache mit den Unternehmensgruppen und WE möglich.

C. Ausblick auf die wichtigsten Handelsabkommen TPP11, EUVNFTA und das Investitionsschutzabkommen

US-Präsident Donald Trump hat im Januar 2017 beschlossen, sich von der US-Beteiligung am TPP zurückzuziehen. Im November 2017 trafen sich die verbleibenden TPP-Mitglieder auf dem APEC-Treffen und beschlossen, das nunmehr genannte CPTPP (TPP 11) ohne die USA voranzutreiben. Die Bestimmung der Vereinbarung sah vor, dass sie 60 Tage nach der Ratifizierung von mindestens 50% der Unterzeichner (sechs der elf teilnehmenden Länder) in Kraft tritt. Das sechste Land, das das Abkommen ratifiziert hatte, war Australien am 31. Oktober 2018. Daher wird das Abkommen am 30. Dezember 2018 endgültig in Kraft treten. Kürzlich wurde Vietnam am 12. November 2018 offiziell das siebte Mitglied der CPTPP.

Das CPTPP zielt darauf ab, Zolllinien und Zölle zwischen den Mitgliedstaaten für bestimmte Waren und Güter zu 100% zu beseitigen. Dadurch wird der vietnamesische Markt aufgrund von technologischen Fortschritten, Senkung der Produktionskosten und der hohen Nachfrage nach erneuerbaren Energien attraktiver. Nachhaltige Umgebungen sind ein Hauptanliegen der CPTPP-Vereinbarung.

Eine Zunahme des Handels sollte keinen negativen Einfluss auf die Umwelt haben. Im Gegenteil, könnten erneuerbare Energien aufgrund des zunehmenden Fokus auf Energieeffizienz und Emissionssenkungen ein entscheidendes Wachstum erfahren. Das Abkommen ist geeignet, um öffentlich-private Partnerschaften (PPP) zu unterstützen, die sich positiv auf die Entwicklung innovativer Technologien und alternativer Energiequellen auswirken könnten. Niedrigere oder gar keine Handelszölle können zu niedrigeren Importkosten für die wesentlichen Komponenten der Erzeugung erneuerbarer Energien führen. Dies führt wiederum zu niedrigeren Investitionskosten und niedrigeren Produktionskosten, wodurch die Wirtschaftlichkeit der Einführung der Technologie für erneuerbare Energien erhöht wird.

Ein weiteres bemerkenswertes wichtiges Handelsabkommen ist das European Union Vietnam Free Trade Agreement (EUVNFTA). Das EUVNFTA bietet großartige Möglichkeiten, neue Märkte sowohl für die EU als auch für Vietnam zu erschließen und mehr Kapital nach Vietnam zu bringen, da der Zugang erleichtert wird und fast alle Zölle um zu 99% reduziert werden, und die Verpflichtung, bessere Arbeitsbedingungen zu schaffen, ein Schlüsselelement in Bezug auf die Arbeit in Kraftwerken ist. Darüber hinaus wird das EUVNFTA die meisten Wirtschaftssektoren in Vietnam stärken. Darüber hinaus wird das EUVNFTA bestimmte Steuerermäßigungen für umweltfreundliche Ausrüstung bis 0% sowie die Gleichbehandlung von Unternehmen vorsehen. Aufgrund der einfacheren Geschäftsmöglichkeiten werden Handel und nachhaltige Entwicklung postive Folgen für eine noch dynamischere Wirtschaft und ein noch besseres Investitionsumfeld in Vietnam im Allgemeinen und insbesondere in der Strom- und Energiebranche haben.

Beide Abkommen versprechen große Vorteile für den Energiesektor in Vietnam und werden dem PMP8 helfen, internationale Unternehmen mit inländischen Unternehmen zu vernetzen. Die Abschaffung der Zolltarife und Zölle sind für große Unternehmen und KMU gleichermaßen von Vorteil.

Damit zumindest einige Teile des Freihandelsabkommens auf EU-Ebene schneller ratifiziert werden können, haben die EU und Vietnam vereinbart, Investitionsbestimmungen, für die eine Ratifizierung durch die Mitgliedstaaten erforderlich ist, aus dem Hauptabkommen zu ziehen und diese in dem gesonderten Investment Protection Agreement (IPA) aufzuführen. Derzeit wird erwartet, dass sowohl das Freihandelsabkommen als auch das IPA Ende 2018 förmlich dem Rat vorgelegt werden, wodurch möglicherweise das Freihandelsabkommen in der zweiten Hälfte des Jahres 2019 in Kraft treten kann.

Darüber hinaus sorgt das Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) für höchste Standards der Rechtssicherheit sowie der Durchsetzbarkeit und des Schutzes der Anleger. Wir machen Investoren darauf aufmerksam, diese Standards zu nutzen! Wir können beraten, wie das am besten geht! Es wird im Rahmen des TPP 11 und des EUVNFTA angewendet. Nach dieser Bestimmung haben die Anleger bei Streitigkeiten im Zusammenhang mit Investitionen das Recht, durch internationale Schiedsverfahren Ansprüche an das Gastland zu erheben. Das Schiedsverfahren wird aus Gründen der Transparenz in Konfliktfällen öffentlich gemacht. In Bezug auf das TPP wurde der Geltungsbereich des ISDS reduziert, indem Bezugnahmen auf “Investitionsvereinbarungen” und “Investitionsgenehmigungen” als Ergebnis der Diskussion über die Zukunft des TPP auf den APEC-Sitzungen am 10. und 11. November 2017 entfernt wurden.

Weitere Sicherheiten sind im Government Procurement Agreement (GPA) enthalten, das Bestandteil des TPP 11 und des EUVNFTA sein wird. Das GPA beider Verträge behandelt hauptsächlich die Anforderung, Bieter oder inländische Bieter mit Investitionskapital und vietnamesischen Bietern gleich zu behandeln, wenn eine Regierung Waren kauft oder eine Dienstleistung in Höhe des festgelegten Schwellenwerts anfordert. Vietnam verpflichtet sich, Informationen zu Ausschreibungen rechtzeitig zu veröffentlichen, den Bietern ausreichend Zeit zu geben, Angebote vorzubereiten und einzureichen, und die Vertraulichkeit der Angebote zu wahren. Das GPA in beiden Abkommen verlangt auch, dass die Vertragsparteien Angebote auf der Grundlage fairer und objektiver Grundsätze bewerten, Angebote nur anhand der in Bekanntmachungen und Ausschreibungsunterlagen festgelegten Kriterien bewerten und vergeben, ein wirksames System für Beschwerden und Streitbeilegung schaffen usw.

Dieses Instrument gewährleistet einen fairen Wettbewerb und Projekte von Qualität und effizienten Entwicklungsprozessen.
Wenn Sie dazu Fragen haben, wenden Sie sich bitte an Dr. Oliver Massmann unter omassmann@duanemorris.com. Dr. Oliver Massmann ist Generaldirektor von Duane Morris Vietnam LLC.

Vielen Dank!

VIETNAM – SECURITIES AND BANKING GUIDE UPDATE 2018

The State Bank of Vietnam (Ngan hang Nha nuoc Viet Nam, SBV) is the central bank of Vietnam. It is a ministry-level body under the administration of the government. The SBV governor is a member of the cabinet. The prime minister and the parliament of Vietnam (National Assembly) act jointly to nominate the governor of the SBV. The governor is in charge for five years. The SBV’s principal roles are to:

• Support monetary stability and implement monetary policies.
• Support institutions’ stability and supervise financial institutions.
• Support banking facilities and recommend economic policies to the government.
• Support banking facilities for financial institutions.
• Manage the country’s foreign exchange reserves.
• Manage foreign exchange and gold trading activities.
• Manage the borrowing and repayment of foreign loans, the provision of loans to foreign parties and recovery of foreign debts.
• Print and issue bank notes.
• Supervise all commercial banks’ activities in Vietnam.
• Lend State money to commercial banks.
• Join the Ministry of Finance in issuing government bonds and government-guaranteed bonds.
• Act as an agent for the State Treasury in organising bids and in issuing, depositing and making payment for treasury bonds and bills.
• Be in charge of other roles in monetary management and foreign exchange rates.

In 1990 the bank system was reorganised. This process led to a separation of the SBV from other commercial banks and was the start of the establishment of the private banking sector. A small number of major state-owned commercial banks still dominate Vietnam’s banking sector. However, today a process of privatisation is underway and the goal is to reduce the State’s share of ownership step-by-step to at least 65% during 2018 – 2020, and 51 percent during 2021 – 2025 under Decision No. 986/QĐ-TTg dated August 8, 2018 of the Prime Minister approving the plan for development of Vietnamese banks up to 2025, vision to 2030. Until June 30, 2018, the State’s ownership ratios in 4 largest state-owned commercial banks are as follows: (i) 95.28% in BIDV, (ii) 77.1% in Vietcombank, (iii) 64.46% in Vietinbank, and (iv) 100% in Agribank.

Foreign ownership restrictions for Vietnamese Credit Institutions

On January 3, 2014, the government-adopted Decree 01/2014/ND-CP on purchase by foreign investors of shareholding in Vietnamese credit institutions. Decree 01 became effective on February 20, 2014 and replaced Decree 69/2007/ND-CP on purchase by foreign investors of shareholding in Vietnamese commercial banks.

In Decree 01, Vietnamese credit institutions, which may offer shares, include:

1. shareholding credit institutions (i.e., a credit institution established and organised in the form of a shareholding company and include shareholding commercial banks, shareholding finance companies and shareholding finance leasing companies); and
2. credit institution currently converting its legal form from a credit institution operating in the form of a limited liability company to become a credit institution operating in the form of a shareholding company.

Foreign investor includes foreign organisations [institutions] and foreign individuals. Foreign organisations include:

1. organisations established and operating under the laws of a foreign country and any branch of such institutions overseas or in Vietnam; and
2. an organisation, closed-ended fund, members’ fund or securities investment company established and operating in Vietnam with foreign capital contribution ratio above 49 percent. Foreign individual means any person who does not hold Vietnamese nationality.

Decree 01 defines that shareholding ownership [shareholding] includes direct and indirect ownership. However, Decree 01 does not explain clearly the scope of direct and indirect ownership.

In a case of purchase of shareholding by a foreign investor in a Vietnamese credit institution resulting in such foreign investor’s ownership of shares below 5 percent charter capital of the Vietnamese credit institution, a prior approval of the SBV is not required. In other cases, any acquisition by foreign investors of shareholdings in a Vietnamese credit institution requires the prior approval of the SBV.

The shareholding ratio of any one foreign individual must not exceed 5 percent of the charter capital of one Vietnamese credit institution. The shareholding ratio of any one foreign organisation must not exceed 15 percent of the charter capital of one Vietnamese credit institution.

Any foreign investor being an organisation owning 10 percent or more of the charter capital of any one Vietnamese credit institution is not permitted to assign the shareholding it owns to any other organisation or individual within a minimum three year period as from the date of ownership of 10 percent or more of the charter capital in such credit institution.

The shareholding ratio of any one strategic foreign investor must not exceed 20 percent of the charter capital of one Vietnamese credit institution. The investor may not transfer its shares in the Vietnamese credit institution within five years after becoming the foreign strategic investor in the Vietnamese credit institution.

A strategic investor is defined as a foreign organisation with financial capacity and whose authorised person provides a written undertaking to have a close connection regarding long-term interests with the Vietnamese credit institution and to assist the latter to transfer to modern technology, to develop banking products and services, and to raise its financial, managerial and operational capacity.

The shareholding ratio of any one foreign investor and its affiliates must not exceed 20 percent of the charter capital of one Vietnamese credit institution. The total shareholding ownership of [all] foreign investors must not exceed 30 percent of the charter capital of any one Vietnamese commercial bank.

The total shareholding ownership of [all] foreign investors in any one Vietnamese non-banking credit institution shall be implemented in accordance with the law applicable to public companies and listed companies (i.e., 49 percent of charter capital of such institution).

In a special case in order to implement restructuring of a credit institution which is weak [and/or] facing difficulties, in order to ensure safety of the credit institution system, the Prime Minister may, on a case-by-case basis, make a decision on the total shareholding ratio of any one foreign organisation [or] any one foreign strategic investor, and the total level of shareholding of foreign investors in any weak shareholding credit institution which is restructured, in excess of the limits described above.

Under the Government’s instruction in 2018, the MoF is drafting a Government’s decree to allow foreign ownership ratio in commercial banks in Vietnam up to 50%. However, this decree would only be finalized and adopted in the fourth quarter of 2019.

Foreign exchange regulations

The Ordinance on Foreign Exchange, which was enacted by the Standing Committee of the National Assembly in December 2005 and became effective in June 2006, and amended on March 18, 2013, regulates currency exchange activities in Vietnam. The government has promulgated Decree No. 70/2014/ND-CP to provide guidelines for both the Ordinance on Foreign Exchange and its amendments on March 18, 2013.

Decree 70 became effective on September 5, 2014 and replaced Decree No. 160/2006/ND-CP dated December 28, 2006 to provide detailed implementation of the ordinance.

Decree 70 governs the foreign exchange activities of residents and non-residents in current transactions, capital transactions, foreign loan borrowing, use of foreign currency and provision of foreign exchange services, the foreign currency market and rates of exchange, and the management of import and export of gold in Vietnam.

With regards to foreign loan borrowing, the government has also promulgated Decree No. 219/2013/ND-CP dated December 26, 2013 on the management and repayment of offshore loans that are not guaranteed by the government. Decree 219 became effective on February 15, 2014 and replaced Decree 134/2005/ND-CP on the same subject.

Decree 219 governs all businesses that are incorporated under the Enterprises Law, credit institution and foreign bank branches under the Law on Credit Institution, and cooperatives and unions of cooperatives established and operating under the Law on Cooperatives.

Offshore loans under Decree 219 include loans from non-residents under loan agreements, deferred payment commodities sale and purchase agreements, entrusted loan agreements and debt instruments issuance agreements that are not guaranteed by the government. In general, foreign borrowing must comply with the regulations of, and is subject to, registration with the SBV.

However, Decree 219 does not state clearly that requirements and types of loans should be registered, or any licensing/registration procedures. These issues have been addressed by the SBV’s guidelines i.e., Circular 03/2016/TT-NHNN dated February 26, 2016 providing certain guidelines on foreign exchange control in relation to foreign borrowing activities (as amended by Circular 05/2016/TT-NHNN dated April 15, 2014 and Circular No. 05/2017/TT-NHNN dated 30 June 2017). Circular 03 is expected to improve the legal framework for management of the borrowing and repayment of enterprises in general and enterprises not guaranteed by the government. Some highlights of the Circular 03 are as follows:

• Loans made in the form of deferred payment for import of goods no longer requires registration with the SBV. However, the opening and use of bank accounts and remittance activities must comply with the requirements of Circular 03.

• Loans subject to registration with the State Bank include: (i) mid-term and long-term foreign loans, (ii) short-term foreign loans which are renewed to have loan terms to be more than 01 (one) year; and (iii) short-term foreign loans which are not renewed but loans’ outstanding principal amounts have not been fully repaid prior to or within 10 days after 1 year from the date of first loan withdrawal.

• A borrower which is not a foreign invested enterprise must open a bank account for the purposes of the foreign loan at the authorized banks in Vietnam. For foreign invested enterprises, their direct investment capital bank accounts may be used for this purpose.

• If the schedule of loan disbursement, repayment or interest payment changes by less than 10 days from the schedule already registered with the SBV, the borrower must only notify its bank, and does not need to register the changes with the SBV. However, if the schedule changes by more than 10 days, then reregistration with the SBV is required.

• Circular 03 also allows notification to SBV (instead of change registration) with regards to certain corporate changes of information that has been registered with SBV such as change of address of the borrower within the province/city where it has head quarter, or change of trade names of the relevant banks who provide account services, etc.

The government issued Decree No. 96/2014/ND-CP on October 17, 2014 on sanctions of administrative violations in the field of monetary and banking operations. Decree 96 became effective on December 12, 2014 and replaced (i) Decree No. 95/2011/ND-CP dated December 20, 2011, and (ii) Decree No. 202/2004/ND-CP dated December 10, 2004 on sanctions of administrative violations in the field of monetary and banking operations.

This decree was said to tighten up forex and gold trading and relevant activities in Vietnam. According to this decree, monetary penalties in relation to gold and forex trading, price listing/payment/advertising in forex/gold, etc. were significantly increased i.e., from VND 5 million ($240) to VND 600 million ($29,000). For instance, the possible penalty for violations re: trading on gold bars without license may be up to VND 500 million ($24,000) or a possible penalty for violations re: forex activities conducted by credit organizations without licenses may be up to VND 600 million ($29,000). In addition, forex/gold relevant to trading violations may be confiscated and certificate of registration for forex agent and business operation license of gold of relevant parties may be also suspended or revoked.

Recent developments of securities regulation

In early 2007 the first Securities Law of Vietnam (No. 70/2006/QH11, 2007) came into effect, which consisted of 11 chapters and 136 articles (as amended on November 24, 2010). The Securities Law primarily covers domestic issues of Vietnam dong-denominated securities and is, therefore, limited to public issues of securities and does not apply to the private placement of unlisted securities. The term “securities” covers a wide range of valuable instruments, including:

• Stocks.
• Bonds.
• Warrants.
• Certificates.
• Put and call options.
• Futures contracts, irrespective of their form.
• Investment capital contribution contracts.

Specifically, the Securities Law governs:

• Public offerings of securities.
• Listings.
• Dealing.
• Trading.
• Investment in securities.
• Securities services.

The establishment and regulation of securities companies and investment funds.

The Securities Law’s area of application considers two types of domestic securities trading market — the Securities Trading Centre and the Stock Exchange. The local regulator, the State Securities Commission, controls and supervises both markets; however, they are independent legal entities. The SSC is a State body that the Ministry of Finance oversees. The government and the MoF have issued several decrees, decisions and circulars to implement the Securities Law. Under the Securities Law, publicly offered securities in Vietnam have to be denominated in VND. The par value of a listed share is VND 10,000; however, the minimum par value of a publicly offered loan is VND 100,000.

On January 10, 2012, the MoF issued Decision No. 62/QD-BTC re: approval of project plan for restructuring of securities companies. This decision was known as a key in the master plan to renovate the stock market/sector, insurance market and securities companies which have been submitted to the Party Politburo by the MoF. According to this decision, securities companies shall be evaluated based on available capital/risk/accumulated losses index and categorised into three groups (normal, control and special control).

The decision does not provide any clear restructuring plan but promulgates certain controlling methods and penalties applicable to securities companies not satisfying the required available capital/risk index such as disclosure/report requirements, supervising or license withdrawal. On August 2018, the Deputy Prime Minister Vuong Dinh Hue instructed the MoF to do research and issue a new plan for restructuring the securities market up to 2020, vision to 2025. The detail project plan is expected to be promulgated and implemented early next year 2019.

Dated July 20, 2012, Decree No. 58/2012/ND-CP was issued to provide guidelines for the Securities Law and the Law amending certain articles of the Securities Laws on offers for sale of securities, listing, trading, business and investment in securities, and services in relation to securities and securities market. This decree abolished Decree No. 14/2007/ND-CP dated January 19, 2007, Decree 84/2010/ND-CP dated August 2, 2010 and Decree 01/2010/ND-CP dated January 4, 2010 and Decree No. 58/2012/ND-CP.

On June 26, 2015, the government promulgated Decree No. 60/2015/ND-CP amending certain articles of Decree 58 and providing guidelines for Securities Laws. Decree 60 became effective on September 1, 2015 and abolish Decision No. 55/QD-TTg dated April 15, 2009 of the Prime Minister on foreign ownership ratio in Vietnamese stock exchanges.

Decree 60 does not limit foreign ownership applicable to companies engaging in non-conditional businesses in Vietnam, and allow foreign companies to invest in government’s and companies’ bonds in Vietnam.

The draft amended Law on Securities is underway and expected to be promulgated in the fourth quarter of 2019. This draft is aimed at restructuring the stock markets, re-organizing and improving securities and fund companies, and lifting further outstanding limitation on foreign ownership of public companies in Vietnam.

Public offerings

With the promulgation of the Securities Law and its amendments, guidelines, rules, procedures and restrictions were set down for the issuance of public shares and bonds. According to Article 12.1 of the Securities Law and its amendments, an issuer must have already deposited nominal capital amounting to at least VND10 billion at the time of registration of the offer. In addition, an applicant for quotation has to prove profit was made in the year before the offering.

The establishment of a fund stipulates a minimum capital of VND50 billion. Other types of enterprise may have to apply to additional conditions e.g., a public company registering a public offer of securities must provide an undertaking, passed by its general meeting of shareholders, to place the shares for trading on an organised trading market within one year from the date of completion of the offer tranche (Law amending certain articles of the Securities Law dated November 24, 2010 and Decree No. 58/2012/ND-CP dated July 20, 2012 guiding Securities Law and Law amending certain Article of the Securities Law).

To open the procedure for public offering it is necessary to file an application in the form of a registration statement, which includes:

• The prospectus.
• The audited financial statements for the preceding two fiscal years.
• The issuer’s constitutional documents and relevant corporate resolutions.

The main contents of a prospectus are prescribed in Circular No. 29/2017/TT-BTC dated April 12, 2017 of the MoF providing guidance on listing of securities on stock exchanges. Foreign investors should be aware of the lack of fixed standards for financial statements and accounting in Vietnam, which can result in inconsistencies in financial reporting and quality levels.

Private placements

A private placement is defined in the Securities Law and its amendment as an arrangement for offering securities to less than one hundred investors, not professional securities investors, without using mass media or the internet. Decree 58/2012/ND-CP dated July 20, 2012 (as amended by Decree 60/2015/ND-CP dated June 26, 2015) and Securities Law provide conditions for a private placement made by public companies as follows:
o Resolution of the general meeting of shareholders approving the plan for a private placement of shares / convertible bonds and utilisation of proceeds earned from the offer tranche; and this plan must specify the objective, target investors and criteria for selection of target investors, the number of investors and proposed offering scale;

o The lock-up period on transfer of the private placed shares or convertible bonds is a minimum one year from the date of completion of the offer trance, except for certain cases such as a private placement pursuant to a plan selecting employees, etc.;

o The issuing company is not the parent company of the company which purchasing private placed shares; or neither of companies are subsidiary companies of a parent company;

o There must be a minimum interval of six months between tranches of private placements of shares or convertible loans; and

o Other conditions set out by the applicable law.

If an application file is incomplete and invalid, the competent State authority shall, within five days from the date of receipt of the application file for registration of a private placement of shares, provide its opinion in writing requesting the issuing organisation to amend the file. The date of receipt of the valid and complete file shall be the date on which the issuing organisation completes amendment and addition to the file.

Within 15 days from the date of receipt of the valid and compete file for registration, the State authority provides notification to the registering organisation and publish on its website the private placement of shares of the registering organisation. The issuing organisation shall, within 10 days from the selling tranche completion date, submit a report on the results of the private placement to the competent State authority on the standard form annexed to Decree 58 (as amended).

Listing

Ho Chi Minh Stock Exchange (HOSE)

Decree 58/2012/ND-CP provides conditions for listing shares in HOSE as follows, among other things:
• The company has its paid-up charter capital of one hundred and 120 billion dong or more at the time of registration for listing;

• The company has operated for at least two years in the form of a shareholding company calculated up to the time of registration for listing; the ratio of equity over after-tax profit (ROE) in the most recent year was a minimum five percent and the business operation in the two consecutive years immediately preceding the year of registration for listing must have been profitable; it does not have debts payable which are overdue for more than one year; it does not have accumulated losses calculated to the year of registration for listing; and it complies with the provisions of law on accounting and financial statements;

• Any member of the board of management or board of controllers, the director (general director), deputy director (deputy general director), chief accountant, a major shareholder and affiliated persons must make public disclosure of any debts they owe to the company;

• At least 20 percent of the voting shares in the company must be held by at least 300 shareholders who are not major shareholders; and

• Certain shareholders such as members of the board of management or board of controllers, etc. must undertake to hold 100 percent of the shares they own for six months from the date of listing and 50 percent of this number of shares for the following six months.

Hanoi Stock Exchange (HNX)

Decree 58/2012/ND-CP provides conditions for listing shares in HNX as follows, among other things:

• The company has its paid-up charter capital of 30 billion dong or more at the time of registration for listing;

• The company has operated for at least one year in the form of a shareholding company calculated up to the time of registration for listing; the ratio of equity over after-tax profit (ROE) in the most recent year was a minimum five percent; it does not have debts payable which are overdue for more than one year; it does not have accumulated losses calculated to the year of registration for listing; and it complies with the provisions of law on accounting and financial statements;

• At least 15 percent of the voting shares in the company must be held by at least 100 shareholders who are not major shareholders; and

• Certain shareholders such as members of the board of management or board of controllers, etc. must undertake to hold 100 percent of the shares they own for six months from the date of listing and 50 percent of this number of shares for the following six months.

Registration at HOSE and HNX

Companies wishing to register to list securities must lodge an application file for registration for listing with the HOSE/HNX. An application file for registration to list shares shall comprise the following key documents, among other things:

• General meeting of shareholders’ approval;

• Register of shareholders, as entered one month prior to the date of lodging the application;

• Prospectus;

• Undertaking of certain shareholders such as members of the board of management or board of controllers, the director (general director), deputy director (deputy general director) and the chief accountant of the company, etc. to hold 100 percent of the shares they own for six months from the date of listing and 50 percent of this number of shares for the following six months;

• Certificate from the Securities Depository Centre confirming registration by the institution and deposit of the shares at such Centre; and

• Written consent from the State Bank in the case of a shareholding credit institution.

The HOSE/HNX shall approve or refuse to approve an application for registration for listing within 30 days from the date of receipt of a complete and valid application file, and in a case of refusal shall specify its reasons in writing.

Decree No. 60/2015/ND-CP dated September 1, 2015 on foreign ownership in stock market

In April 2009, the Prime Minister issued Decision 55/2009/QD-TTg governing the purchase and sale of “securities in Vietnam’s stock market”. It stipulates the difference between local investors and foreign investors, in accordance with foreign-invested local investment funds. It also states the 49 percent rule. This means that local investment funds and local securities investment companies are considered foreign investors if foreigners hold more than 49 percent of the interest of a corporation.

The above limitation of 49 percent was removed on September 1, 2015 under Decree No. 60/2015/ND-CP, i.e., generally there is no limitation on foreign ownership ratio except for “conditional” sectors. In particular, the new limitation will now be subject to the WTO commitments or other specific domestic law (e.g., the 30 percent cap in the banking sector).

If there is a conditional business that specific foreign ownership restriction under domestic law has yet to be specified, then the limitation is 49 percent. If there is no restriction and the sector is not a conditional business under domestic law (e.g., distribution companies), then there is no limit for the foreign shareholding ratio.

This rule also applies to equitized state-owned enterprises in order to attract more foreign investments. Decree 60 also removes all restrictions to foreign investors to invest in bonds. With respect to securities investment certificates or derivative products of stocks of public companies, the restriction will be also removed.

Circular 123/2015/BTC

At the end of 2008, two years after the first Securities Law, the SSC and the MoF enacted Decision 121/2008/QD-BTC to make the market more interesting for foreign investment as well as to penalise those who disobey the Securities Law. Decision 121 governed the activities of foreign investors in the Vietnamese securities market.

On December 6, 2012, the MoF adopted Circular 213/2012/TT-BTC governing foreign investors’ activities in Vietnamese securities market. Circular 213 became effective on February 15, 2013 and replaced Decision 121.

On August 18, 2015, the MoF issued Circular 123/2015/TT-BTC governing foreign investment activities in Vietnamese securities market (became effective on October 1, 2015), to guide Decree 60 and replace Circular 213.

Circular 123 provides detailed documents and procedure for foreign investors to operate in the Vietnam’s stock exchanges. The circular streamlines the procedures for market participation of foreign investors in the Vietnam’s stock market by reducing the amount of necessary documentation and simplify the procedure. For example, the circular removes the need to translate documents into Vietnamese by allowing them to be submitted in English.

The circular sets out that domestic business organizations with foreign ownership of 51 percent or more, are required to apply for the Securities Trading Code (STC) before trading shares, bonds or other types of securities under the securities market regulations.

Notification procedure on foreign ownership limits (FOL).

Circular 123 requires that public companies are responsible for determining the applicable FOL. Following the determination of the FOL which is applicable to them, companies not subject to any limit are obliged to file a notification dossier with the State Securities Commission (SSC). This dossier includes: (i) extracted information on business lines as uploaded on the National Business Registration Portal and the electronic address linking to such information; and (ii) Minutes of Meeting and the Resolution of the Board of Management approving the unrestricted FOL (if the company does not wish to maintain an FOL) or Minutes of Meeting and the Resolution of the General Shareholders’ Meeting approving and the charter providing for the specific FOL (if the company wishes to maintain FOL).

The SSC will have 10 working days to acknowledge in writing the notification on FOL. Within one working day of the receipt of SSC’s acknowledgment on the applicable FOL, public companies are required to publish this information on their website, which gives effect to the published FOL.

Circular 123 provides that foreign ownership in securities companies is unlimited. However, foreign investors must satisfy certain qualification and conditions provided by the applicable law. A qualified foreign investor who wishes to own more than 51 percent in a securities company must obtain the SSC’s prior approval, which may be issued within 15 days from the date when the SSC receives the application and the transaction resulting in the change of ownership must occur within six months from the date of SSC approval. If this does not occur then SSC approval will be revoked automatically.

***
Please do not hesitate to contact Dr. Oliver Massmann under omassmann@duanemorris.com or any other lawyer in our office listing if you have any questions or want to know more details on the above. Dr. Oliver Massmann is the General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC.

ICO/STO: Is It Legal For Vietnamese To Participate?

The short answer is that ICO/STOs themselves are not regulated yet in Vietnam (as in most other countries). That doesn’t mean that every initial coin offering (ICO), security token offering (STO), private sale, presale, crowdsale, token generating event, airdrop or whatnot and underlying blockchain token is legal. Many laws and regulations could apply and render participating legally impossible in practice.

On the other hand, the question in Vietnam is always whether the laws are implemented and enforced. If they are enforced, what are the potential sanctions and other risks?

Illegal payment method

“Issuing, providing, and using” bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies as non-cash payment method is illegal in Vietnam. That’s the only thing that is relatively clear under the law (Decree 101/2012/ND-CP and the Criminal Code). The State Bank of Vietnam (SBV), which is the monetary authority here, has published an opinion on 30 October 2017 supporting this view. The administrative fines can be up to VND 500,000,000 (about USD 22,000) for unlicensed operation.

By implication:

  • Issuing a payment token is illegal – Are you generating a utility token that can be used to pay for accessing the system?
  • Providing payment tokens is illegal – Airdrop anyone? Or are you selling cryptos?
  • Paying with cryptocurrency is illegal
    • Are you paying for ICO tokens with ether, bitcoin, or Vietnam dong?
    • Will the platform reward users who have contributed to the ecosystem with tokens?
    • Are you paying with cryptos to receive fiat currency or other cryptos (i.e., exchange or trading)?

While the above could be narrowly interpreted to apply only to cryptocurrencies as payment method, what about other characteristics and functionalities of blockchain tokens? Vietnam has no guidance yet on how to differentiate what a token represents or is used for. This might change soon.

What is a blockchain token under the law?

Reportedly, the Ministry of Justice has submitted a proposal for crypto-assets to the Prime Minister of Vietnam for approval. The details are not public yet. The plan is to recognize crypto-assets as “property” (or “asset” as the Vietnamese term “tài sản” is sometimes translated) under the Civil Code. What kind of property? Either securities or non-securities.

If the proposal is approved, the implications of being recognized as property under the law could be vast. Potentially, non-security crypto-assets would be tradeable as commodities on exchanges. Security tokens would have to comply with Vietnam’s Securities Law, which is currently being revised. Compliant ICO/STO could become reality.

From a government perspective, the main issues are how to protect investors and prevent uncontrolled capital outflows. Recognizing crypto-assets as property under the law will strengthen the legal basis to go after fraudulent ICOs and tax evaders.

Cross-border issues

The legal framework for outbound investments from Vietnam is extremely restrictive. Investing in tokens from an ICO/STO launched outside of Vietnam could be subject to capital controls, foreign exchange regulations, and offshore investment regulations. Vietnamese individuals and organizations must first apply to register their offshore investment with the authorities in Vietnam. Not many receive the necessary offshore investment registration certificate. The legality of providing tokens cross-border from outside Vietnam to Vietnam is questionable as well.

If the token is deemed a security, most individuals in Vietnam would be precluded from purchasing them legally. Individuals are generally not allowed to invest in securities outside of Vietnam. The only exception: employees of foreign companies may participate in bonuses share schemes (e.g., employee stock options). Securities companies, insurance companies, banks and a few other organizations may invest in foreign securities, but only in those securities approved by the SBV.

In addition, all profits derived from offshore investment activities must be repatriated within 6 month of tax finalization, unless they are used to expand the offshore investment (which requires another registration procedure in Vietnam).

Outlook

A legal way for conducting an ICO/STO could be boon for Vietnamese start-ups and small and medium-sized enterprises who have difficulties in accessing traditional funding channels. If capital cannot be raised in Vietnam in a legal way, such activities will stay underground. Entrepreneurs will seek other venues. However, with overwhelming enthusiasm in Vietnam for blockchain technology and cryptos, hopes are high that the country will adopt a workable legal framework that will promote compliant ICOs and STOs.

For more information, please contact Manfred Otto at MOtto@duanemorris.com or any other lawyer at Duane Morris.

The firm’s disclaimer applies to this post.

 

Rechtsanwalt in Vietnam Dr. Oliver Massmann – Sektor Infrastruktur und Abfallbehandlung – Aktuelle Themen und Lösungen für Investitionen und Ausblick auf die wichtigsten Handelsabkommen CPTPP, EUVNFTA und das Investitionsschutzabkommen

A. Überblick

Die Sektoren der Abfallbehandlung und Infrastruktur in Vietnam sehen sich verschiedenen Schwierigkeiten gegenüber. Die Abfallbehandlung ist in Vietnam ein vorrangiger Sektor, da die städtische Umgebung in den großen Provinzen dringend gereinigt werden muss. Dies führt zu einem dringenden Bedarf an Abfallbehandlungsprojekten. Die Anreize für Sponsoren sind jedoch begrenzt. Insbesondere verhindert eine Verordnung für Projekte zur Behandlung fester Abfälle, dass der von den Sponsoren erzielte Gewinn um mehr als 5% steigen kann, was sich negativ auf die finanzielle Tragfähigkeit der Projekte auswirkt.

In Bezug auf die Infrastruktur gibt es zwei Hauptprobleme. Erstens gibt es nur wenige Möglichkeiten für Sponsoren, Kapital für Infrastrukturprojekte zu beschaffen. Abgesehen von der traditionellen Projektfinanzierung haben Sponsoren von Projekten in Vietnam kaum andere Möglichkeiten, Kapital dafür zu beschaffen. Zweitens steckt die Entwicklung energieeffizienter Gebäude in Vietnam noch in den Kinderschuhen. Gebäude sind und bleiben die größten Stromverbraucher. Nur rund 100 Gebäude sind jedoch nach Green Building (GB) zertifiziert. Eine moderne, effiziente Infrastruktur ist für ein anhaltendes Wirtschaftswachstum von entscheidender Bedeutung und senkt die Geschäftskosten für alle Anleger in Vietnam.

In Bezug auf die Probleme der Abfallbehandlung kann festgestellt werden, dass aufgrund des raschen Wirtschaftswachstums und der Urbanisierung der Bedarf nicht durch die öffentlichen Mittel gedeckt werden kann. Diese Lücke muss durch andere Quellen wie private Investitionen in Form von öffentlich-privaten Partnerschaften (PPP) geschlossen werden. Um private Sponsoren für Abfallbehandlungsprojekte zu finden, kann das Problem gelöst werden, indem eine flexiblere Regelung anstelle eines festgelegten Gewinnlimits festgelegt wird.
Die Infrastrukturprobleme können vom Staat angegangen werden, indem ein staatlicher Rahmen zur Förderung alternativer Möglichkeiten zur Kapitalbeschaffung festgelegt wird. Die Problematik der Energieeffizienz von Gebäuden muss bereits während der Bauphase durch den Einsatz umweltfreundlicher Baumaterialien in Angriff genommen werden, ohne dass dabei höhere Kosten entstehen.

Außerdem bietet sich die Verwendung mehrerer Systeme und Zertifikate von “wirtschaftlichen Gebäuden” an, die den Markt bestimmen lassen, welche Praktiken sinnvoll sind. Diese Systeme könnten für den Betrieb lizenziert werden, basierend auf einer Reihe einfacher Kriterien wie Transparenz, Zuverlässigkeit und Kohärenz nach anerkannten Normen. Diese Zertifikate müssen Anreize enthalten, um Bauherren dazu zu ermutigen, energieeffiziente Gebäude zu bauen.

B. Abfallbehandlungssektor

Die Abfallbehandlung ist ein wichtiger Sektor für PPP’s. Bisher gibt es jedoch keine maßgeschneiderten Leitlinien für die Entwicklung von PPP-Projekten in diesem Sektor. Das Rundschreiben 07/2017/TT-BXD (Rundschreiben 07) regelt insbesondere die Methode zur Bestimmung des Preises für die Behandlung von Siedlungsabfällen, die als Grundlage für die Festlegung, Bewertung und Genehmigung der Preise solcher Dienste gilt. Die Regelung trat am 1. Juli 2017 in Kraft und gilt für Organisationen und Einzelpersonen.

Es ist kein Preismechanismus festgelegt, der für PPP-Projekte geeignet ist. In Rundschreiben 07 wird der Gewinn, den die Sponsoren bei Projekten zur Behandlung fester Abfälle erzielen, auf 5% begrenzt, wodurch die finanzielle Tragfähigkeit der Projekte beeinträchtigt wird.

Anstelle einer Höchstgrenze ist eine flexible Regelung erforderlich. Die zugelassenen staatlichen Stellen müssen in der Lage sein, über angemessene Servicegebühren zu entscheiden, die abhängig von den Markt- und Ausschreibungsergebnissen festgelegt werden, anstatt eine Obergrenze für die Profite festzulegen, die, wenn sie nicht dem Markt entspricht, Projekte für Investoren unattraktiv machen würde.

C. Fehlende Optionen für Sponsoren zur Kapitalbeschaffung für Projekte

Neben der traditionellen Projektfinanzierung haben Sponsoren von Infrastrukturprojekten in Vietnam kaum andere Möglichkeiten, Kapital für Projekte zu beschaffen. Die Vorschriften für Projektanleihen oder Handelskapital entsprechen entweder nicht der Art einer Infrastruktur-Projektgesellschaft (z. B. muss der Anleiheemittent im Vorjahr gewinnbringend sein, um Anleihen emittieren zu können) oder sind überhaupt nicht vorhanden (z.B. strenge Anforderungen an die Übertragung von Projektkapital, die Projektgesellschaften daran hindern, Mittel am Kapitalmarkt zu beschaffen).

Die Möglichkeit, am Kapitalmarkt Mittel zu beschaffen, würde den Sponsoren alternative Finanzierungsmöglichkeiten bieten, insbesondere angesichts der ungelösten Finanzierungsherausforderungen laufender Projekte. Die Regierung sollte einen rechtlichen Rahmen zur Unterstützung solcher Alternativen in Betracht ziehen und einführen.

D. Entwicklung von grünen Gebäuden in Vietnam und Standards

Ein Hauptproblem vor dem Vietnam steht, ist, dass es kaum energieeffiziente Häuser gibt. Derzeit hat Hanoi nur etwa 100 Gebäude, die nach Green Building (GB) zertifiziert sind oder sich einer GB-Zertifizierung unterziehen. Gebäude sind und bleiben jedoch die größten Stromverbraucher. Das rasante Wachstum der Urbanisierung und der damit verbundene Lebens- und Arbeitsstil, der eine intensive Nutzung der Klimaanlagen beinhaltet, macht einen erheblichen Teil des Energieverbrauchswachstums in den großen Städten Vietnams aus. Durch die richtige Gebäudeplanung kann dieses Wachstum für die nächsten 25 Jahre eines Gebäudes reduziert werden.

Andererseits ist eine Entwicklung zu sehen. Organisationen wie der Vietnam Green Building Council (VGBC) berichten, dass das Interesse in den letzten Jahren erheblich gestiegen ist. Viele Bauherren wurden in das Konzept von GB eingeführt. Ziel ist es, Gebäude so energieeffizient wie möglich zu machen. Um eine echte Veränderung herbeizuführen, muss das Problem auf mehreren Ebenen gelöst werden.

Erstens sollten Gebäude in jedem Fall energieeffizienter werden. Dies bedeutet keine höheren Investitionskosten. Das Verfahren kann von der Architekturphase über das passive Design und die Verwendung umweltfreundlicher Baustoffe bis hin zur Implementierung energieeffizienter Geräte während des Baus angewendet werden. Das Ziel sollte sein, dass alle Gebäude die Mindeststandards des VEEBC-Codes (oder einer vereinfachten Version) erfüllen, um die Baugenehmigung in der Basic Design Stage zu erhalten. Darüber hinaus könnte Electricity of Vietnam (EVN) ein Tarifsystem vorsehen, das Gebäude mit niedrigem Energieverbrauch mit niedrigeren Preisen belohnt und Gebäuden mit hohem Verbrauch höhere Preise auferlegt.

Zweitens muss die Regierung die Eigentümer von Gebäuden dazu ermutigen, ihre Gebäude zu zertifizieren. Neben internationalen Green Building-Zertifizierungen, die bereits in Vietnam eingesetzt werden, wie dem United States Green Building Council (USGBC), der Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) und der International Finance Corporation (IFC) Edge, hat das VGBC das LOTUS-Zertifikat entwickelt. Zusammenfassend wäre es sinnvoll, mehrere Systeme für den Einsatz in Vietnam anzuerkennen, die den Markt bestimmen lassen, welche praktisch und nützlich sind. Diese Systeme könnten für den Betrieb lizenziert werden, basierend auf einer Reihe einfacher Kriterien wie Transparenz, Zuverlässigkeit und Kohärenz nach anerkannten Normen.

E. Ausblick auf wichtige Handelsabkommen TPP 11, EUVNFTA und das Investitionsschutzabkommen

US-Präsident Donald Trump hat im Januar 2017 beschlossen, sich von der Beteiligung der US am TPP zurückzuziehen. Im November 2017 trafen sich die verbleibenden TPP-Mitglieder auf dem APEC-Treffen und beschlossen, das nun als CPTPP (TPP 11) bezeichnete Abkommen ohne die USA voranzutreiben. Die Bestimmung der Vereinbarung sah vor, dass sie 60 Tage nach der Ratifizierung von mindestens 50% der Unterzeichner (sechs der elf teilnehmenden Länder) in Kraft tritt. Das sechste Land, das das Abkommen ratifiziert hat, war Australien am 31. Oktober 2018. Daher wird das Abkommen schließlich am 30. Dezember 2018 endgültig in Kraft treten.

Das CPTPP zielt darauf ab, Tariflinien und Zölle zwischen den Mitgliedstaaten für bestimmte Waren und Güter zu 100% zu beseitigen. Dies wird den vietnamesischen Markt attraktiver machen und mehr ausländische Direktinvestitionen nach Vietnam bringen.

Die Vereinbarung enthält ein eigenständiges, durchsetzbares Kapitel zur Umwelt. Die Kernpflichten dieses Kapitels verpflichten die Mitgliedsländer, ein hohes Umweltschutzniveau zu verfolgen, die innerstaatlichen Umweltgesetze wirksam durchzusetzen, nicht von diesen Gesetzen abzuweichen, um Handel oder Investitionen zu fördern, und die Transparenz sowie die Beteiligung der Öffentlichkeit zu fördern. Diese wesentlichen Bestimmungen werden dazu beitragen, die Sauberkeit in Vietnam zu verbessern.

Ein weiteres bemerkenswertes wichtiges Handelsabkommen ist das Europäische Union – Vietnam Freihandelsabkommen (EUVNFTA). Das EUVNFTA bietet große Möglichkeiten, neue Märkte für die EU und Vietnam zu erschließen. Es wird helfen, mehr Kapital nach Vietnam zu bringen. Darüber hinaus wird das EUVNFTA die meisten Wirtschaftssektoren in Vietnam stärken.

Beide Abkommen versprechen große Vorteile für den Infrastruktur- und Abfallbehandlungssektor in Vietnam und werden dazu beitragen, auf das schnelle Wirtschafts- und Bevölkerungswachstum zu reagieren. Zum Beispiel wird Vietnam an seine Verpflichtungen des Kapitels über das öffentliche Beschaffungswesen des CPTPP und der EVFTA gebunden, einschließlich der Verfahren zur Durchführung einer Ausschreibung und unter bestimmten Umständen, dass die Regierung eine öffentliche Ausschreibung durchführen muss. Die Investoren haben jetzt die Möglichkeit, sich an der Auftragsvergabe durch vietnamesische Regierungsbehörden zu beteiligen und die Regierung zu verklagen, wenn sie den Investoren nicht die Möglichkeit bietet, dies unter qualifizierten Umständen zu tun.

Das CPTPP und das EVFTA ermöglichen es, dass ausländische Investoren die vietnamesische Regierung für ihre Auftragsentscheidungen gemäß der Streitbeilegung durch Schiedsgerichtsverfahren verklagen können. Die verletzende Partei muss alle erforderlichen Maßnahmen ergreifen, um der Schiedsspruch umgehend nachzukommen. Bei Nichteinhaltung der Vorschriften, wie in der WTO, gestatten CPTPP und EVFTA auf Antrag der beschwerdeführenden Partei vorübergehende Abhilfemaßnahmen (Entschädigung). Der endgültige Schiedsspruch ist verbindlich und vollstreckbar, ohne dass die örtlichen Gerichte diesbezüglich Mitspracherechte haben. Dies ist für die Anleger von Vorteil, da der Prozentsatz annullierter ausländischer Schiedssprüche in Vietnam aus verschiedenen Gründen nach wie vor relativ hoch ist.

Zusammenfassend ist festzuhalten, dass das starke Wirtschaftswachstum in Vietnam und seine Nachfrage nach Infrastrukturentwicklung große Chancen für Investoren darstellen, die in Vietnam investieren möchten. CPTPP und EVFTA sind wirksame Instrumente zur Unterstützung ausländischer Investitionen in den vietnamesischen Infrastruktursektor in Form von PPP. Im Rahmen dieser Vereinbarungen könnten ausländische Investoren auf Schiedsverfahren zurückgreifen und die Schiedssprüche in Vietnam vollständig vollstrecken lassen.

Damit zumindest einige Teile des Freihandelsabkommens auf EU-Ebene schneller ratifiziert werden können, haben die EU und Vietnam vereinbart, Investitionsbestimmungen, für die eine Ratifizierung durch die Mitgliedstaaten erforderlich ist, aus dem Hauptabkommen zu ziehen und diese in eine gesonderte Investitionsschutz-Vereinbarung zu stellen (IPA). Derzeit wird erwartet, dass sowohl das FTA als auch das IPA dem Rat Ende 2018 förmlich vorgelegt werden, was möglicherweise das Inkrafttreten des FTA in der zweiten Hälfte des Jahres 2019 ermöglicht.

Darüber hinaus sorgt das Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) für höchste Standards der Rechtssicherheit sowie der Durchsetzbarkeit und für Schutz der Anleger. Wir machen Investoren darauf aufmerksam, diese Standards zu nutzen! Wir können Sie beraten, wie das am besten geht! Es wird im Rahmen des TPP 11 und des EUVNFTA angewendet. Nach dieser Bestimmung haben die Anleger bei Streitigkeiten im Zusammenhang mit Investitionen das Recht, durch internationale Schiedsverfahren Ansprüche an das Gastland zu erheben. Das Schiedsverfahren wird aus Gründen der Transparenz in Konfliktfällen öffentlich gemacht.

In Bezug auf das TPP wurde der Geltungsbereich des ISDS reduziert, indem Bezugnahmen auf “Investitionsvereinbarungen” und “Investitionsgenehmigungen” als Ergebnis der Diskussion über die Zukunft des TPP auf den APEC-Sitzungen am 10. und 11. November 2017 entfernt wurden.

Weitere Sicherheiten sind im Government Procurement Agreement (GPA) enthalten, das Bestandteil des TPP 11 und des EUVNFTA sein wird. Das GPA beider Verträge regelt hauptsächlich die Anforderungen darüber, Bieter oder inländische Bieter mit Investitionskapital und vietnamesische Bieter gleich zu behandeln, wenn eine Regierung Waren kauft oder eine Dienstleistung in Höhe des festgelegten Schwellenwerts anfordert.

Vietnam verpflichtet sich, Informationen zu Ausschreibungen rechtzeitig zu veröffentlichen, den Bietern ausreichend Zeit zu geben, Angebote vorzubereiten und einzureichen und die Vertraulichkeit der Angebote zu wahren. Das GPA beider Abkommen verlangt auch, dass die Vertragsparteien Angebote auf der Grundlage fairer und objektiver Grundsätze bewerten, Angebote nur anhand der in Bekanntmachungen und Ausschreibungsunterlagen festgelegten Kriterien bewerten und vergeben, ein wirksames System für Beschwerden und Streitbeilegung schaffen usw. Dieses Instrument gewährleistet einen fairen Wettbewerb sowie Projekte von Qualität und einen effizienten Entwicklungsprozess.

Bei Fragen zu diesem Thema wenden Sie sich bitte an Dr. Oliver Massmann unter omassmann@duanemorris.com. Dr. Oliver Massmann ist Generaldirektor von Duane Morris Vietnam LLC.
Vielen Dank!

Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) Vietnam’s Approval and Direct Application

On November 12, 2018, the National Assembly of Vietnam (“NAV”) has promulgated a resolution to approve and ratify the CPTPP agreement and relevant documents (“Resolution”). As a result, Vietnam formally became the 7th member of the CPTPP. Since six other nations have passed the CPTPP trade deal by 30 October 2018, the CPTPP will come into effect on 30 December 2018, after more than 8 years of negotiation.

In fact, the Resolution’s official contents have not yet been published. However, it appears that at least 15 groups of commitments of Vietnam under CPTPP will be directly applied and implemented in Vietnam, without the need of localization (i.e., not subject to guiding laws and regulations of Vietnam). Such commitments will be included in Appendix 02 of the Resolution. We will keep you informed with such direct commitments after the Resolution is published.

In order to ratify and implement the CPTPP, the Standing Committee of the NAV confirmed that 265 laws and regulations (effective by April 30, 2018) have been investigated by the Ministry of Justice and the Government. If there is any discrepancy / contradiction, such local laws and regulations would be promptly revised and amended by Vietnam accordingly. The Standing Committee of NAV also instructed the Government to ensure now certain undergoing draft laws on anti-corruption, labor, crimes, criminal procedure, intellectual properties, and insurance business to be amended in line with Vietnam’s commitments under CPTPP.

*************
Please do not hesitate to contact Dr. Oliver Massmann under omassmann@duanemorris.com if you have any questions or want to know more details on the above. Dr. Oliver Massmann is the General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC.

New Cyber-security draft decree – better but the show goes on

In October, we reported on a first draft decree to implement the Cyber-security Law and noted many concerns about its overtly stringent terms and, in particular, the threat it caused to development of a thriving e-commerce/ Industry 4.0 landscape.  Since then, the business community, among others, have been vocal on the shortcomings of the draft and offered up many comments and suggestions to address concerns.  With the release of a new draft early Novembers, it appears that the Ministry of Public Security (MPS), the decree’s authors, have listened.

 

The first clue is in the length of the new draft: cut dramatically in size from 66 clauses to just 30, it necessarily doesn’t cover as much ground as the first draft.  But the devil is always in the detail and, although the new draft is considerably less complex, particularly when it comes to issues affecting e-commerce, a close look reveals there are still areas worthy of further advocacy.

 

The question we have been asked most frequently is whether the Cyber-security Law itself, and its impending decree, govern every company on earth accessible over the Internet to Vietnam-based users. Taking the language of the “old” draft at face value, the answer was a clear affirmative, resulting in consequences both unreasonable and unnecessary to impose as well as impossible to enforce in practice, notably an obligation to localize data and establish commercial presences.  The new draft takes a much more balanced and practical approach and suggests that a far more limited number of companies will be subject to these requirements in practice. In particular, these key obligations look set to only apply to companies (whether local or international) which meet all of the following conditions:

 

  • providing one or more of specific services to users in Vietnam, including: (i) telecommunications, (ii) internet storage, (iii) internet data sharing, (iv) web hosting services, (v) e-commerce, (vi) online payment, (vii) payment intermediary, (viii) transportation connection service (think Uber), (ix) social network and social media, (x) e-gaming, and (xi) electronic mail;

 

  • collecting, exploiting, analyzing, and processing the data of Vietnamese users (see below for what amounts to “data”);

 

  • allowing its users to conduct activities prohibited by Articles 8.1 and 8.2 of the Cyber-security Law (i.e. – key Internet-based wrongdoings such as libel, anti-government propaganda, financial fraud etc.); and

 

  • committing wrongdoings covered by Article 8.4.a of the Law [this appears to be a typo as there is no such clause in the Law] or Article 26.2.b of the Law (this obliges companies to prevent sharing of and delete certain kinds of “wrongful” information within 24 hours of receipt of a request from the Vietnamese authorities).

 

While criterion (1) is still very broad, it at least removes from the scope any and all companies that had service-offering websites accessible by Internet from Vietnam (such as our hypothetical Irish bank in our October blog post). Still, many other tech companies such as Amazon, Agoda, Google, Facebook etc. would fall squarely within one or more categories covered there. However, this is just the top of a funnel: even is a company fits within criterion 1 (and therefore almost certainly criterion 2) they will not automatically be required to localize data or establish commercial presences in Vietnam.  Following approaches of other jurisdictions to assess and handle based on risk and conduct, such companies will only be required to take such steps if they fail to comply with what the Cyber-security Law expects them to do (read: cooperate with the government). It is good for business as now they can decide to cooperate and avoid strict monitoring rules.

 

Apart from this new and more tolerant “co-operate-or-comply” philosophy, the data which companies may need to store in Vietnam is also watered down slightly. The list now “only” covers information which can help identify users (i.e. – names, nationalities, occupations, residency, contact information, ID/passport numbers, credit card numbers, health records, biometrics) and other user-created data (i.e. data which users choose to upload, friend lists, groups users join or interact with).  Data such as “philosophical belief” or “political views” are no longer covered in the new draft decree.

 

As ever, there is some bad with the good.  The new draft seems to double down on granting power to the MPS to proactively examine the information systems of companies in Vietnam where it suspects wrongdoing.  There is little or no due process involved in such cases.

 

In conclusion, the MPS has clearly taken on board much of the advice and criticism received following the broad and unworkable first draft decree and this is good news.  Whether this will ultimately be reflected in the final decree however still remains to be seen.

 

For more information about the Cyber-security Law in Vietnam, please contact Giles at GTCooper@duanemorris.com, Le Hau at HNLe@duanemorris.com. Giles is co-General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC and branch director of Duane Morris’ HCMC office.

Vietnam – Infrastructure and Waste Treatment Sector – Current Issues and Solutions for Investment and Outlook on the Major Trade Deals CPTPP, EUVNFTA and the EU Vietnam Investment Protection Agreement (IPA)

A. Overview
The waste treatment and infrastructure sector in Vietnam faces several issues. The waste treatment is a priority sector in Vietnam due to the urgent need to clean up urban environments in major provinces. This leads to the urgent need of waste treatment projects. However, the incentives for sponsors are limited. In particular, a regulation regarding solid waste treatment projects prevents, that the profit earned by the sponsors can raise up higher than 5%, adversely affecting the financial viability of the projects.
Regarding the infrastructure, there are two main issues. Firstly, there are only a few options for sponsors to raise capital for infrastructure projects. Besides the traditional project financing, sponsors of projects in Vietnam have hardly any other options to raise capital for it. Secondly, the development of energy efficient buildings is still in its infancy in Vietnam. Buildings are, and will remain, the largest consumers of electricity. However, just around 100 buildings have a Green Building (GB) certification. Modern, efficient infrastructure is vital to continued economic growth and lowers the costs of doing business for all investors in Vietnam.
Regarding the problems of the waste treatment, it can be determined, that due to the rapid economic growth and urbanization, public funding is unable to meet these needs. This gap has to be filled by other sources like private investment in the form of Public-Private Partnerships (PPP). In order to find private sponsors for waste treatment projects, the problem can be solved by setting a more flexible regulation instead of a fix profit limit.
The infrastructural issues can be addressed by the state setting a governmental framework to promote alternative options to raise capital. The issue regarding the energy efficiency of buildings
must already be taken up during the construction phase by using environmentally-friendly construction materials without producing higher costs and, in addition, by using multiple systems and certificates of “economic buildings”, letting the market determine which are practical and useful. These systems could be licensed for operation based on a set of simple criteria such as transparency, reliability and coherence according to recognized norms. These certificates must include incentives to encourage builders to build energy efficient buildings.

B. Waste Treatment Sector
Waste treatment is an important sector for PPP’s. However, to date there is no customized guidance on development of PPP projects in this sector. In particular, Circular 07/2017/TT-BXD (Circular 07) regulates the method for determining the price of municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment service, which is used as the basis for setting, evaluating and approving specific prices of MSW treatment services. It came into force on July 01, 2017 and applies to organizations and individuals. It does not set out a pricing mechanism that is workable for PPP projects. Circular 07 limits the profit earned by the sponsors in solid waste treatment projects to 5%, adversely affecting the financial viability of the projects.
Instead of using a maximum limit, a flexible regulation is needed. The authorized State agencies must be able to decide on appropriate service fees which will be finalized subject to the market and tender results instead of setting a cap on the fees, which, if is not in line with the market, would make projects unattractive to investors.

C. Lack of options for sponsors to raise capital for projects
Other than traditional project financing, sponsors of infrastructure projects in Vietnam have hardly any other options to raise capital for projects. The regulations on project bonds or trading
equity are either not accommodating to the nature of an infrastructure project company (e.g. the law requires that the bond issuer must be profitable in the preceding year to be eligible to issue bonds), or not available at all (e.g. strict requirements on transfer of project equity preventing project companies from raising funds on the capital market).
Being able to raise funds on the capital market would provide the sponsors with alternative financing options, especially given the unresolved financing challenges of on-going projects. The government should consider and put into place a legal framework to support such alternatives.

D. Development of green buildings in Vietnam and standards
A major issue that Vietnam faces is that energy-efficient houses hardly exist. Currently Hanoi has only around 100 buildings that are Green Building (GB)-certified or are undergoing GB certification.
However, buildings are and will remain the largest consumers of electricity. The rapid growth of urbanization and its associated life and working style, which includes intensive air-conditioning use, accounts for a considerable proportion of the energy consumption growth in the major cities of Vietnam. Proper building design can reduce this growth for the next 25 years of a building’s lifetime.
On the other hand, a development can be seen. Organizations such as the Vietnam Green Building Council (VGBC) report a significant uptick in interest over the past couple of years. Many building owners have been introduced to the concept of GB. The aim is to make buildings as energy efficient as possible. To bring absolute a real change, the problem needs to be handled on several levels.
Firstly, buildings should become more energy efficient in any case. This does not mean higher investment costs. The process can be applied from the architecture phase, with passive design and the use of environmentally-friendly construction materials, to the implementation of energy-efficient devices during construction. The aim should be that all buildings achieve the minimum standards of the VEEBC code (or a simplified version) in order to receive the Building license at Basic Design Stage. Furthermore, Electricity of Vietnam (EVN) could impose a tariff scheme that rewards low energy consumption buildings with lower prices and impose higher prices to high consumption buildings.
Secondly, the Government must provide effective encouragement for building owners to certify their buildings. In addition to international green building certifications already being used in Vietnam, such as the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) and International Finance Corporation (IFC) Edge, VGBC has developed the LOTUS certificate.
In conclusion, it would be useful, to recognize multiple systems for use in Vietnam, letting the market determine which are practical and useful. These systems could be licensed for operation based on a set of simple criteria such as transparency, reliability and coherence according to recognized norms.

E. Outlook on Major Trade Agreements TPP 11, EUVNFTA and IPA
In January 2017, US President Donald Trump decided to withdraw from the US’ participation in the TPP. In November 2017, the remaining TPP members met at the APEC meetings and concluded about pushing forward the now called CPTPP (TPP 11) without the USA. The provision of the agreement specified that it enters into effect 60 days after ratification by at least 50% of the signatories (six of the eleven participating countries). The sixth nation to ratify the deal was Australia on 31 October 2018, therefore the agreement will finally come into force on 30 December 2018. Vietnam has now officially become the 7th member of the CPTPP.
The CPTPP is targeting to eliminate tariff lines and custom duties among member states on certain goods and commodities to 100%. This will make the Vietnamese market more attractive bringing more foreign direct investment to Vietnam. The agreement includes a stand-alone, enforceable chapter on the environment. The chapter’s core obligations commit member countries to pursue high levels of environmental protection, effectively enforce domestic environmental laws, not derogate from these laws to encourage trade or investment and promote transparency and public participation. Those essential regulations will help to improve the cleanliness of Vietnam.
One another notable major trade agreement is the European Union Vietnam Free Trade Agreement (EUVNFTA). The EUVNFTA offers great opportunity to access new markets for both, the EU and Vietnam. It will help to bring more capital into Vietnam. In addition, the EUVNFTA will boost the most economic sectors in Vietnam.
Both agreements promise great benefits for the infrastructure and waste treatment sector in Vietnam and will help to react on the fast economic and population growth. For instance, Vietnam will be bound by its commitments in the Government Procurement chapter in the CPTPP and the EVFTA, including the procedures to conduct a tender and in specific circumstances that the Government must conduct a public tender. The investors now have the opportunity to participate in procurement by Vietnam’s government entities and challenge the Government if it does not grant the investors the opportunity to do so in qualified circumstances.
The CPTPP and the EVFTA make it possible that foreign investors could sue Vietnam Government for its tender decisions according to the dispute settlement by arbitration rules. The violating party must take all necessary measures to promptly comply with the arbitral decision. In case of non-compliance, as in the WTO, the CPTPP and the EVFTA allow temporary remedies (compensation) at the request of the complaining party. The final arbitral award is binding and enforceable without any question from the local courts regarding its validity. This is an advantage for investors considering the fact that the percentage of annulled foreign arbitral awards in Vietnam remains relatively high for different reasons.
In conclusion, Vietnam’s strong economic growth and its demand for infrastructure development are great opportunities for investors planning to invest in Vietnam. The CPTPP and the EVFTA are effective tools to support foreign investment in Vietnam’s infrastructure sector in the form of PPP. Under these agreements, foreign investors could take recourse to arbitration proceedings and have the arbitral awards fully enforced in Vietnam.
To enable at least some parts of the FTA to be ratified more speedily at EU level, the EU and Vietnam agreed to take provisions on investment, for which Member State ratification is required, out of the main agreement and put them in a separate Investment Protection Agreement (IPA). Currently both the FTA and IPA are expected to be formally submitted to the Council in late 2018, possibly enabling the FTA to come into force in the second half of 2019.
Furthermore, the Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) will ensure highest standards of legal certainty and enforceability and protection for investors. We alert investors to make use of these standards! We can advise how to best do that! It is going to be applied under the TPP 11 and the EUVNFTA. Under that provision, for investment related disputes, the investors have the right to bring claims to the host country by means of international arbitration. The arbitration proceedings shall be made public as a matter of transparency in conflict cases. In relation to the TPP, the scope of the ISDS was reduced by removing references to “investment agreements” and “investment authorization” as result of the discussion about the TPP’s future on the APEC meetings on 10th and 11th November 2017.
Further securities come with the Government Procurement Agreement (GPA), which is going to be part of the TPP 11 and the EUVNFTA.
The GPA in both agreements, mainly deals with the requirement to treat bidders or domestic bidders with investment capital and Vietnamese bidders equally when a government buys goods or requests for a service worth over the specified threshold. Vietnam undertakes to timely publish information on tender, allow sufficient time for bidders to prepare for and submit bids, maintain confidentiality of tenders. The GPA in both agreements also requires its Parties assess bids based on fair and objective principles, evaluate and award bids only based on criteria set out in notices and tender documentation, create an effective regime for complaints and settling disputes, etc.
This instrument will ensure a fair competition and projects of quality and efficient developing processes.

If you have any question on the above, please do not hesitate to contact Dr. Oliver Massmann under omassmann@duanemorris.com. Dr. Oliver Massmann is the General Director of Duane Morris Vietnam LLC.

Thank you very much!

Anwalt in Vietnam Dr. Oliver Massmann Bankgeschäfte und Wertpapiere

Die State Bank of Vietnam (Ngan Hang Nha Nuoc Vietnam, SBV) ist die Zentralbank Vietnams. Sie ist eine auf Ministeriumsebene befindliche Körperschaft, die der Regierung unterstellt ist. Der SBV-Gouverneur ist Mitglied des Kabinetts. Der Premierminister und das vietnamesische Parlament (Nationalversammlung) handeln gemeinsam, um den Gouverneur des SBV zu ernennen. Der Gouverneur ist für fünf Jahre zuständig. Die Hauptaufgaben des SBV sind:
• Unterstützung der Währungsstabilität und Umsetzung der Geldpolitik.
• Unterstützung der Stabilität der Institutionen und Überwachung der Finanzinstitute.
• Unterstützung von Bankeinrichtungen und Empfehlung der Wirtschaft an die Regierung.
• Unterstützung von Bankeinrichtungen für Finanzinstitute.
• Verwalten der Währungsreserven des Landes.
• Verwalten der Devisen- und Goldhandelsaktivitäten.
• Verwaltung der Kreditaufnahme und Rückzahlung von Auslandskrediten, Bereitstellung von Darlehen an ausländische Parteien und Einziehung von Auslandsschulden.
• Banknoten drucken und ausgeben.
• Überwachung aller Aktivitäten von Geschäftsbanken in Vietnam.
• Staatliches Geld an Geschäftsbanken verleihen.
• Sich dem Finanzministerium bei der Ausgabe von Staatsanleihen und staatlich garantierten Anleihen anschließen.
• Vermittlung der Staatskasse bei der Organisation von Geboten sowie bei Ausgabe, Einzahlung und Zahlung von Staatsanleihen und Wechseln.
• Verantwortung für andere Aufgaben im Bereich Währungsmanagement und Wechselkurse.
Im Jahr 1990 wurde das Bankensystem umstrukturiert. Dieser Prozess führte zu einer Trennung des SBV von anderen Geschäftsbanken und war der Beginn der Gründung des Privatbankensektors. Eine kleine Anzahl großer staatseigener Geschäftsbanken dominiert immer noch den vietnamesischen Bankensektor. Heute ist jedoch ein Privatisierungsprozess im Gange und das Ziel besteht darin, den Anteil des Staates am Staatsbesitz schrittweise von 2018 bis 2020 auf mindestens 65% und in den Jahren 2021 bis 2025 auf 51% zu beschränken. Das basiert auf dem Beschlusses Nr. 986/QĐ-TTg vom 8. August 2018, vom Premierminister, der den Plan zur Entwicklung vietnamesischer Banken bis 2025 genehmigte, Vision bis 2030. Bis zum 30. Juni 2018 lauten die Eigentumsverhältnisse des Staates in den vier größten staatlichen Geschäftsbanken wie folgt: (i) 95,28% bei BIDV, (ii) 77,1% bei der Vietcombank, (iii) 64,46% bei der Vietinbank und (iv) 100% bei der Agribank.
Ausländische Eigentumsbeschränkungen für vietnamesische Kreditinstitute
Am 3. Januar 2014 wurde das von der Regierung verabschiedete Dekret 01/2014 / ND-CP zum Erwerb ausländischer Investoren von Anteilen an vietnamesischen Kreditinstituten erlassen. Das Dekret 01 trat am 20. Februar 2014 in Kraft und löste das Dekret 69/2007 / ND-CP beim Erwerb ausländischer Investoren von Beteiligungen an vietnamesischen Geschäftsbanken ab.
Zu den vietnamesischen Kreditinstituten, die Aktien anbieten können, gehören:
1. Kreditinstitute mit Beteiligungskapital (d.h. ein Kreditinstitut, das in Form einer Beteiligungsgesellschaft gegründet wurde und strukturiert ist, einschließlich Beteiligungsgeschäftsbanken, Beteiligungsfinanzierungsgesellschaften und Beteiligungsfinanzierungsleasinggesellschaften); und
2. Kreditinstitute, die zurzeit ihre Rechtsform von einer bislang als Gesellschaft mit beschränkten Haftung tätigen Kreditinstitution in eine solche als Beteiligungsgesellschaft tätige Kreditinstitution, umwandelt.
Ausländische Investoren schließt ausländische Organisationen [Institutionen] und ausländische Einzelpersonen ein. Ausländische Organisationen sind:
1. Organisationen, die nach den Gesetzen eines anderen Landes gegründet wurden und tätig sind, sowie Zweigstellen dieser Einrichtungen in Übersee oder in Vietnam; und
2. Eine Organisation, ein geschlossener Fond, ein Mitgliedsfond oder eine Wertpapierinvestitionsgesellschaft, die in Vietnam gegründet wurde und mit einer ausländischen Kapitalzuführungsquote von über 49 Prozent arbeitet. Ausländer bedeutet jede Person, die keine vietnamesische Staatsangehörigkeit besitzt.
Dekret 01 definiert, dass der Beteiligungsbesitz direktes und indirektes Eigentum umfasst. Das Dekret 01 erläutert jedoch nicht klar den Umfang des direkten und indirekten Eigentums.
Bei einem Erwerb eines Anteils eines ausländischen Investors an einem vietnamesischen Kreditinstitut, der dazu führt, dass dieser ausländische Investor an Anteilen von weniger als 5 Prozent des Grundkapitals des vietnamesischen Kreditinstituts beteiligt ist, ist keine vorherige Zustimmung des SBV erforderlich. In anderen Fällen bedarf der Erwerb von Anteilen an einem vietnamesischen Kreditinstitut durch ausländische Investoren der vorherigen Zustimmung des SBV.
Die Beteiligungsquote einer ausländischen Person darf 5 Prozent des Charterkapitals eines vietnamesischen Kreditinstituts nicht überschreiten. Die Beteiligungsquote einer ausländischen Organisation darf 15 Prozent des Charterkapitals eines vietnamesischen Kreditinstituts nicht überschreiten.
Jeder ausländische Investor, der eine Organisation besitzt, die 10% oder mehr des Charterkapitals eines vietnamesischen Kreditinstituts besitzt, darf die von ihm gehaltene Beteiligung nicht innerhalb der nächsten drei Jahre ab dem Datum des Besitzes der 10 Prozent oder mehr an eine andere Organisation oder Person des Charterkapitals in einem solchen Kreditinstitut übertragen.
Die Beteiligungsquote eines strategischen ausländischen Investors darf 20 Prozent des Charterkapitals eines vietnamesischen Kreditinstituts nicht übersteigen. Der Anleger darf seine Anteile an dem vietnamesischen Kreditinstitut nicht innerhalb der nächsten fünf Jahre übertragen, nachdem er zum ausländischen strategischen Investor des vietnamesischen Kreditinstitut wurde.
Ein strategischer Investor ist definiert als eine ausländische Organisation mit finanzieller Kapazität, deren bevollmächtigte Person die schriftliche Zusage gibt, mit dem vietnamesischen Kreditinstitut in enger Verbindung zu ihren langfristigen Interessen zu stehen, ihren Übergang zu modernen Technologien und der Entwicklung von Bankprodukten zu erleichtern hilft sowie Dienstleistungen zur Steigerung seiner finanziellen, verwaltungstechnischen und operativen Leistungsfähigkeit erbringt.
Die Beteiligungsquote eines ausländischen Investors und seiner verbundenen Unternehmen darf 20 Prozent des Charterkapitals eines vietnamesischen Kreditinstituts nicht übersteigen. Der Gesamtbesitz aller ausländischen Investoren darf 30 Prozent des Charterkapitals einer vietnamesischen Geschäftsbank nicht überschreiten.
Der Gesamtanteil aller ausländischen Investoren an einem vietnamesischen Nichtbankenkreditinstitut wird gemäß dem für öffentliche Unternehmen und börsennotierte Unternehmen geltenden Recht umgesetzt (d.h. 49 Prozent des Charterkapitals eines solchen Instituts).
In einem besonderen Fall kann der Ministerpräsident zur Durchführung der Umstrukturierung eines schwachen und / oder in Schwierigkeiten geratenen Kreditinstituts, um die Sicherheit des Kreditinstituts zu gewährleisten, fallspezifisch vorgehen. So kann er fallabhängig eine Entscheidung über die Gesamtbeteiligungsquote einer ausländischen Organisation [oder] eines ausländischen strategischen Investors treffen und über die Gesamtbeteiligung ausländischer Investoren an einem schwachen Beteiligungskreditinstitut, das umstrukturiert wird, selbst überhalb der oben beschriebenen Grenzen.
Auf Anweisung der Regierung im Jahr 2018 erarbeitet das Ministerium eine Regierungsverordnung, die eine ausländische Eigentumsquote bei Geschäftsbanken in Vietnam von bis zu 50% erlaubt. Dieses Dekret wird jedoch erst im vierten Quartal 2019 fertiggestellt und verabschiedet.
Devisenbestimmungen
Die Devisenverordnung, die vom Ständigen Ausschuss der Nationalversammlung im Dezember 2005 erlassen wurde, im Juni 2006 in Kraft trat und am 18. März 2013 geändert wurde, regelt die Devisenaktivitäten in Vietnam. Die Regierung hat das Dekret Nr. 70/2014 / ND-CP am 18. März 2013 erlassen, um Richtlinien sowohl für die Devisenverordnung als auch für deren Änderungen bereitzustellen.

Das Dekret 70 trat am 5. September 2014 in Kraft und ersetzte das Dekret Nr. 160/2006 / ND-CP vom 28. Dezember 2006, um eine detaillierte Umsetzung der Verordnung zu ermöglichen.
Das Dekret Nr. 70 regelt die Devisengeschäfte von Gebietsansässigen und Nichtansässigen bei laufenden Transaktionen, Kapitaltransaktionen, Fremdwährungskrediten, die Verwendung von Fremdwährungen und die Erbringung von Fremdwährungsdiensten, den Devisenmarkt und Wechselkurse sowie die Verwaltung von Einfuhr- und Wechselkursen Export von Gold in Vietnam.
Im Zusammenhang mit der Aufnahme von Auslandskrediten hat die Regierung auch das Dekret Nr. 219/2013 / ND-CP vom 26. Dezember 2013 über die Verwaltung und Rückzahlung von Offshore-Darlehen erlassen, die nicht vom Staat garantiert werden. Das Dekret 219 trat am 15. Februar 2014 in Kraft und löste das Dekret 134/2005 / ND-CP zum gleichen Thema ab.
Das Dekret 219 gilt für alle Unternehmen, die nach dem Unternehmensgesetz gegründet wurden, für Kreditinstitute und Auslandsbanken nach dem Kreditinstitutsgesetz sowie Genossenschaften und Gewerkschaften, die nach dem Genossenschaftsgesetz gegründet wurden und tätig sind.
Offshore-Kredite gemäß Dekret 219 umfassen Kredite von Ausländern im Rahmen von Darlehensverträgen, Verkauf- und Kaufverträge mit Zahlungsaufschub für Rohstoffe, anvertraute Darlehensverträge und Schuldverschreibungen, die nicht vom Staat garantiert werden. Die Kreditaufnahme im Ausland muss im Allgemeinen den Bestimmungen des SBV entsprechen und unterliegt der Registrierung.
In Dekret 219 ist jedoch nicht eindeutig festgelegt, dass Anforderungen und Arten von Darlehen oder Zulassungs- / Registrierungsverfahren registriert werden sollten. Diese Themen wurden in den Richtlinien des SBV behandelt, d.h. Rundschreiben 03/2016 / TT-NHNN vom 26. Februar 2016, in dem bestimmte Richtlinien zur Devisenkontrolle in Bezug auf ausländische Kreditaufnahmen enthalten sind (geändert durch Rundschreiben 05/2016 / TT-NHNN vom 15. April 2014 und Rundschreiben Nr. 05/2017 / TT-NHNN vom 30. Juni 2017).
Mit dem Rundschreiben 03 wird erwartet, dass der rechtliche Rahmen für die Verwaltung der Kreditaufnahme und Rückzahlung von Unternehmen im Allgemeinen und von Unternehmen, die nicht vom Staat garantiert werden, verbessert wird. Einige Highlights des Rundschreibens 03 sind folgende:
• Darlehen, die als Zahlungsaufschub für die Einfuhr von Waren gewährt werden, erfordern keine Registrierung beim SBV mehr. Die Eröffnung und Nutzung von Bankkonten und Überweisungstätigkeiten müssen jedoch den Anforderungen des Rundschreibens 03 entsprechen.
• Kredite, die bei der State Bank registriert werden müssen, umfassen: (i) mittel- und langfristige Auslandsdarlehen, (ii) kurzfristige Auslandsdarlehen, deren Darlehenslaufzeit mehr als ein Jahr beträgt; und (iii) kurzfristige Auslandskredite, die nicht verlängert werden, aber die ausstehenden Kapitalbeträge der Kredite wurden nicht vor oder innerhalb von 10 Tagen nach einem Jahr ab dem Datum der ersten Kreditentnahme vollständig zurückgezahlt.
• Ein Kreditnehmer, der kein im Ausland investiertes Unternehmen ist, muss bei den zugelassenen Banken in Vietnam für die Zwecke des Auslandsdarlehens ein Bankkonto eröffnen. Für ausländisch investierte Unternehmen können ihre Konten für Direktinvestitionskapitalbanken zu diesem Zweck verwendet werden.
• Wenn sich der Zeitplan für die Darlehensauszahlung, die Rückzahlung oder die Zinszahlung um weniger als 10 Tage gegenüber dem bereits bei der SBV registrierten Zeitplan ändert, muss der Kreditnehmer nur seine Bank benachrichtigen und muss die Änderungen nicht bei der SBV registrieren. Wenn sich der Zeitplan jedoch um mehr als 10 Tage ändert, ist eine Neuanmeldung beim SBV erforderlich.
• Das Rundschreiben 03 ermöglicht auch die Benachrichtigung der SBV (anstelle der Änderungsregistrierung) in Bezug auf bestimmte bei der SBV registrierte Informationen der Unternehmen, z. B. die Änderung der Adresse des Kreditnehmers in der Provinz / Stadt, in der er seinen Hauptsitz hat, oder die Änderung von Handelsnamen der jeweiligen Banken, die Kontodienste erbringen, usw.
Die Regierung erließ am 17. Oktober 2014 das Dekret Nr. 96/2014 / ND-CP über Sanktionen bei Verstößen gegen die Verwaltung von Geld- und Bankgeschäften. Das Dekret 96 trat am 12. Dezember 2014 in Kraft und ersetzte (i) das Dekret Nr. 95/2011 / ND-CP vom 20. Dezember 2011 und (ii) das Dekret Nr. 202/2004 / ND-CP vom 10. Dezember 2004 auf Sanktionen bei administrativen Verstößen im Bereich der Geld- und Bankgeschäfte.
Dieses Dekret soll den Devisen- und Goldhandel sowie die einschlägigen Aktivitäten in Vietnam straffen. Gemäß diesem Dekret wurden Geldstrafen in Bezug auf Gold- und Devisenhandel, Notierung / Zahlung / Werbung in Forex / Gold usw. deutlich erhöht, d.h. von 5 Mio. VND (240 USD) auf 600 Mio. VND (29.000 USD). Zum Beispiel kann die mögliche Strafe für Verstöße gegen Goldbarren ohne Lizenz bis zu 500 Mio. VND (24.000 US-Dollar) betragen, oder eine mögliche Strafe für Verstöße gegen Forex-Aktivitäten von Kreditinstituten ohne Lizenz können bis zu 600 Mio. VND betragen (29.000 $). Darüber hinaus können Devisen / Gold, die für Handelsverstöße relevant sind, konfisziert werden, und das Registrierungszertifikat für den Forex-Agenten und die Geschäftslizenz für Gold der betreffenden Parteien können ebenfalls ausgesetzt oder widerrufen werden.
Jüngste Entwicklungen der Wertpapierregulierung
Anfang 2007 trat das erste vietnamesische Wertpapiergesetz (Nr. 70/2006 / QH11, 2007) in Kraft, das aus 11 Kapiteln und 136 Artikeln (in der Fassung vom 24. November 2010) bestand. Das Wertpapiergesetz deckt hauptsächlich inländische Emissionen von Wertpapieren ab, die in Vietnam notiert sind, und beschränkt sich daher auf öffentliche Emissionen von Wertpapieren. Es gilt nicht für die Privatplatzierung nicht notierter Wertpapiere. Der Begriff “Wertpapiere” umfasst eine Vielzahl wertvoller Instrumente, darunter:
• Aktien.
• Anleihen.
• Optionsscheine.
• Zertifikate.
• Put & Call-options.
• Zukünftige Verträge, unabhängig von ihrer Form.
• Kapitaleinlageverträge.
Das Wertpapiergesetz regelt insbesondere:
• Öffentliche Angebote von Wertpapieren.
• Auflistungen.
• Umgang.
• Handel.
• Anlage in Wertpapieren.
• Wertpapierdienstleistungen.
Gründung und Regulierung von Wertpapierfirmen und Investmentfonds.
Der Anwendungsbereich des Wertpapiergesetzes berücksichtigt zwei Arten von inländischen Wertpapierhandelsmärkten – das Securities Trading Center und die Börse. Die örtliche Aufsichtsbehörde, die State Securities Commission, kontrolliert und überwacht beide Märkte. Sie sind jedoch unabhängige juristische Personen. Der SSC ist eine staatliche Einrichtung, die vom Finanzministerium beaufsichtigt wird. Die Regierung und das Ministerium haben mehrere Erlasse, Beschlüsse und Rundschreiben zur Umsetzung des Wertpapiergesetzes erlassen. Nach dem Wertpapiergesetz müssen öffentlich angebotene Wertpapiere in Vietnam auf VND lauten. Der Nennwert einer börsennotierten Aktie beträgt VND 10.000; Der Mindestnennbetrag eines öffentlich angebotenen Darlehens beträgt jedoch 100.000 VND.
Am 10. Januar 2012 erteilte das Ministerium die Entscheidung Nr. 62 / QD-BTC zur Genehmigung des Projektplans für die Restrukturierung von Wertpapierfirmen. Diese Entscheidung wurde als Schlüsselelement des Masterplans für die Renovierung der Börse / des Sektors, des Versicherungsmarktes und der Wertpapierfirmen bezeichnet, die vom MoF dem Partei-Politbüro vorgelegt wurden. Gemäß dieser Entscheidung werden Wertpapierfirmen auf der Grundlage des verfügbaren Kapital- / Risiko- / Kumulierten Verlustindex bewertet und in drei Gruppen (normal, Kontrolle und besondere Kontrolle) unterteilt.
Der Beschluss enthält keinen klaren Umstrukturierungsplan, schreibt jedoch bestimmte Kontrollmethoden und Sanktionen für Wertpapierfirmen vor, die den erforderlichen verfügbaren Kapital- / Risikoindex nicht erfüllen, wie etwa Offenlegungs- / Berichtsanforderungen, Überwachung oder Entzug von Lizenzen. Im August 2018 wies der stellvertretende Premierminister Vuong Dinh Hue das MoF an, zu forschen und einen neuen Plan zur Umstrukturierung des Wertpapiermarktes bis 2020 (Vision bis 2025) zu erstellen. Der Detailprojektplan wird voraussichtlich Anfang 2019 veröffentlicht und umgesetzt.
Am 20. Juli 2012 wurde das Dekret Nr. 58/2012 / ND-CP erlassen, um Richtlinien für das Wertpapiergesetz und das Gesetz zur Änderung bestimmter Artikel des Wertpapiergesetzes über Angebote zum Verkauf von Wertpapieren, Notierung, Handel, Unternehmen und Investmentgesellschaften zu erlassen Wertpapiere und Dienstleistungen in Bezug auf Wertpapiere und den Wertpapiermarkt. Der Erlass schaffte das Dekret Nr. 14/2007 / ND-CP vom 19. Januar 2007, das Dekret 84/2010 / ND-CP vom 2. August 2010 und das Dekret 01/2010 / ND-CP vom 4. Januar 2010 sowie das Dekret Nr. 58/2012 / ND-CP ab.
Am 26. Juni 2015 verkündete die Regierung das Dekret Nr. 60/2015 / ND-CP zur Änderung bestimmter Artikel des Dekrets 58 und legte Richtlinien für das Wertpapierrecht vor. Das Dekret 60 trat am 1. September 2015 in Kraft und hebt die Entscheidung Nr. 55 / QD-TTg des Premierministers vom 15. April 2009 über die ausländische Eigentumsquote an vietnamesischen Börsen auf.
Das Dekret 60 enthält keine Beschränkung über ausländisches Eigentum in Bezug auf Unternehmen, die in Vietnam unbedingte Geschäfte machen, und erlaubt ausländischen Unternehmen, in Staatsanleihen und Unternehmensanleihen in Vietnam zu investieren.
Der Entwurf des überarbeiteten Gesetzes über Wertpapiere ist im Gange und wird voraussichtlich im vierten Quartal 2019 veröffentlicht. Dieser Entwurf zielt auf die Umstrukturierung der Aktienmärkte, die Neuorganisation und Verbesserung von Wertpapier- und Fondsgesellschaften sowie die Aufhebung der noch ausstehenden Beschränkungen für ausländisches Eigentum von öffentlichen Unternehmen in Vietnam ab.

Öffentliche Angebote
Mit der Bekanntgabe des Wertpapiergesetzes und seiner Änderungen wurden Richtlinien, Regeln, Verfahren und Beschränkungen für die Ausgabe von öffentlichen Aktien und Anleihen festgelegt. Gemäß Artikel 12.1 des Wertpapiergesetzes und seiner Änderungen muss ein Emittent zum Zeitpunkt der Registrierung des Angebots bereits ein Nominalkapital in Höhe von mindestens 10 Mrd. VND hinterlegt haben. Darüber hinaus muss ein Antragsteller nachweisen, dass der Gewinn im Jahr vor dem Angebot erzielt wurde.
Die Errichtung eines Fonds sieht ein Mindestkapital von 50 Mrd. VND vor. Andere Arten von Unternehmen müssen möglicherweise zusätzliche Bedingungen erfüllen, z. B. muss eine Aktiengesellschaft, die ein öffentliches Angebot von Wertpapieren registriert, eine von ihrer Hauptversammlung beschlossene Verpflichtung eingehen, um die Aktien innerhalb eines Jahres seit Ausgabe des Angebots an einem organisierten Handelsplatz zu platzieren (Gesetz zur Änderung bestimmter Artikel des Wertpapiergesetzes vom 24. November 2010 und Erlass Nr. 58/2012 / ND-CP vom 20. Juli 2012, das das Wertpapiergesetz und das Gesetz zur Änderung bestimmter Artikel des Wertpapiergesetzes regelt).
Um das Verfahren für ein öffentliches Angebot zu eröffnen, muss ein Antrag in Form einer Registrierungserklärung eingereicht werden, die Folgendes umfasst:
• Die Prognose.
• Die geprüften Abschlüsse der vorangegangenen zwei Geschäftsjahre.
• Die Gründungsdokumente des Emittenten und die entsprechenden Unternehmensbeschlüsse.
Die wichtigsten Inhalte einer Prognose sind im Rundschreiben Nr. 29/2017 / TT-BTC vom 12. April 2017 des Finanzministeriums enthalten, das Leitlinien für die Notierung von Wertpapieren an Börsen enthält. Ausländische Investoren sollten sich des Mangels an festen Standards für Abschlüsse und Buchhaltung in Vietnam bewusst sein, die zu Inkonsistenzen bei der Rechnungslegung und dem Qualitätsniveau führen können.
Privatplatzierungen
Eine Privatplatzierung ist im Wertpapiergesetz und seiner Änderung definiert als eine Anordnung, die Wertpapiere weniger als einhundert Anlegern anbietet, nicht professionellen Wertpapieranlegern, ohne dass Massenmedien oder das Internet genutzt werden. Das Dekret 58/2012 / ND-CP vom 20. Juli 2012 (in der durch Dekret 60/2015 / ND-CP vom 26. Juni 2015 geänderten Fassung) und das Wertpapiergesetz enthalten Bedingungen für eine Privatplatzierung durch öffentliche Unternehmen wie folgt:
o Beschluss der Hauptversammlung der Aktionäre zur Genehmigung des Plans zur Privatplatzierung von Aktien / Wandelschuldverschreibungen und Verwendung des Erlöses aus der Angebotstranche; und dieser Plan muss das Ziel, die Zielinvestoren und die Kriterien für die Auswahl der Zielinvestoren, die Anzahl der Investoren und die vorgeschlagene Angebotsgröße festlegen;
o Die Sperrfrist für die Übertragung der in Privatbesitz befindlichen Aktien oder Wandelschuldverschreibungen beträgt mindestens ein Jahr ab dem Datum des Abschlusses der Angebotstransaktion, mit Ausnahme bestimmter Fälle wie einer Privatplatzierung gemäß einem Mitarbeiterauswahlplan usw.
o Die ausstellende Gesellschaft ist nicht die Muttergesellschaft der Gesellschaft, die privat platzierte Anteile kauft; Oder keine der Gesellschaften sind Tochterunternehmen einer Muttergesellschaft;
o Zwischen den Tranchen der Privatplatzierung von Aktien oder wandelbaren Darlehen müssen mindestens sechs Monate liegen, und
o Andere Bedingungen, die im anwendbaren Recht festgelegt sind.
Wenn eine Antragsunterlage unvollständig und ungültig ist, gibt die zuständige staatliche Behörde innerhalb von fünf Tagen nach Erhalt der Antragsunterlagen für die Registrierung einer Privatplatzierung von Anteilen schriftlich ihre Stellungnahme ab und fordert die ausstellende Organisation auf, die Akte zu ändern. Der Tag des Eingangs der gültigen und vollständigen Datei ist der Tag, an dem die ausstellende Organisation die Änderung und Ergänzung der Datei abschließt.
Innerhalb von 15 Tagen nach Erhalt des gültigen und wettbewerbsfähigen Dossiers für die Registrierung informiert die staatliche Behörde die registrierende Organisation und veröffentlicht auf ihrer Website die Privatplatzierung von Anteilen der registrierenden Organisation. Die ausstellende Organisation übermittelt der zuständigen staatlichen Behörde innerhalb von 10 Tagen nach dem Datum des Verkaufs der Tranche einen Bericht über die Ergebnisse der Privatplatzierung auf dem Standardformular, das dem Dekret 58 (in der jeweils gültigen Fassung) beigefügt ist.
Börsenzulassung
Ho-Chi-Minh-Börse (HOSE)
Das Dekret 58/2012 / ND-CP sieht unter anderem Bedingungen für die Notierung von Aktien von HOSE vor:
• Das Unternehmen verfügt zum Zeitpunkt der Registrierung über ein einbezahltes Charterkapital von einhundert und 120 Milliarden Dong oder mehr;
• Die Gesellschaft ist seit mindestens zwei Jahren in Form einer Beteiligungsgesellschaft tätig, die bis zum Zeitpunkt der Eintragung zur Notierung berechnet wurde. Das Verhältnis des Eigenkapitals zum Gewinn nach Steuern (ROE) betrug im letzten Jahr mindestens fünf Prozent, und der Geschäftsbetrieb in den beiden aufeinander folgenden Jahren, die unmittelbar vor dem Jahr der Zulassung zur Zulassung standen, muss rentabel gewesen sein. Es sind keine Schulden fällig, die länger als ein Jahr überfällig sind; es gab keine kumulierten Verluste, die auf das Jahr der Registrierung zur Notierung berechnet wurden; und es entspricht den Bestimmungen des Gesetzes über Buchhaltung und Abschlüsse;
• Jedes Mitglied der Geschäftsführung oder des Aufsichtsrats der Controller, der Direktor (Generaldirektor), der stellvertretende Direktor (stellvertretender Generaldirektor), der Hauptbuchhalter, ein Großaktionär und verbundene Personen müssen die ihr gegenüber der Gesellschaft geschuldeten Schulden offen legen.
• Mindestens 20 Prozent der stimmberechtigten Aktien der Gesellschaft müssen von mindestens 300 Aktionären gehalten werden, die keine Hauptaktionäre sind, und
• Bestimmte Anteilseigner wie Mitglieder des Vorstandes oder des Aufsichtsrats der Kontrolleure usw. müssen sich verpflichten, 100% der von ihnen gehaltenen Aktien ab dem Tag der Notierung sechs Monate und 50 Prozent dieser Anzahl Aktien für die folgenden sechs Monate zu halten.
Hanoi Börse (HNX)
Das Dekret 58/2012 / ND-CP sieht unter anderem Bedingungen für die Notierung von Aktien an HNX vor:
• Das Unternehmen verfügt zum Zeitpunkt der Registrierung zur Kotierung über ein eingezahltes Charterkapital von mindestens 30 Milliarden Dong.
• Die Gesellschaft ist seit mindestens einem Jahr in Form einer Beteiligungsgesellschaft tätig, die bis zum Zeitpunkt der Eintragung zur Notierung berechnet wurde. Das Verhältnis des Eigenkapitals zum Gewinn nach Steuern (ROE) betrug im letzten Jahr mindestens fünf Prozent. Es sind keine Schulden fällig, die länger als ein Jahr überfällig sind; es hat keine kumulierten Verluste, die auf das Jahr der Registrierung zur Notierung berechnet wurden; und es entspricht den Bestimmungen des Gesetzes über Buchhaltung und Abschlüsse;
• Mindestens 15 Prozent der stimmberechtigten Aktien der Gesellschaft müssen von mindestens 100 Aktionären gehalten werden, die keine Hauptaktionäre sind, und
• Bestimmte Anteilseigner wie Mitglieder des Vorstandes oder des Aufsichtsrats der Kontrolleure usw. müssen sich verpflichten, 100% der von ihnen gehaltenen Aktien ab dem Tag der Notierung sechs Monate und 50 Prozent dieser Anzahl Aktien für die folgenden sechs Monate zu halten.
Anmeldung bei HOSE und HNX
Unternehmen, die sich für die Notierung von Wertpapieren registrieren möchten, müssen beim HOSE / HNX ein Antragsformular für die Notierung einreichen. Ein Antragsformular für die Registrierung von List-Shares umfasst unter anderem folgende Schlüsseldokumente:
• Hauptversammlung zur Zustimmung der Aktionäre;
• Register der Aktionäre, die einen Monat vor dem Datum der Antragstellung eingetragen wurden;
• Prognose;
• Unternehmen, die bestimmte Anteilseigner, wie zum Beispiel Mitglieder des Vorstands oder des Aufsichtsrats der Kontrolleure, den Direktor (Generaldirektor), den stellvertretenden Direktor (stellvertretenden Generaldirektor) und den Hauptbuchhalter der Gesellschaft usw. halten, um 100 Prozent der Anteile zu halten für sechs Monate ab dem Tag der Notierung besitzen und 50 Prozent dieser Anzahl von Aktien für die folgenden sechs Monate;
• Zertifikat des Securities Depository Centers, das die Registrierung durch das Institut bestätigt und die Aktien bei diesem Center hinterlegt; und
• Schriftliche Zustimmung der Staatsbank im Falle eines Beteiligungskreditinstituts.
Der HOSE / HNX muss einen Antrag auf Eintragung für die Aufnahme innerhalb von 30 Tagen nach Erhalt eines vollständigen und gültigen Antragsdatensatzes genehmigen oder ablehnen und im Falle einer Ablehnung seine Gründe schriftlich angeben.
Dekret Nr. 60/2015 / ND-CP vom 1. September 2015 über ausländisches Eigentum an der Börse
Im April 2009 hat der Premierminister den Beschluss 55/2009 / QD-TTg erlassen, der den Kauf und Verkauf von “Wertpapieren an der vietnamesischen Börse” regelt. Sie legt den Unterschied zwischen lokalen Investoren und ausländischen Investoren in Übereinstimmung mit ausländischen Investmentfonds fest. Es gibt auch die 49-Prozent-Regel an. Dies bedeutet, dass lokale Investmentfonds und lokale Wertpapierinvestitionsunternehmen als ausländische Investoren gelten, wenn Ausländer mehr als 49 Prozent der Anteile einer Kapitalgesellschaft halten.
Die obige Begrenzung von 49 Prozent wurde am 1. September 2015 durch das Dekret Nr. 60/2015 / ND-CP aufgehoben, d.h. es gibt im allgemeinen keine Begrenzung für die ausländische Eigentumsquote außer für “bedingte” Sektoren. Insbesondere unterliegt die neue Beschränkung nun den WTO-Verpflichtungen oder anderen spezifischen innerstaatlichen Gesetzen (z. B. der Obergrenze von 30 Prozent im Bankensektor).
Wenn es ein bedingtes Geschäft gibt, für das eine bestimmte ausländische Eigentumsbeschränkung nach innerstaatlichem Recht noch nicht festgelegt wurde, beträgt die Beschränkung 49 Prozent. Wenn es keine Beschränkungen gibt und der Sektor nach innerstaatlichem Recht kein bedingtes Geschäft ist (z. B. Vertriebsgesellschaften), gibt es keine Begrenzung für die ausländische Beteiligungsquote.
Diese Regelung gilt auch für gleichgestellte staatliche Unternehmen, um mehr ausländische Investitionen anzuziehen. Dekret 60 hebt auch alle Beschränkungen für ausländische Investoren auf, in Anleihen zu investieren. In Bezug auf Wertpapiere, Investmentzertifikate oder derivative Produkte von Aktien öffentlicher Unternehmen wird die Einschränkung ebenfalls aufgehoben.
Rundschreiben 123/2015 / BTC
Ende 2008, zwei Jahre nach dem ersten Wertpapiergesetz, erließen der SSC und das Ministerium die Entscheidung 121/2008 / QD-BTC, um den Markt für ausländische Investitionen interessanter zu machen und diejenigen zu bestrafen, die sich nicht an das Wertpapiergesetz halten. Die Entscheidung 121 regelte die Aktivitäten ausländischer Investoren am vietnamesischen Wertpapiermarkt.
Am 6. Dezember 2012 verabschiedete das MoF das Rundschreiben 213/2012 / TT-BTC, das die Aktivitäten ausländischer Investoren auf dem vietnamesischen Wertpapiermarkt regelt. Das Rundschreiben 213 trat am 15. Februar 2013 in Kraft und löste den Beschluss 121 ab.
Am 18. August 2015 veröffentlichte das Ministerium das Rundschreiben 123/2015 / TT-BTC für ausländische Investitionstätigkeiten im vietnamesischen Wertpapiermarkt (trat am 1. Oktober 2015 in Kraft), um das Dekret 60 zu lenken und das Rundschreiben 213 zu ersetzen.
Das Rundschreiben 123 enthält ausführliche Dokumente und Verfahren für ausländische Investoren, um an den Börsen Vietnams tätig zu sein. Das Rundschreiben rationalisiert die Verfahren für die Marktteilnahme ausländischer Investoren am vietnamesischen Aktienmarkt, indem die Anzahl der erforderlichen Unterlagen reduziert und das Verfahren vereinfacht wird. Das Rundschreiben beseitigt beispielsweise die Notwendigkeit, Dokumente in Vietnamesisch zu übersetzen, indem sie auf Englisch eingereicht werden können.
Das Rundschreiben sieht vor, dass inländische Unternehmensorganisationen mit einem Anteil von mehr als 51 Prozent im Ausland den Securities Trading Code (STC) vor dem Handel mit Aktien, Anleihen oder anderen Arten von Wertpapieren gemäß den Wertpapiermarktvorschriften beantragen müssen.
Benachrichtigungsverfahren für ausländische Eigentumsgrenzen (FOL).
Das Rundschreiben 123 schreibt vor, dass öffentliche Unternehmen für die Bestimmung des anwendbaren FOL verantwortlich sind. Nach der Festlegung der FOL, die für sie gilt, müssen Unternehmen, die keiner Beschränkung unterliegen, bei der State Securities Commission (SSC) ein Notifizierungsdossier einreichen. Dieses Dossier umfasst: (i) extrahierte Informationen zu Geschäftsbereichen, die auf dem National Business Registration Portal hochgeladen wurden, und die elektronische Adresse, die mit diesen Informationen verknüpft ist; und (ii) Sitzungsprotokoll und Beschluss des Vorstands zur Genehmigung des uneingeschränkten FOL (wenn das Unternehmen keinen FOL aufrechterhalten möchte) oder Sitzungsprotokoll und Beschluss der Hauptversammlung zur Genehmigung und zur Satzung das spezifische FOL (wenn das Unternehmen FOL beibehalten möchte).
Der SSC hat 10 Arbeitstage, um die Mitteilung an FOL schriftlich zu bestätigen. Innerhalb eines Arbeitstages nach Erhalt der Bestätigung von SSC in Bezug auf die anwendbare FOL müssen öffentliche Unternehmen diese Informationen auf ihrer Website veröffentlichen, wodurch die veröffentlichte FOL wirksam wird.
Das Rundschreiben 123 sieht vor, dass das ausländische Eigentum an Wertpapierfirmen unbegrenzt ist. Ausländische Anleger müssen jedoch bestimmte Qualifikationen und Bedingungen erfüllen, die im anwendbaren Recht vorgesehen sind. Ein qualifizierter ausländischer Anleger, der mehr als 51 Prozent an einer Wertpapierfirma halten möchte, muss die vorherige Genehmigung des SSC einholen, die innerhalb von 15 Tagen ab dem Datum erteilt werden kann, an dem der SSC den Antrag erhält und die Transaktion, die zum Eigentümerwechsel führt, erfolgen muss innerhalb von sechs Monaten ab dem Datum der SSC-Zulassung. Wenn dies nicht der Fall ist, wird die SSC-Genehmigung automatisch widerrufen.
Bei Fragen zu diesem Thema wenden Sie sich bitte an Dr. Oliver Massmann unter omassmann@duanemorris.com. Dr. Oliver Massmann ist der Generaldirektor von Duane Morris Vietnam LLC.
Vielen Dank!
Dr. Oliver Massmann